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Liver fat accumulation in response to overfeeding with a high-fat diet: a comparison between South Asian and Caucasian men.

Wulan SN, Schrauwen-Hinderling VB, Westerterp KR, Plasqui G - Nutr Metab (Lond) (2015)

Bottom Line: South Asians were reported to have a higher liver fat content as compared to BMI-matched Caucasians.Liver fat content at baseline did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.48) and was associated with visceral fat area (P = 0.002, R(2) = 0.56) but not with ethnicity (P = 0.13).However as a percentage of the total abdominal fat area, VAT was higher in South Asians (P = 0.003).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute (NUTRIM) - School for Nutrition Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Universiteitssingel 50, PO.Box 616, 6200MD Maastricht, The Netherlands ; Laboratory of Food Quality and Nutrition, Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Brawijaya University, Malang, East Java Indonesia.

ABSTRACT

Background: South Asians were reported to have a higher liver fat content as compared to BMI-matched Caucasians. This study compared the increase in liver fat content in response to overfeeding with a high fat diet in South Asian and Caucasian men when matched for body fat percentage.

Methods: Ten South Asian men (BMI 18-29 kg/m(2)) and 10 Caucasian men (BMI 22-33 kg/m(2)), aged 20-40 y, matched for body fat percentage, were included. A weight maintenance diet was given for 3 days based on the individual energy requirement. Individual energy requirement of the subjects was calculated based on their body composition (measured by hydro densitometry and deuterium dilution) and activity counts (accelerometer). Liver fat content was measured before and after 4 days of overfeeding (50 % excess energy need) with a high fat diet (60 % energy from fat). Fat distribution was measured by anthropometry and an MRI scan of the abdomen while liver fat content using 1H-MRS.

Results: While having a similar body fat % (P = 0.58), South Asians had a lower BMI (P = 0.04) than Caucasians. Liver fat content at baseline did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.48) and was associated with visceral fat area (P = 0.002, R(2) = 0.56) but not with ethnicity (P = 0.13). Overfeeding with a high fat diet significantly increased liver fat (P = 0.01) but the increase did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.47). There was no difference in the total abdominal fat area (P = 0.37), subcutaneous abdominal fat area (P = 0.18) and visceral fat area (VAT, P = 0.32). However as a percentage of the total abdominal fat area, VAT was higher in South Asians (P = 0.003).

Conclusion: Despite a relatively higher percentage of visceral fat area, liver fat increased similarly in South Asian and Caucasian men in response to overfeeding with a high fat diet.

Trial registration: The study was registered in the public trial registry www.ccmo.nl No. NL31217.068.10.

No MeSH data available.


Individual (grey line) and the mean (black line) response of liver fat content to overfeeding with a high fat diet in South Asians (a) and Caucasians (b). Liver fat content before and after overfeeding with a high fat diet were assessed using ANOVA repeated measure. Data were available from 8 South Asians and 8 Caucasians matched for body fat percentage (25.0 ± 5.4 % and 23.2 ± 6.3 % for South Asian and Caucasian respectively, P = 0.53). Overfeeding with a high fat diet increased liver fat content (P = 0.01) but the increase did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.47). SA: South Asian, C: Caucasian
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Fig1: Individual (grey line) and the mean (black line) response of liver fat content to overfeeding with a high fat diet in South Asians (a) and Caucasians (b). Liver fat content before and after overfeeding with a high fat diet were assessed using ANOVA repeated measure. Data were available from 8 South Asians and 8 Caucasians matched for body fat percentage (25.0 ± 5.4 % and 23.2 ± 6.3 % for South Asian and Caucasian respectively, P = 0.53). Overfeeding with a high fat diet increased liver fat content (P = 0.01) but the increase did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.47). SA: South Asian, C: Caucasian

Mentions: Liver fat content before and after short-term overfeeding with a high fat diet is shown in Fig. 1. Data were available for 8 South Asians and 8 Caucasians matched for body fat percentage (P = 0.53). In the South Asian group, one had to be excluded because of poor signal to noise ratio in the spectra. In the Caucasian group, one subject could not undergo the measurement due to a technical problem. Therefore, these subjects were excluded from the analysis along with their body fat matched counterparts in the other group respectively.Fig. 1


Liver fat accumulation in response to overfeeding with a high-fat diet: a comparison between South Asian and Caucasian men.

Wulan SN, Schrauwen-Hinderling VB, Westerterp KR, Plasqui G - Nutr Metab (Lond) (2015)

Individual (grey line) and the mean (black line) response of liver fat content to overfeeding with a high fat diet in South Asians (a) and Caucasians (b). Liver fat content before and after overfeeding with a high fat diet were assessed using ANOVA repeated measure. Data were available from 8 South Asians and 8 Caucasians matched for body fat percentage (25.0 ± 5.4 % and 23.2 ± 6.3 % for South Asian and Caucasian respectively, P = 0.53). Overfeeding with a high fat diet increased liver fat content (P = 0.01) but the increase did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.47). SA: South Asian, C: Caucasian
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940726&req=5

Fig1: Individual (grey line) and the mean (black line) response of liver fat content to overfeeding with a high fat diet in South Asians (a) and Caucasians (b). Liver fat content before and after overfeeding with a high fat diet were assessed using ANOVA repeated measure. Data were available from 8 South Asians and 8 Caucasians matched for body fat percentage (25.0 ± 5.4 % and 23.2 ± 6.3 % for South Asian and Caucasian respectively, P = 0.53). Overfeeding with a high fat diet increased liver fat content (P = 0.01) but the increase did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.47). SA: South Asian, C: Caucasian
Mentions: Liver fat content before and after short-term overfeeding with a high fat diet is shown in Fig. 1. Data were available for 8 South Asians and 8 Caucasians matched for body fat percentage (P = 0.53). In the South Asian group, one had to be excluded because of poor signal to noise ratio in the spectra. In the Caucasian group, one subject could not undergo the measurement due to a technical problem. Therefore, these subjects were excluded from the analysis along with their body fat matched counterparts in the other group respectively.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: South Asians were reported to have a higher liver fat content as compared to BMI-matched Caucasians.Liver fat content at baseline did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.48) and was associated with visceral fat area (P = 0.002, R(2) = 0.56) but not with ethnicity (P = 0.13).However as a percentage of the total abdominal fat area, VAT was higher in South Asians (P = 0.003).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Biology, Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute (NUTRIM) - School for Nutrition Toxicology and Metabolism, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+), Universiteitssingel 50, PO.Box 616, 6200MD Maastricht, The Netherlands ; Laboratory of Food Quality and Nutrition, Department of Food and Agricultural Product Technology, Faculty of Agricultural Technology, Brawijaya University, Malang, East Java Indonesia.

ABSTRACT

Background: South Asians were reported to have a higher liver fat content as compared to BMI-matched Caucasians. This study compared the increase in liver fat content in response to overfeeding with a high fat diet in South Asian and Caucasian men when matched for body fat percentage.

Methods: Ten South Asian men (BMI 18-29 kg/m(2)) and 10 Caucasian men (BMI 22-33 kg/m(2)), aged 20-40 y, matched for body fat percentage, were included. A weight maintenance diet was given for 3 days based on the individual energy requirement. Individual energy requirement of the subjects was calculated based on their body composition (measured by hydro densitometry and deuterium dilution) and activity counts (accelerometer). Liver fat content was measured before and after 4 days of overfeeding (50 % excess energy need) with a high fat diet (60 % energy from fat). Fat distribution was measured by anthropometry and an MRI scan of the abdomen while liver fat content using 1H-MRS.

Results: While having a similar body fat % (P = 0.58), South Asians had a lower BMI (P = 0.04) than Caucasians. Liver fat content at baseline did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.48) and was associated with visceral fat area (P = 0.002, R(2) = 0.56) but not with ethnicity (P = 0.13). Overfeeding with a high fat diet significantly increased liver fat (P = 0.01) but the increase did not differ between ethnicities (P = 0.47). There was no difference in the total abdominal fat area (P = 0.37), subcutaneous abdominal fat area (P = 0.18) and visceral fat area (VAT, P = 0.32). However as a percentage of the total abdominal fat area, VAT was higher in South Asians (P = 0.003).

Conclusion: Despite a relatively higher percentage of visceral fat area, liver fat increased similarly in South Asian and Caucasian men in response to overfeeding with a high fat diet.

Trial registration: The study was registered in the public trial registry www.ccmo.nl No. NL31217.068.10.

No MeSH data available.