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Health literacy in pregnant women facing prenatal screening may explain their intention to use a patient decision aid: a short report.

Delanoë A, Lépine J, Leiva Portocarrero ME, Robitaille H, Turcotte S, Lévesque I, Wilson BJ, Giguère AM, Légaré F - BMC Res Notes (2016)

Bottom Line: We recruited a convenience sample of 45 pregnant women in three clinical sites (family practice teaching unit, birthing center and obstetrical ambulatory care clinic).Two of the three scales discriminated between levels of health literacy (three numeracy questions and three health literacy questions).We found a positive correlation between pregnant women's intention to use a DA and subjective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.32, P = 0.04) but not objective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.07, P = 0.65).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Canada Research Chair in Shared Decision Making and Knowledge Translation, Public Health and Practice-Changing Research Group, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Research Centre, Hôpital St-François d'Assise, 10 rue Espinay, D6-737, Quebec City, QC, G1L 3L5, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been suggested that health literacy may impact the use of decision aids (DAs) among patients facing difficult decisions. Embedded in the pilot test of a questionnaire, this study aimed to measure the association between health literacy and pregnant women's intention to use a DA to decide about prenatal screening. We recruited a convenience sample of 45 pregnant women in three clinical sites (family practice teaching unit, birthing center and obstetrical ambulatory care clinic). We asked participating women to complete a self-administered questionnaire assessing their intention to use a DA to decide about prenatal screening and assessed their health literacy levels using one subjective and two objective scales.

Results: Two of the three scales discriminated between levels of health literacy (three numeracy questions and three health literacy questions). We found a positive correlation between pregnant women's intention to use a DA and subjective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.32, P = 0.04) but not objective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.07, P = 0.65). Hence subjective health literacy may affect the intention to use a DA among pregnant women facing a decision about prenatal screening.

Conclusion: Special attention should be given to pregnant women with lower health literacy levels to increase their intention to use a DA and ensure that every pregnant women can give informed and value-based consent to prenatal screening.

No MeSH data available.


Flow of participants. Recruitment (approached, eligible/not eligible and agree/refuse to participate) and data collection (test, lost to follow-up/retest). Numbers in parenthesis are presented in this order: pregnant women receiving care from family physicians, midwives or obstetricians–gynecologists
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Fig1: Flow of participants. Recruitment (approached, eligible/not eligible and agree/refuse to participate) and data collection (test, lost to follow-up/retest). Numbers in parenthesis are presented in this order: pregnant women receiving care from family physicians, midwives or obstetricians–gynecologists

Mentions: This study was embedded in the pilot test of a questionnaire (2-week test–retest) aiming to assess the theory-based factors influencing the use of a DA to decide about prenatal screening. Between March and April 2015, we targeted a convenience sample of 45 pregnant women in three clinical sites (family practice teaching unit, birthing center and obstetrical clinic) in Quebec City, Canada. Pregnant women were monitored by either family physicians, midwives or obstetrician–gynecologists, respectively. Inclusion criteria were (1) minimum age of 18 years; (2) being in the second trimester of pregnancy; and (3) pregnancy not classified at high-risk of complications, excluding DS risk (i.e. preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and multiple pregnancy). Women were approached consecutively in the waiting room, before and after their follow-up appointments. Of the 88 pregnant women invited to participate, 83 were found to be eligible and, of these, 45 (54 %) agreed to participate in the study (Fig. 1). The study was conducted in French and all participating women provided informed consent.Fig. 1


Health literacy in pregnant women facing prenatal screening may explain their intention to use a patient decision aid: a short report.

Delanoë A, Lépine J, Leiva Portocarrero ME, Robitaille H, Turcotte S, Lévesque I, Wilson BJ, Giguère AM, Légaré F - BMC Res Notes (2016)

Flow of participants. Recruitment (approached, eligible/not eligible and agree/refuse to participate) and data collection (test, lost to follow-up/retest). Numbers in parenthesis are presented in this order: pregnant women receiving care from family physicians, midwives or obstetricians–gynecologists
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940686&req=5

Fig1: Flow of participants. Recruitment (approached, eligible/not eligible and agree/refuse to participate) and data collection (test, lost to follow-up/retest). Numbers in parenthesis are presented in this order: pregnant women receiving care from family physicians, midwives or obstetricians–gynecologists
Mentions: This study was embedded in the pilot test of a questionnaire (2-week test–retest) aiming to assess the theory-based factors influencing the use of a DA to decide about prenatal screening. Between March and April 2015, we targeted a convenience sample of 45 pregnant women in three clinical sites (family practice teaching unit, birthing center and obstetrical clinic) in Quebec City, Canada. Pregnant women were monitored by either family physicians, midwives or obstetrician–gynecologists, respectively. Inclusion criteria were (1) minimum age of 18 years; (2) being in the second trimester of pregnancy; and (3) pregnancy not classified at high-risk of complications, excluding DS risk (i.e. preeclampsia, gestational diabetes, and multiple pregnancy). Women were approached consecutively in the waiting room, before and after their follow-up appointments. Of the 88 pregnant women invited to participate, 83 were found to be eligible and, of these, 45 (54 %) agreed to participate in the study (Fig. 1). The study was conducted in French and all participating women provided informed consent.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We recruited a convenience sample of 45 pregnant women in three clinical sites (family practice teaching unit, birthing center and obstetrical ambulatory care clinic).Two of the three scales discriminated between levels of health literacy (three numeracy questions and three health literacy questions).We found a positive correlation between pregnant women's intention to use a DA and subjective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.32, P = 0.04) but not objective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.07, P = 0.65).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Canada Research Chair in Shared Decision Making and Knowledge Translation, Public Health and Practice-Changing Research Group, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Québec Research Centre, Hôpital St-François d'Assise, 10 rue Espinay, D6-737, Quebec City, QC, G1L 3L5, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: It has been suggested that health literacy may impact the use of decision aids (DAs) among patients facing difficult decisions. Embedded in the pilot test of a questionnaire, this study aimed to measure the association between health literacy and pregnant women's intention to use a DA to decide about prenatal screening. We recruited a convenience sample of 45 pregnant women in three clinical sites (family practice teaching unit, birthing center and obstetrical ambulatory care clinic). We asked participating women to complete a self-administered questionnaire assessing their intention to use a DA to decide about prenatal screening and assessed their health literacy levels using one subjective and two objective scales.

Results: Two of the three scales discriminated between levels of health literacy (three numeracy questions and three health literacy questions). We found a positive correlation between pregnant women's intention to use a DA and subjective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.32, P = 0.04) but not objective health literacy (Spearman coefficient, Rho 0.07, P = 0.65). Hence subjective health literacy may affect the intention to use a DA among pregnant women facing a decision about prenatal screening.

Conclusion: Special attention should be given to pregnant women with lower health literacy levels to increase their intention to use a DA and ensure that every pregnant women can give informed and value-based consent to prenatal screening.

No MeSH data available.