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Novel Self-shrinking Mask for Sub-3 nm Pattern Fabrication.

Yang PS, Cheng PH, Kao CR, Chen MJ - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: It is very difficult to realize sub-3 nm patterns using conventional lithography for next-generation high-performance nanosensing, photonic, and computing devices.Here we propose a completely original and novel concept, termed self-shrinking dielectric mask (SDM), to fabricate sub-3 nm patterns.In addition, numerous patterns with assorted shapes can be fabricated simultaneously using the SDM technique, exhibiting a much higher throughput than conventional ion beam lithography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei, 106, ROC Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
It is very difficult to realize sub-3 nm patterns using conventional lithography for next-generation high-performance nanosensing, photonic, and computing devices. Here we propose a completely original and novel concept, termed self-shrinking dielectric mask (SDM), to fabricate sub-3 nm patterns. Instead of focusing the electron and ion beams or light to an extreme scale, the SDM method relies on a hard dielectric mask which shrinks the critical dimension of nanopatterns during the ion irradiation. Based on the SDM method, a linewidth as low as 2.1 nm was achieved along with a high aspect ratio in the sub-10 nm scale. In addition, numerous patterns with assorted shapes can be fabricated simultaneously using the SDM technique, exhibiting a much higher throughput than conventional ion beam lithography. Therefore, the SDM method can be widely applied in the fields which need extreme nanoscale fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

SEM images of the shrinking line array during the ion irradiation.The initial pattern with a gap width of 145 nm before the ion irradiation is shown in (a). After merely ~4 minutes of ion exposure, the gap linewidth shrunk to 75 nm (b). The images from (c–f) were taken chronologically after 6, 8.5, 9, and 10 minutes of the ion irradiation, respectively. The result clearly demonstrates the linewidth of the gap shrunk dramatically from 145 nm to 5 nm using the SDML method.
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f3: SEM images of the shrinking line array during the ion irradiation.The initial pattern with a gap width of 145 nm before the ion irradiation is shown in (a). After merely ~4 minutes of ion exposure, the gap linewidth shrunk to 75 nm (b). The images from (c–f) were taken chronologically after 6, 8.5, 9, and 10 minutes of the ion irradiation, respectively. The result clearly demonstrates the linewidth of the gap shrunk dramatically from 145 nm to 5 nm using the SDML method.

Mentions: To observe the self-shrinking process more clearly, a series of SEM images were taken during the ion irradiation and are shown in Fig. 3. It is clearly observed that the gap size reduces dramatically from 145 nm to 5 nm with the increase of exposure time. The self-shrinking process shown in Fig. 3 also reveals that the pattern linewidth can be manipulated arbitrarily over a wide range from hundreds to a few nanometers, depending on the ion exposure time. In the supplementary information, Fig. S10 shows the Al2O3 gap width as a function of the exposure ion dose, which were obtained from the SEM images taken after every dose increment of 55.86 pC/μm2 chronologically (shown in Figs S11~S13). It can be clearly seen from these SEM images that the line array is very uniform and nearly free of any defects across a wide horizontal field width (HFW). Figure S10 reveals a linear relation between the gap width reduction and the ion irradiation dose, with a wide range of the gap width from ~120 nm to ~5 nm. The result demonstrates that SDM is a highly controllable method for the precise fabrication of uniform nanopatterns.


Novel Self-shrinking Mask for Sub-3 nm Pattern Fabrication.

Yang PS, Cheng PH, Kao CR, Chen MJ - Sci Rep (2016)

SEM images of the shrinking line array during the ion irradiation.The initial pattern with a gap width of 145 nm before the ion irradiation is shown in (a). After merely ~4 minutes of ion exposure, the gap linewidth shrunk to 75 nm (b). The images from (c–f) were taken chronologically after 6, 8.5, 9, and 10 minutes of the ion irradiation, respectively. The result clearly demonstrates the linewidth of the gap shrunk dramatically from 145 nm to 5 nm using the SDML method.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940743&req=5

f3: SEM images of the shrinking line array during the ion irradiation.The initial pattern with a gap width of 145 nm before the ion irradiation is shown in (a). After merely ~4 minutes of ion exposure, the gap linewidth shrunk to 75 nm (b). The images from (c–f) were taken chronologically after 6, 8.5, 9, and 10 minutes of the ion irradiation, respectively. The result clearly demonstrates the linewidth of the gap shrunk dramatically from 145 nm to 5 nm using the SDML method.
Mentions: To observe the self-shrinking process more clearly, a series of SEM images were taken during the ion irradiation and are shown in Fig. 3. It is clearly observed that the gap size reduces dramatically from 145 nm to 5 nm with the increase of exposure time. The self-shrinking process shown in Fig. 3 also reveals that the pattern linewidth can be manipulated arbitrarily over a wide range from hundreds to a few nanometers, depending on the ion exposure time. In the supplementary information, Fig. S10 shows the Al2O3 gap width as a function of the exposure ion dose, which were obtained from the SEM images taken after every dose increment of 55.86 pC/μm2 chronologically (shown in Figs S11~S13). It can be clearly seen from these SEM images that the line array is very uniform and nearly free of any defects across a wide horizontal field width (HFW). Figure S10 reveals a linear relation between the gap width reduction and the ion irradiation dose, with a wide range of the gap width from ~120 nm to ~5 nm. The result demonstrates that SDM is a highly controllable method for the precise fabrication of uniform nanopatterns.

Bottom Line: It is very difficult to realize sub-3 nm patterns using conventional lithography for next-generation high-performance nanosensing, photonic, and computing devices.Here we propose a completely original and novel concept, termed self-shrinking dielectric mask (SDM), to fabricate sub-3 nm patterns.In addition, numerous patterns with assorted shapes can be fabricated simultaneously using the SDM technique, exhibiting a much higher throughput than conventional ion beam lithography.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1, Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei, 106, ROC Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
It is very difficult to realize sub-3 nm patterns using conventional lithography for next-generation high-performance nanosensing, photonic, and computing devices. Here we propose a completely original and novel concept, termed self-shrinking dielectric mask (SDM), to fabricate sub-3 nm patterns. Instead of focusing the electron and ion beams or light to an extreme scale, the SDM method relies on a hard dielectric mask which shrinks the critical dimension of nanopatterns during the ion irradiation. Based on the SDM method, a linewidth as low as 2.1 nm was achieved along with a high aspect ratio in the sub-10 nm scale. In addition, numerous patterns with assorted shapes can be fabricated simultaneously using the SDM technique, exhibiting a much higher throughput than conventional ion beam lithography. Therefore, the SDM method can be widely applied in the fields which need extreme nanoscale fabrication.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus