Limits...
Spinal neurenteric cyst in a dog.

Ferrand FX, Pillard P, Carozzo C, Marchal T, Seurin MJ, Escriou C - Ir Vet J (2015)

Bottom Line: This type of cyst is well-known in humans but has never been described in dogs.We propose that neurenteric cysts should be included in the differential diagnoses for tumor-like or cystic intradural lesions in the young dog.Prognosis for this type of cyst seems to be good, as total surgical removal led to a progressive clinical improvement with no recurrence at 18 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Small Animal Surgery Department, Vet Agro Sup, Campus Vétérinaire de Lyon. 1 Avenue Bourgelat, 69280 Marcy l'Etoile, France.

ABSTRACT
A 2-year-old female crossbreed dog was presented with progressive ataxia and paraparesis. A T3-L3 spinal lesion was determined by neurological examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an ovoid-shaped, well-circumscribed mass affecting the spinal cord at the level of the T9 vertebra. A left hemilaminectomy and a durotomy at the level of T9 allowed discovery of an ovoid deformation of the meninges with a cystic appearance. En bloc removal was performed and appeared to be complete. Pathological analysis showed a voluminous cystic lesion lined by a heterogeneous epithelium. Three types of epithelium were present: a pseudostratified columnar epithelium, a stratified squamous epithelium and a transitional epithelium. Mucus production, the morphology of some cells with microvilli at the apical pole and immunohistochemical assays were highly in favor of an endodermal origin of the cyst. The age of the dog, anamnesis, MRI study and histological findings were consistent with an intradural neurenteric cyst as described in humans. Total surgical removal led to a progressive clinical improvement with no recurrence at 18 months. We report an unusual intradural extramedullary cyst, called a neurenteric cyst, in a 2-year-old female crossbreed dog. This type of cyst is well-known in humans but has never been described in dogs. We propose that neurenteric cysts should be included in the differential diagnoses for tumor-like or cystic intradural lesions in the young dog. Prognosis for this type of cyst seems to be good, as total surgical removal led to a progressive clinical improvement with no recurrence at 18 months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transverse T2-weighted slice of the lesion involving the whole diameter of the spinal cord. No relation with the nerve roots was seen
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940728&req=5

Fig2: Transverse T2-weighted slice of the lesion involving the whole diameter of the spinal cord. No relation with the nerve roots was seen

Mentions: A 2-year-old female mixed-breed dog (weight 25 kg) was admitted for slowly progressive ataxia and paraparesis over the course of one month. A rapid neurological deterioration occurred the week before presentation, characterized by fecal and urinary incontinence. The dog received prednisolone therapy, leading only to a minor improvement of neurological signs. On presentation, the dog showed no signs of pain. The dog was ambulatory with severe hind limb ataxia and paresis. All postural reactions were absent in the hind limbs. Spinal reflexes were increased in the hind limbs. The cutaneous trunci reflex was absent bilaterally, distal to T13. Neuroanatomical diagnosis was a T3-L3 spinal lesion consistent with upper motor neuron signs. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry analysis were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an open permanent low-field magnet (E-SCAN XQ device (Esaote®), B0 = 0,18 T) revealed an ovoid-shaped, well-circumscribed mass affecting the spinal cord at the level of the T9 vertebra. The lesion was iso-intense to slightly hypo-intense on T1-weighted images, strongly hyper-intense on T2-weighted images (Fig. 1 a and b), and non-contrast enhancing. The adjacent segments of the spinal cord were swollen. The mass seemed intradural on the first transverse section, but its large size (7.3 mm diameter for 11.6 mm long), filling the whole spinal cord diameter, did not allow a clear discrimination between an intradural or intramedullary lesion. The mass did not show any relation with the adjacent spinal nerve roots on the transverse slices (Fig. 2). Neither bony nor surrounding soft tissue-associated abnormalities could be seen. Given the age of the dog, the location, the shape and the MRI features of the lesion, we hypothesized that this was a neoplastic process such as an extrarenal nephroblastoma or a cystic structure such as an epidermoid cyst. The dog underwent surgery under general anesthesia. A standard approach to the thoracic vertebrae was made through a dorsal incision. A left hemilaminectomy from the eighth to the tenth thoracic vertebrae was performed.Fig. 1


Spinal neurenteric cyst in a dog.

Ferrand FX, Pillard P, Carozzo C, Marchal T, Seurin MJ, Escriou C - Ir Vet J (2015)

Transverse T2-weighted slice of the lesion involving the whole diameter of the spinal cord. No relation with the nerve roots was seen
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940728&req=5

Fig2: Transverse T2-weighted slice of the lesion involving the whole diameter of the spinal cord. No relation with the nerve roots was seen
Mentions: A 2-year-old female mixed-breed dog (weight 25 kg) was admitted for slowly progressive ataxia and paraparesis over the course of one month. A rapid neurological deterioration occurred the week before presentation, characterized by fecal and urinary incontinence. The dog received prednisolone therapy, leading only to a minor improvement of neurological signs. On presentation, the dog showed no signs of pain. The dog was ambulatory with severe hind limb ataxia and paresis. All postural reactions were absent in the hind limbs. Spinal reflexes were increased in the hind limbs. The cutaneous trunci reflex was absent bilaterally, distal to T13. Neuroanatomical diagnosis was a T3-L3 spinal lesion consistent with upper motor neuron signs. Complete blood count and serum biochemistry analysis were unremarkable. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using an open permanent low-field magnet (E-SCAN XQ device (Esaote®), B0 = 0,18 T) revealed an ovoid-shaped, well-circumscribed mass affecting the spinal cord at the level of the T9 vertebra. The lesion was iso-intense to slightly hypo-intense on T1-weighted images, strongly hyper-intense on T2-weighted images (Fig. 1 a and b), and non-contrast enhancing. The adjacent segments of the spinal cord were swollen. The mass seemed intradural on the first transverse section, but its large size (7.3 mm diameter for 11.6 mm long), filling the whole spinal cord diameter, did not allow a clear discrimination between an intradural or intramedullary lesion. The mass did not show any relation with the adjacent spinal nerve roots on the transverse slices (Fig. 2). Neither bony nor surrounding soft tissue-associated abnormalities could be seen. Given the age of the dog, the location, the shape and the MRI features of the lesion, we hypothesized that this was a neoplastic process such as an extrarenal nephroblastoma or a cystic structure such as an epidermoid cyst. The dog underwent surgery under general anesthesia. A standard approach to the thoracic vertebrae was made through a dorsal incision. A left hemilaminectomy from the eighth to the tenth thoracic vertebrae was performed.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: This type of cyst is well-known in humans but has never been described in dogs.We propose that neurenteric cysts should be included in the differential diagnoses for tumor-like or cystic intradural lesions in the young dog.Prognosis for this type of cyst seems to be good, as total surgical removal led to a progressive clinical improvement with no recurrence at 18 months.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Small Animal Surgery Department, Vet Agro Sup, Campus Vétérinaire de Lyon. 1 Avenue Bourgelat, 69280 Marcy l'Etoile, France.

ABSTRACT
A 2-year-old female crossbreed dog was presented with progressive ataxia and paraparesis. A T3-L3 spinal lesion was determined by neurological examination. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an ovoid-shaped, well-circumscribed mass affecting the spinal cord at the level of the T9 vertebra. A left hemilaminectomy and a durotomy at the level of T9 allowed discovery of an ovoid deformation of the meninges with a cystic appearance. En bloc removal was performed and appeared to be complete. Pathological analysis showed a voluminous cystic lesion lined by a heterogeneous epithelium. Three types of epithelium were present: a pseudostratified columnar epithelium, a stratified squamous epithelium and a transitional epithelium. Mucus production, the morphology of some cells with microvilli at the apical pole and immunohistochemical assays were highly in favor of an endodermal origin of the cyst. The age of the dog, anamnesis, MRI study and histological findings were consistent with an intradural neurenteric cyst as described in humans. Total surgical removal led to a progressive clinical improvement with no recurrence at 18 months. We report an unusual intradural extramedullary cyst, called a neurenteric cyst, in a 2-year-old female crossbreed dog. This type of cyst is well-known in humans but has never been described in dogs. We propose that neurenteric cysts should be included in the differential diagnoses for tumor-like or cystic intradural lesions in the young dog. Prognosis for this type of cyst seems to be good, as total surgical removal led to a progressive clinical improvement with no recurrence at 18 months.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus