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Theory-Based Design and Development of a Socially Connected, Gamified Mobile App for Men About Breastfeeding (Milk Man).

White BK, Martin A, White JA, Burns SK, Maycock BR, Giglia RC, Scott JA - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2016)

Bottom Line: Despite evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding, <15% of Australian babies are exclusively breastfed to the recommended 6 months.The support of the father is one of the most important factors in breastfeeding success, and targeting breastfeeding interventions to the father has been a successful strategy in previous research.It tested well with end users during development.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding, <15% of Australian babies are exclusively breastfed to the recommended 6 months. The support of the father is one of the most important factors in breastfeeding success, and targeting breastfeeding interventions to the father has been a successful strategy in previous research. Mobile technology offers unique opportunities to engage and reach populations to enhance health literacy and healthy behavior.

Objective: The objective of our study was to use previous research, formative evaluation, and behavior change theory to develop the first evidence-based breastfeeding app targeted at men. We designed the app to provide men with social support and information aiming to increase the support men can offer their breastfeeding partners.

Methods: We used social cognitive theory to design and develop the Milk Man app through stages of formative research, testing, and iteration. We held focus groups with new and expectant fathers (n=18), as well as health professionals (n=16), and used qualitative data to inform the design and development of the app. We tested a prototype with fathers (n=4) via a think-aloud study and the completion of the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS).

Results: Fathers and health professionals provided input through the focus groups that informed the app development. The think-aloud walkthroughs identified 6 areas of functionality and usability to be addressed, including the addition of a tutorial, increased size of text and icons, and greater personalization. Testers rated the app highly, and the average MARS score for the app was 4.3 out of 5.

Conclusions: To our knowledge, Milk Man is the first breastfeeding app targeted specifically at men. The development of Milk Man followed a best practice approach, including the involvement of a multidisciplinary team and grounding in behavior change theory. It tested well with end users during development. Milk Man is currently being trialed as part of the Parent Infant Feeding Initiative (ACTRN12614000605695).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Development process for Milk Man.
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figure1: Development process for Milk Man.

Mentions: Milk Man was informed by focus groups with men in the target group, in addition to consultation with health professionals. We refined it through a testing phase comprising beta testing and user testing with men in the target group. User testing involved participants completing a think-aloud walkthrough, as well as completing the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) [66] (see Testing and Iteration sections below). Figure 1 illustrates the Milk Man development process.


Theory-Based Design and Development of a Socially Connected, Gamified Mobile App for Men About Breastfeeding (Milk Man).

White BK, Martin A, White JA, Burns SK, Maycock BR, Giglia RC, Scott JA - JMIR Mhealth Uhealth (2016)

Development process for Milk Man.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940606&req=5

figure1: Development process for Milk Man.
Mentions: Milk Man was informed by focus groups with men in the target group, in addition to consultation with health professionals. We refined it through a testing phase comprising beta testing and user testing with men in the target group. User testing involved participants completing a think-aloud walkthrough, as well as completing the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS) [66] (see Testing and Iteration sections below). Figure 1 illustrates the Milk Man development process.

Bottom Line: Despite evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding, <15% of Australian babies are exclusively breastfed to the recommended 6 months.The support of the father is one of the most important factors in breastfeeding success, and targeting breastfeeding interventions to the father has been a successful strategy in previous research.It tested well with end users during development.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Curtin University, Perth, Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: Despite evidence of the benefits of breastfeeding, <15% of Australian babies are exclusively breastfed to the recommended 6 months. The support of the father is one of the most important factors in breastfeeding success, and targeting breastfeeding interventions to the father has been a successful strategy in previous research. Mobile technology offers unique opportunities to engage and reach populations to enhance health literacy and healthy behavior.

Objective: The objective of our study was to use previous research, formative evaluation, and behavior change theory to develop the first evidence-based breastfeeding app targeted at men. We designed the app to provide men with social support and information aiming to increase the support men can offer their breastfeeding partners.

Methods: We used social cognitive theory to design and develop the Milk Man app through stages of formative research, testing, and iteration. We held focus groups with new and expectant fathers (n=18), as well as health professionals (n=16), and used qualitative data to inform the design and development of the app. We tested a prototype with fathers (n=4) via a think-aloud study and the completion of the Mobile Application Rating Scale (MARS).

Results: Fathers and health professionals provided input through the focus groups that informed the app development. The think-aloud walkthroughs identified 6 areas of functionality and usability to be addressed, including the addition of a tutorial, increased size of text and icons, and greater personalization. Testers rated the app highly, and the average MARS score for the app was 4.3 out of 5.

Conclusions: To our knowledge, Milk Man is the first breastfeeding app targeted specifically at men. The development of Milk Man followed a best practice approach, including the involvement of a multidisciplinary team and grounding in behavior change theory. It tested well with end users during development. Milk Man is currently being trialed as part of the Parent Infant Feeding Initiative (ACTRN12614000605695).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus