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Non-malaria fevers in a high malaria endemic area of Ghana.

Asante KP, Owusu-Agyei S, Cairns M, Boamah E, Manu G, Twumasi M, Gyasi R, Adjei G, Kayan K, Mahama E, Dosoo DK, Koram K, Greenwood B, Chandramohan D - BMC Infect. Dis. (2016)

Bottom Line: The incidence of all episodes of NMF in the first year of life (first and subsequent) was 1.60 per child-year (95 % CI 1.54, 1.66).The incidence of NMF was higher among infants with low birth weight [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.22 (95 % CI 1.04-1.42) p = 0.012], infants from households of poor socio-economic status [aHR 1.22 (95 % CI 1.02-1.46) p = 0.027] and infants living furthest from a health facility [aHR 1.20 (95 % CI 1.01-1.43) p = 0.037].The incidence of NMF in infancy is high in the study area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box, 200, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana. kwakupoku.asante@kintampo-hrc.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: The importance of fevers not due to malaria [non-malaria fevers, NMFs] in children in sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly being recognised. We have investigated the influence of exposure-related factors and placental malaria on the risk of non-malaria fevers among children in Kintampo, an area of Ghana with high malaria transmission.

Methods: Between 2008 and 2011, a cohort of 1855 newborns was enrolled and followed for at least 12 months. Episodes of illness were detected by passive case detection. The primary analysis covered the period from birth up to 12 months of age, with an exploratory analysis of a sub-group of children followed for up to 24 months.

Results: The incidence of all episodes of NMF in the first year of life (first and subsequent) was 1.60 per child-year (95 % CI 1.54, 1.66). The incidence of NMF was higher among infants with low birth weight [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.22 (95 % CI 1.04-1.42) p = 0.012], infants from households of poor socio-economic status [aHR 1.22 (95 % CI 1.02-1.46) p = 0.027] and infants living furthest from a health facility [aHR 1.20 (95 % CI 1.01-1.43) p = 0.037]. The incidence of all episodes of NMF was similar among infants born to mothers with or without placental malaria [aHR 0.97 (0.87, 1.08; p = 0.584)].

Conclusion: The incidence of NMF in infancy is high in the study area. The incidence of NMF is associated with low birth weight and poor socioeconomic status but not with placental malaria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidence of non-malaria fevers during infancy; 95 % confidence interval for the rates are shown
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Fig2: Incidence of non-malaria fevers during infancy; 95 % confidence interval for the rates are shown

Mentions: A total of 2838 episodes of NMF were recorded during the first 12 months of life, 1302 (45.9 %) of which were associated with respiratory symptoms, 911 (32.1 %) with gastro-intestinal symptoms, and 625 (22.0 %) with other symptoms. During the same period of follow-up, 1242 febrile malaria episodes were recorded. Sixty-five percent (1205/1855) of the study children experienced at least one episode of NMF. The incidence of all (first and subsequent) episodes of NMF in infancy was 1.60 per child-year (95 % CI 1.54, 1.66). The incidence of NMF was low in early infancy, and rose quickly to around two episodes per child-year between 6 and 8 months of age, after which the incidence reached a plateau (Fig. 2).Fig. 2


Non-malaria fevers in a high malaria endemic area of Ghana.

Asante KP, Owusu-Agyei S, Cairns M, Boamah E, Manu G, Twumasi M, Gyasi R, Adjei G, Kayan K, Mahama E, Dosoo DK, Koram K, Greenwood B, Chandramohan D - BMC Infect. Dis. (2016)

Incidence of non-malaria fevers during infancy; 95 % confidence interval for the rates are shown
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940727&req=5

Fig2: Incidence of non-malaria fevers during infancy; 95 % confidence interval for the rates are shown
Mentions: A total of 2838 episodes of NMF were recorded during the first 12 months of life, 1302 (45.9 %) of which were associated with respiratory symptoms, 911 (32.1 %) with gastro-intestinal symptoms, and 625 (22.0 %) with other symptoms. During the same period of follow-up, 1242 febrile malaria episodes were recorded. Sixty-five percent (1205/1855) of the study children experienced at least one episode of NMF. The incidence of all (first and subsequent) episodes of NMF in infancy was 1.60 per child-year (95 % CI 1.54, 1.66). The incidence of NMF was low in early infancy, and rose quickly to around two episodes per child-year between 6 and 8 months of age, after which the incidence reached a plateau (Fig. 2).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: The incidence of all episodes of NMF in the first year of life (first and subsequent) was 1.60 per child-year (95 % CI 1.54, 1.66).The incidence of NMF was higher among infants with low birth weight [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.22 (95 % CI 1.04-1.42) p = 0.012], infants from households of poor socio-economic status [aHR 1.22 (95 % CI 1.02-1.46) p = 0.027] and infants living furthest from a health facility [aHR 1.20 (95 % CI 1.01-1.43) p = 0.037].The incidence of NMF in infancy is high in the study area.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Kintampo Health Research Centre, Ghana Health Service, P. O. Box, 200, Kintampo, Brong Ahafo Region, Ghana. kwakupoku.asante@kintampo-hrc.org.

ABSTRACT

Background: The importance of fevers not due to malaria [non-malaria fevers, NMFs] in children in sub-Saharan Africa is increasingly being recognised. We have investigated the influence of exposure-related factors and placental malaria on the risk of non-malaria fevers among children in Kintampo, an area of Ghana with high malaria transmission.

Methods: Between 2008 and 2011, a cohort of 1855 newborns was enrolled and followed for at least 12 months. Episodes of illness were detected by passive case detection. The primary analysis covered the period from birth up to 12 months of age, with an exploratory analysis of a sub-group of children followed for up to 24 months.

Results: The incidence of all episodes of NMF in the first year of life (first and subsequent) was 1.60 per child-year (95 % CI 1.54, 1.66). The incidence of NMF was higher among infants with low birth weight [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 1.22 (95 % CI 1.04-1.42) p = 0.012], infants from households of poor socio-economic status [aHR 1.22 (95 % CI 1.02-1.46) p = 0.027] and infants living furthest from a health facility [aHR 1.20 (95 % CI 1.01-1.43) p = 0.037]. The incidence of all episodes of NMF was similar among infants born to mothers with or without placental malaria [aHR 0.97 (0.87, 1.08; p = 0.584)].

Conclusion: The incidence of NMF in infancy is high in the study area. The incidence of NMF is associated with low birth weight and poor socioeconomic status but not with placental malaria.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus