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Integrating data from an online diabetes prevention program into an electronic health record and clinical workflow, a design phase usability study.

Mishuris RG, Yoder J, Wilson D, Mann D - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2016)

Bottom Line: There is an emerging opportunity to integrate this data directly into the electronic health record (EHR), but little is known about what information to share or how to share it most effectively.This provides a framework for how to integrate external data into provider workflow in efficient and effective ways.There is now the potential to realize the importance of having this data available in the clinical setting for patient engagement and health outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Boston University School of Medicine, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Crosstown 2nd floor, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. rgrochow@bu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Health information is increasingly being digitally stored and exchanged. The public is regularly collecting and storing health-related data on their own electronic devices and in the cloud. Diabetes prevention is an increasingly important preventive health measure, and diet and exercise are key components of this. Patients are turning to online programs to help them lose weight. Despite primary care physicians being important in patients' weight loss success, there is no exchange of information between the primary care provider (PCP) and these online weight loss programs. There is an emerging opportunity to integrate this data directly into the electronic health record (EHR), but little is known about what information to share or how to share it most effectively. This study aims to characterize the preferences of providers concerning the integration of externally generated lifestyle modification data into a primary care EHR workflow.

Methods: We performed a qualitative study using two rounds of semi-structured interviews with primary care providers. We used an iterative design process involving primary care providers, health information technology software developers and health services researchers to develop the interface.

Results: Using grounded-theory thematic analysis 4 themes emerged from the interviews: 1) barriers to establishing healthy lifestyles, 2) features of a lifestyle modification program, 3) reporting of outcomes to the primary care provider, and 4) integration with primary care. These themes guided the rapid-cycle agile design process of an interface of data from an online diabetes prevention program into the primary care EHR workflow.

Conclusions: The integration of external health-related data into the EHR must be embedded into the provider workflow in order to be useful to the provider and beneficial for the patient. Accomplishing this requires evaluation of that clinical workflow during software design. The development of this novel interface used rapid cycle iterative design, early involvement by providers, and usability testing methodology. This provides a framework for how to integrate external data into provider workflow in efficient and effective ways. There is now the potential to realize the importance of having this data available in the clinical setting for patient engagement and health outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Phase 1 Usability Interview Prototype
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Fig2: Phase 1 Usability Interview Prototype

Mentions: Phase 1 Usability: Based on our goal of learning more about providers’ barriers to behavior change counseling and their desire to integrate external health-related data into their practice, we developed a semi-structured interview guide (see Fig. 1) that covered: 1) comfort with behavior change counseling, 2) understanding of lifestyle modification programs, 3) perceived patient barriers to weight loss and diabetes prevention, 4) clinical workflow, and 5) review of a potential EHR interface for lifestyle modification data. The interview included reviewing a mock-up of one potential EHR interface to view this external data (see Fig. 2). The static prototype was displayed on a wide-screen computer embedded in the EHR frame to simulate the EHR work environment of those providers. The interview concluded with demographic questions as well as questions related to the provider’s comfort with and avidity toward technology.Fig. 1


Integrating data from an online diabetes prevention program into an electronic health record and clinical workflow, a design phase usability study.

Mishuris RG, Yoder J, Wilson D, Mann D - BMC Med Inform Decis Mak (2016)

Phase 1 Usability Interview Prototype
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940704&req=5

Fig2: Phase 1 Usability Interview Prototype
Mentions: Phase 1 Usability: Based on our goal of learning more about providers’ barriers to behavior change counseling and their desire to integrate external health-related data into their practice, we developed a semi-structured interview guide (see Fig. 1) that covered: 1) comfort with behavior change counseling, 2) understanding of lifestyle modification programs, 3) perceived patient barriers to weight loss and diabetes prevention, 4) clinical workflow, and 5) review of a potential EHR interface for lifestyle modification data. The interview included reviewing a mock-up of one potential EHR interface to view this external data (see Fig. 2). The static prototype was displayed on a wide-screen computer embedded in the EHR frame to simulate the EHR work environment of those providers. The interview concluded with demographic questions as well as questions related to the provider’s comfort with and avidity toward technology.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: There is an emerging opportunity to integrate this data directly into the electronic health record (EHR), but little is known about what information to share or how to share it most effectively.This provides a framework for how to integrate external data into provider workflow in efficient and effective ways.There is now the potential to realize the importance of having this data available in the clinical setting for patient engagement and health outcomes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Boston University School of Medicine, 801 Massachusetts Avenue, Crosstown 2nd floor, Boston, MA, 02118, USA. rgrochow@bu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: Health information is increasingly being digitally stored and exchanged. The public is regularly collecting and storing health-related data on their own electronic devices and in the cloud. Diabetes prevention is an increasingly important preventive health measure, and diet and exercise are key components of this. Patients are turning to online programs to help them lose weight. Despite primary care physicians being important in patients' weight loss success, there is no exchange of information between the primary care provider (PCP) and these online weight loss programs. There is an emerging opportunity to integrate this data directly into the electronic health record (EHR), but little is known about what information to share or how to share it most effectively. This study aims to characterize the preferences of providers concerning the integration of externally generated lifestyle modification data into a primary care EHR workflow.

Methods: We performed a qualitative study using two rounds of semi-structured interviews with primary care providers. We used an iterative design process involving primary care providers, health information technology software developers and health services researchers to develop the interface.

Results: Using grounded-theory thematic analysis 4 themes emerged from the interviews: 1) barriers to establishing healthy lifestyles, 2) features of a lifestyle modification program, 3) reporting of outcomes to the primary care provider, and 4) integration with primary care. These themes guided the rapid-cycle agile design process of an interface of data from an online diabetes prevention program into the primary care EHR workflow.

Conclusions: The integration of external health-related data into the EHR must be embedded into the provider workflow in order to be useful to the provider and beneficial for the patient. Accomplishing this requires evaluation of that clinical workflow during software design. The development of this novel interface used rapid cycle iterative design, early involvement by providers, and usability testing methodology. This provides a framework for how to integrate external data into provider workflow in efficient and effective ways. There is now the potential to realize the importance of having this data available in the clinical setting for patient engagement and health outcomes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus