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Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden.

Mattila VM, Sihvonen R, Paloneva J, Felländer-Tsai L - Acta Orthop (2015)

Bottom Line: The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 10(5) person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden.The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 10(5) person-years in 1997 to 97 per 10(5) person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden.Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a 1 Division of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Department of Trauma, Musculoskeletal Surgery and Rehabilitation, Tampere University Hospital , Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden.

Patients and methods: We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012.

Results: In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 10(5) person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 10(5) person-years in 1997 to 97 per 10(5) person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden.

Interpretation: The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidence of knee arthroscopy for osteoarthritis, degenerative meniscal tears, and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland from 1997 to 2012 (left panel) and in Sweden from 2001 to 2012 (right panel), per 105 person-years. 2 hospitals in Sweden were excluded due to suspected double-coding.
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Figure 0001: Incidence of knee arthroscopy for osteoarthritis, degenerative meniscal tears, and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland from 1997 to 2012 (left panel) and in Sweden from 2001 to 2012 (right panel), per 105 person-years. 2 hospitals in Sweden were excluded due to suspected double-coding.

Mentions: During the study period in Finland, from 1997 through 2012, a total of 287,225 knee arthroscopies to treat degenerative knee disease (n = 233,375) or traumatic meniscal tears (n = 53,850) were identified in the adult population (4.0–4.3 million). The total number of knee arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease or traumatic meniscal tears in 1997 was 16,389, and in 2007 the number peaked to 20,432. Thereafter, the number of arthroscopies declined and was 15,018 in 2012. The mean age of male and female patients was 47 and 52 years, and it did not change markedly during the study period. In Sweden with an adult population of 7.1–7.6 million, the total number of arthroscopies performed for degenerative knee disease or traumatic meniscal tears from 2001 through 2012 was 115,907 (100,469 and 15,438, respectively). The number of operations in 2001 was 9,944, and the highest number of arthroscopies (11,711) was performed in 2008. The number of arthroscopies then declined to 8,114 in 2012 (Figure, Tables 2 and 3). In general, the incidence rates of knee arthroscopy were markedly lower in Sweden than in Finland.


Changes in rates of arthroscopy due to degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland and Sweden.

Mattila VM, Sihvonen R, Paloneva J, Felländer-Tsai L - Acta Orthop (2015)

Incidence of knee arthroscopy for osteoarthritis, degenerative meniscal tears, and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland from 1997 to 2012 (left panel) and in Sweden from 2001 to 2012 (right panel), per 105 person-years. 2 hospitals in Sweden were excluded due to suspected double-coding.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940592&req=5

Figure 0001: Incidence of knee arthroscopy for osteoarthritis, degenerative meniscal tears, and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland from 1997 to 2012 (left panel) and in Sweden from 2001 to 2012 (right panel), per 105 person-years. 2 hospitals in Sweden were excluded due to suspected double-coding.
Mentions: During the study period in Finland, from 1997 through 2012, a total of 287,225 knee arthroscopies to treat degenerative knee disease (n = 233,375) or traumatic meniscal tears (n = 53,850) were identified in the adult population (4.0–4.3 million). The total number of knee arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease or traumatic meniscal tears in 1997 was 16,389, and in 2007 the number peaked to 20,432. Thereafter, the number of arthroscopies declined and was 15,018 in 2012. The mean age of male and female patients was 47 and 52 years, and it did not change markedly during the study period. In Sweden with an adult population of 7.1–7.6 million, the total number of arthroscopies performed for degenerative knee disease or traumatic meniscal tears from 2001 through 2012 was 115,907 (100,469 and 15,438, respectively). The number of operations in 2001 was 9,944, and the highest number of arthroscopies (11,711) was performed in 2008. The number of arthroscopies then declined to 8,114 in 2012 (Figure, Tables 2 and 3). In general, the incidence rates of knee arthroscopy were markedly lower in Sweden than in Finland.

Bottom Line: The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 10(5) person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden.The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 10(5) person-years in 1997 to 97 per 10(5) person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden.Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a 1 Division of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Department of Trauma, Musculoskeletal Surgery and Rehabilitation, Tampere University Hospital , Tampere, Finland.

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Knee arthroscopy is commonly performed to treat degenerative knee disease symptoms and traumatic meniscal tears. We evaluated whether the recent high-quality randomized control trials not favoring arthroscopic surgery for degenerative knee disease affected the procedure incidence and trends in Finland and Sweden.

Patients and methods: We conducted a bi-national registry-based study including all adult (aged ≥18 years) inpatient and outpatient arthroscopic surgeries performed for degenerative knee disease (osteoarthritis (OA) and degenerative meniscal tears) and traumatic meniscal tears in Finland between 1997 and 2012, and in Sweden between 2001 and 2012.

Results: In Finland, the annual number of operations was 16,389 in 1997, reached 20,432 in 2007, and declined to 15,018 in 2012. In Sweden, the number of operations was 9,944 in 2001, reached 11,711 in 2008, and declined to 8,114 in 2012. The knee arthroscopy incidence for OA was 124 per 10(5) person-years in 2012 in Finland and it was 51 in Sweden. The incidence of knee arthroscopies for meniscal tears coded as traumatic steadily increased in Finland from 64 per 10(5) person-years in 1997 to 97 per 10(5) person-years in 2012, but not in Sweden.

Interpretation: The incidence of arthroscopies for degenerative knee disease declined after 2008 in both countries. Remarkably, the incidence of arthroscopy for degenerative knee disease and traumatic meniscal tears is 2 to 4 times higher in Finland than in Sweden. Efficient implementation of new high-quality evidence in clinical practice could reduce the number of ineffective surgeries.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus