Limits...
Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing.

Salmi M - J Med Eng (2016)

Bottom Line: Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros.Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion.Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aalto University, Otakaari 4, 02150 Espoo, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

No MeSH data available.


Preoperative model of ankle made by binder jetting with monochrome and with colors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940539&req=5

fig2: Preoperative model of ankle made by binder jetting with monochrome and with colors.

Mentions: Deformation or trauma in the ankle is challenging since there is moving joint in it. It might be hard to understand how different parts of ankle move in the ankle and especially this is hard when the anatomy is abnormal. For imaging ankles, computed tomography was used with layer thickness 625 μm. For repairing, hollowing, coloring, and other model preparation 3Data Expert 10.1 (DeskArtes Oy) was selected as software and Rhinoceros 4.0 was used to create geometry that connects different bones. The model was first verified and repaired with parameters stich gaps thinner than 0.17 mm; fill all gaps after that and remove tiny shell less than 0.01% of total size. The automatic repairing was performed two times and couple of errors were repaired manually. For repaired model line with dots was created in Rhinoceros and then solid pipe was created around it. Then the models were solidified to one shell using Boolean operations in 3Data Expert. Two ankles were segmented with 100 HU for both models using Osirix 5.7 (open source). One model was 3D printed with binder jetting method using Zprinter 450 (3D Systems, Inc.) in monochrome and the other with same 3D printer in color mode. For both material was ZP151 and photos of both are shown in Figure 2.


Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing.

Salmi M - J Med Eng (2016)

Preoperative model of ankle made by binder jetting with monochrome and with colors.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940539&req=5

fig2: Preoperative model of ankle made by binder jetting with monochrome and with colors.
Mentions: Deformation or trauma in the ankle is challenging since there is moving joint in it. It might be hard to understand how different parts of ankle move in the ankle and especially this is hard when the anatomy is abnormal. For imaging ankles, computed tomography was used with layer thickness 625 μm. For repairing, hollowing, coloring, and other model preparation 3Data Expert 10.1 (DeskArtes Oy) was selected as software and Rhinoceros 4.0 was used to create geometry that connects different bones. The model was first verified and repaired with parameters stich gaps thinner than 0.17 mm; fill all gaps after that and remove tiny shell less than 0.01% of total size. The automatic repairing was performed two times and couple of errors were repaired manually. For repaired model line with dots was created in Rhinoceros and then solid pipe was created around it. Then the models were solidified to one shell using Boolean operations in 3Data Expert. Two ankles were segmented with 100 HU for both models using Osirix 5.7 (open source). One model was 3D printed with binder jetting method using Zprinter 450 (3D Systems, Inc.) in monochrome and the other with same 3D printer in color mode. For both material was ZP151 and photos of both are shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros.Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion.Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aalto University, Otakaari 4, 02150 Espoo, Finland.

ABSTRACT
Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed.

No MeSH data available.