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Static and Dynamic Measurement of Ocular Surface Temperature in Dry Eyes.

Tan LL, Sanjay S, Morgan PB - J Ophthalmol (2016)

Bottom Line: Dynamic measures were study of mean change and net change in OST over 10 s of sustained eye opening.Results.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical and Life Sciences, Singapore Polytechnic, Singapore 139651.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. To study ocular surface temperature (OST) in dry eyes by static and dynamic measures. Methods. OST was recorded on 62 dry eyes and 63 age- and sex-matched controls. Static measures were study of absolute OST at t = 0, 5, and 10 s after eye opening. Dynamic measures were study of mean change and net change in OST over 10 s of sustained eye opening. Ten OST indices studied were temperatures of the geometric center of the cornea (GCC), extreme temporal (T1) and nasal conjunctiva (T4), midtemporal (CT) and nasal conjunctiva (CN), temporal (LT) and nasal (LN) limbus, and mean (MOST), maximum (Max T), and minimum (Min T) temperatures of the region of interest. Results. For static measures, dry eyes recorded significantly lower GCC, MOST, Min T, Max T, T4, CT, LT, LN, and CN. For dynamic measures, dry eyes had significantly steeper regression line of mean change (corresponding to greater net change) for Max T 5 s onward and T4 at 3 s onward. Conclusions. Both static and dynamic measures of the OST were valuable and can be used as clinical tool to assess dry eye.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ocular surface marking and OST acquisition using the novel “diamond” method.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Ocular surface marking and OST acquisition using the novel “diamond” method.

Mentions: A novel “diamond” method was used to mark the ocular surface using a custom-designed OST Analysis V2 software (developed using MatLab Simulink 7.11.0, R2010b). The region of interest (ROI) formed by five anatomical points across the ocular surface (labelled as 1–5) was shaped like a diamond (Figure 1). This method has the advantages of (1) overcoming reported problems of truncated image by upper lids [28], (2) minimizing possible inconsistency in OST acquisition due to variation in palpebral aperture size, and (3) enabling study of the inferior zone of the ocular surface that was reported to be a predictive area in detection of dry eye subtypes [29]. Each point marked represents an area of 3 × 3 pixels so that temperature was an average of nine pixels:


Static and Dynamic Measurement of Ocular Surface Temperature in Dry Eyes.

Tan LL, Sanjay S, Morgan PB - J Ophthalmol (2016)

Ocular surface marking and OST acquisition using the novel “diamond” method.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940548&req=5

fig1: Ocular surface marking and OST acquisition using the novel “diamond” method.
Mentions: A novel “diamond” method was used to mark the ocular surface using a custom-designed OST Analysis V2 software (developed using MatLab Simulink 7.11.0, R2010b). The region of interest (ROI) formed by five anatomical points across the ocular surface (labelled as 1–5) was shaped like a diamond (Figure 1). This method has the advantages of (1) overcoming reported problems of truncated image by upper lids [28], (2) minimizing possible inconsistency in OST acquisition due to variation in palpebral aperture size, and (3) enabling study of the inferior zone of the ocular surface that was reported to be a predictive area in detection of dry eye subtypes [29]. Each point marked represents an area of 3 × 3 pixels so that temperature was an average of nine pixels:

Bottom Line: Dynamic measures were study of mean change and net change in OST over 10 s of sustained eye opening.Results.Conclusions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical and Life Sciences, Singapore Polytechnic, Singapore 139651.

ABSTRACT
Purpose. To study ocular surface temperature (OST) in dry eyes by static and dynamic measures. Methods. OST was recorded on 62 dry eyes and 63 age- and sex-matched controls. Static measures were study of absolute OST at t = 0, 5, and 10 s after eye opening. Dynamic measures were study of mean change and net change in OST over 10 s of sustained eye opening. Ten OST indices studied were temperatures of the geometric center of the cornea (GCC), extreme temporal (T1) and nasal conjunctiva (T4), midtemporal (CT) and nasal conjunctiva (CN), temporal (LT) and nasal (LN) limbus, and mean (MOST), maximum (Max T), and minimum (Min T) temperatures of the region of interest. Results. For static measures, dry eyes recorded significantly lower GCC, MOST, Min T, Max T, T4, CT, LT, LN, and CN. For dynamic measures, dry eyes had significantly steeper regression line of mean change (corresponding to greater net change) for Max T 5 s onward and T4 at 3 s onward. Conclusions. Both static and dynamic measures of the OST were valuable and can be used as clinical tool to assess dry eye.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus