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Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing.

Salmi M - J Med Eng (2016)

Bottom Line: Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros.Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion.Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aalto University, Otakaari 4, 02150 Espoo, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Result of 3D measurement for hollow heart model and for knee model. Scale ±3.0 mm.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig6: Result of 3D measurement for hollow heart model and for knee model. Scale ±3.0 mm.

Mentions: In the heart model made by material extrusion overall accuracy was approximately ±1.5 mm when comparing 3D printed model to virtual 3D model. Maximum errors were approximately ±3.0 mm at thin walls, sharp corners, and small holes. Also the surface of the 3D model and the 3D print was rough because of imaging soft tissue. In the knee model made by binder jetting overall accuracy was approximately ±0.75 mm when comparing 3D printed model to virtual 3D model. Maximum errors were approximately ±2.5 mm at sharp corners and small holes. One reason for errors in small holes might be postprocessing where 3D printed part is dipped in cyanoacrylate and that can accumulate in the holes. The measurement results for both heart model and knee model are shown in Figure 6. Bone structures are more accurate in medical imaging than soft tissue structures and therefore produce better results in 3D printing. Binder jetting was found more accurate in medical models than material extrusion.


Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing.

Salmi M - J Med Eng (2016)

Result of 3D measurement for hollow heart model and for knee model. Scale ±3.0 mm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940539&req=5

fig6: Result of 3D measurement for hollow heart model and for knee model. Scale ±3.0 mm.
Mentions: In the heart model made by material extrusion overall accuracy was approximately ±1.5 mm when comparing 3D printed model to virtual 3D model. Maximum errors were approximately ±3.0 mm at thin walls, sharp corners, and small holes. Also the surface of the 3D model and the 3D print was rough because of imaging soft tissue. In the knee model made by binder jetting overall accuracy was approximately ±0.75 mm when comparing 3D printed model to virtual 3D model. Maximum errors were approximately ±2.5 mm at sharp corners and small holes. One reason for errors in small holes might be postprocessing where 3D printed part is dipped in cyanoacrylate and that can accumulate in the holes. The measurement results for both heart model and knee model are shown in Figure 6. Bone structures are more accurate in medical imaging than soft tissue structures and therefore produce better results in 3D printing. Binder jetting was found more accurate in medical models than material extrusion.

Bottom Line: Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros.Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion.Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aalto University, Otakaari 4, 02150 Espoo, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

No MeSH data available.