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Application of copper-based ovitraps in local houses in West Sumatra, Indonesia: a field test of a simple and affordable larvicide for mosquito control.

Reza M, Ilmiawati C, Matsuoka H - Trop Med Health (2016)

Bottom Line: Therefore, a more economical and practical alternative is urgently needed.We previously reported that copper in liquid form is a promising candidate due to its potent larvicide properties in a laboratory setting, affordability, and availability.Our field data confirmed that copper is a potential larvicide for ovitraps, particularly in under-resourced areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Andalas University, West Sumatra, Indonesia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The application of oviposition traps (ovitraps) is one of the currently available rational methods used in mosquito control campaigns because it eliminates the larval stage. However, the use of current larvicides is hampered by their cost and applicability. Therefore, a more economical and practical alternative is urgently needed. We previously reported that copper in liquid form is a promising candidate due to its potent larvicide properties in a laboratory setting, affordability, and availability.

Methods: In the present study, a field test was performed by randomly placing copper-filled plastic pots with a concentration of 10 ppm in 21 local houses in Painan City, West Sumatra, Indonesia. Three of these pots including a control were placed inside, while another two were placed outside each of the houses.

Results: After 14 days, a large number of dead first and second instar larvae of Aedes spp. were observed in the copper-filled pots. Larvae in the control pots were all viable and thriving. Unhatched eggs and pupae were detected in several pots in the copper-treated group but were excluded from the analysis.

Conclusions: Our field data confirmed that copper is a potential larvicide for ovitraps, particularly in under-resourced areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of Sumatra Island, Indonesia. Painan City is situated between 1° 05′ south latitude and 100° 30′ east longitude
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Fig1: Map of Sumatra Island, Indonesia. Painan City is situated between 1° 05′ south latitude and 100° 30′ east longitude

Mentions: This study was conducted in Painan City, regency of Pesisir Selatan in the province of West Sumatera, Indonesia (Fig. 1). Painan City faces the Indian Ocean and is endemic for malaria and dengue hemorrhagic fever, with many breeding sites of Aedes mosquitoes. Previously, in May 2012 and July 2013, we had investigated adult wild mosquitoes in this area. Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles sundaicus were confirmed to be abundant in this area. The present ovitrap investigation was carried out in July 2015.Fig. 1


Application of copper-based ovitraps in local houses in West Sumatra, Indonesia: a field test of a simple and affordable larvicide for mosquito control.

Reza M, Ilmiawati C, Matsuoka H - Trop Med Health (2016)

Map of Sumatra Island, Indonesia. Painan City is situated between 1° 05′ south latitude and 100° 30′ east longitude
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940706&req=5

Fig1: Map of Sumatra Island, Indonesia. Painan City is situated between 1° 05′ south latitude and 100° 30′ east longitude
Mentions: This study was conducted in Painan City, regency of Pesisir Selatan in the province of West Sumatera, Indonesia (Fig. 1). Painan City faces the Indian Ocean and is endemic for malaria and dengue hemorrhagic fever, with many breeding sites of Aedes mosquitoes. Previously, in May 2012 and July 2013, we had investigated adult wild mosquitoes in this area. Aedes albopictus, Aedes aegypti, and Anopheles sundaicus were confirmed to be abundant in this area. The present ovitrap investigation was carried out in July 2015.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Therefore, a more economical and practical alternative is urgently needed.We previously reported that copper in liquid form is a promising candidate due to its potent larvicide properties in a laboratory setting, affordability, and availability.Our field data confirmed that copper is a potential larvicide for ovitraps, particularly in under-resourced areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Andalas University, West Sumatra, Indonesia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The application of oviposition traps (ovitraps) is one of the currently available rational methods used in mosquito control campaigns because it eliminates the larval stage. However, the use of current larvicides is hampered by their cost and applicability. Therefore, a more economical and practical alternative is urgently needed. We previously reported that copper in liquid form is a promising candidate due to its potent larvicide properties in a laboratory setting, affordability, and availability.

Methods: In the present study, a field test was performed by randomly placing copper-filled plastic pots with a concentration of 10 ppm in 21 local houses in Painan City, West Sumatra, Indonesia. Three of these pots including a control were placed inside, while another two were placed outside each of the houses.

Results: After 14 days, a large number of dead first and second instar larvae of Aedes spp. were observed in the copper-filled pots. Larvae in the control pots were all viable and thriving. Unhatched eggs and pupae were detected in several pots in the copper-treated group but were excluded from the analysis.

Conclusions: Our field data confirmed that copper is a potential larvicide for ovitraps, particularly in under-resourced areas.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus