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Treatment of prosthetic joint infections due to Propionibacterium. Similar results in 60 patients treated with and without rifampicin.

Jacobs AM, Van Hooff ML, Meis JF, Vos F, Goosen JH - Acta Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: We identified 60 patients with a Propionibacterium-associated PJI with a median duration of 21 (0.1-49) months until the occurrence of treatment failure. 39 patients received rifampicin combination therapy, with a success rate of 93% (95% CI: 83-97) after 1 year and 86% (CI: 71-93) after 2 years.Propionibacterium-associated PJI treated with surgery in combination with long-term antibiotic administration had a successful outcome at 1- and 2-year follow-up irrespective of whether the patient was treated with rifampicin.Prospective studies are needed to determine whether the use of rifampicin is beneficial in the treatment of Propionibacterium-associated PJI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Prosthetic Joint Infection Unit , Sint Maartenskliniek ;

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Currently, Propionibacterium is frequently recognized as a causative microorganism of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). We assessed treatment success at 1- and 2-year follow-up after treatment of Propionibacterium-associated PJI of the shoulder, hip, and knee. Furthermore, we attempted to determine whether postoperative treatment with rifampicin is favorable.

Patients and methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we included patients with a primary or revision joint arthroplasty of the shoulder, hip, or knee who were diagnosed with a Propionibacterium-associated PJI between November 2008 and February 2013 and who had been followed up for at least 1 year.

Results: We identified 60 patients with a Propionibacterium-associated PJI with a median duration of 21 (0.1-49) months until the occurrence of treatment failure. 39 patients received rifampicin combination therapy, with a success rate of 93% (95% CI: 83-97) after 1 year and 86% (CI: 71-93) after 2 years. The success rate was similar in patients who were treated with rifampicin and those who were not.

Interpretation: Propionibacterium-associated PJI treated with surgery in combination with long-term antibiotic administration had a successful outcome at 1- and 2-year follow-up irrespective of whether the patient was treated with rifampicin. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether the use of rifampicin is beneficial in the treatment of Propionibacterium-associated PJI.

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Kaplan-Meier survival curve of 60 patients treated for Propionibacterium-associated PJI. The cumulative success rate was 93% (95% CI: 83–97) and 86% (95% CI: 71–93) after 1 year and 2 years, respectively. The small vertical spikes represent the censored data.
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Figure 0001: Kaplan-Meier survival curve of 60 patients treated for Propionibacterium-associated PJI. The cumulative success rate was 93% (95% CI: 83–97) and 86% (95% CI: 71–93) after 1 year and 2 years, respectively. The small vertical spikes represent the censored data.

Mentions: Using the Kaplan-Meier method, an overall cumulative success rate of 93% (95% CI: 83–97) after 1 year and 86% (CI: 71–93) after 2 years was found (Figure 1). Patients treated without rifampicin combination therapy had a cumulative success rate of 90% (CI: 67–98) after 1 year and 82% (CI: 53–94) after 2 years. A cumulative success rate of 95% (CI: 81–99) and 88% (CI: 69–95) was reached in patients treated with rifampicin combination therapy after 1 year and 2 years, respectively (Figure 2). Comparison of the overall cumulative success rate of patients treated with and without rifampicin revealed a p-value of 0.7 (log-rank test).


Treatment of prosthetic joint infections due to Propionibacterium. Similar results in 60 patients treated with and without rifampicin.

Jacobs AM, Van Hooff ML, Meis JF, Vos F, Goosen JH - Acta Orthop (2015)

Kaplan-Meier survival curve of 60 patients treated for Propionibacterium-associated PJI. The cumulative success rate was 93% (95% CI: 83–97) and 86% (95% CI: 71–93) after 1 year and 2 years, respectively. The small vertical spikes represent the censored data.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940594&req=5

Figure 0001: Kaplan-Meier survival curve of 60 patients treated for Propionibacterium-associated PJI. The cumulative success rate was 93% (95% CI: 83–97) and 86% (95% CI: 71–93) after 1 year and 2 years, respectively. The small vertical spikes represent the censored data.
Mentions: Using the Kaplan-Meier method, an overall cumulative success rate of 93% (95% CI: 83–97) after 1 year and 86% (CI: 71–93) after 2 years was found (Figure 1). Patients treated without rifampicin combination therapy had a cumulative success rate of 90% (CI: 67–98) after 1 year and 82% (CI: 53–94) after 2 years. A cumulative success rate of 95% (CI: 81–99) and 88% (CI: 69–95) was reached in patients treated with rifampicin combination therapy after 1 year and 2 years, respectively (Figure 2). Comparison of the overall cumulative success rate of patients treated with and without rifampicin revealed a p-value of 0.7 (log-rank test).

Bottom Line: We identified 60 patients with a Propionibacterium-associated PJI with a median duration of 21 (0.1-49) months until the occurrence of treatment failure. 39 patients received rifampicin combination therapy, with a success rate of 93% (95% CI: 83-97) after 1 year and 86% (CI: 71-93) after 2 years.Propionibacterium-associated PJI treated with surgery in combination with long-term antibiotic administration had a successful outcome at 1- and 2-year follow-up irrespective of whether the patient was treated with rifampicin.Prospective studies are needed to determine whether the use of rifampicin is beneficial in the treatment of Propionibacterium-associated PJI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Prosthetic Joint Infection Unit , Sint Maartenskliniek ;

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Currently, Propionibacterium is frequently recognized as a causative microorganism of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). We assessed treatment success at 1- and 2-year follow-up after treatment of Propionibacterium-associated PJI of the shoulder, hip, and knee. Furthermore, we attempted to determine whether postoperative treatment with rifampicin is favorable.

Patients and methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in which we included patients with a primary or revision joint arthroplasty of the shoulder, hip, or knee who were diagnosed with a Propionibacterium-associated PJI between November 2008 and February 2013 and who had been followed up for at least 1 year.

Results: We identified 60 patients with a Propionibacterium-associated PJI with a median duration of 21 (0.1-49) months until the occurrence of treatment failure. 39 patients received rifampicin combination therapy, with a success rate of 93% (95% CI: 83-97) after 1 year and 86% (CI: 71-93) after 2 years. The success rate was similar in patients who were treated with rifampicin and those who were not.

Interpretation: Propionibacterium-associated PJI treated with surgery in combination with long-term antibiotic administration had a successful outcome at 1- and 2-year follow-up irrespective of whether the patient was treated with rifampicin. Prospective studies are needed to determine whether the use of rifampicin is beneficial in the treatment of Propionibacterium-associated PJI.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus