Limits...
Genetic admixture and lineage separation in a southern Andean plant

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Mountain orogeny has been a major factor in plant evolution in all continents by changing the landscape and climate, creating new habitats and ecological opportunities. In this study we found that diversity in two southern Andean Escallonia species is geographically structured and there is a deep divergence between infraspecific groups that could be associated with ancient evolutionary events like orogeny. We also found evidence of admixture, likely the result of hybridization at the margins of the parental species' distribution range.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) PCoA of AFLP among 94 Escallonia individuals. The first 2 axes represented in the figure explain 18.65 and 10 % of total variability. Colours indicate groups according to taxonomy: red: E. alpina var. carmelitana; green: E. rubra; blue: E. alpina var. alpina; fuchsia: IM. (B) Genetic structure inferred from bayesian analysis using STRUCTURE software; bars represent the proportion of individuals assigned to each of three genetic clusters (K = 3).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940511&req=5

plw034-F4: (A) PCoA of AFLP among 94 Escallonia individuals. The first 2 axes represented in the figure explain 18.65 and 10 % of total variability. Colours indicate groups according to taxonomy: red: E. alpina var. carmelitana; green: E. rubra; blue: E. alpina var. alpina; fuchsia: IM. (B) Genetic structure inferred from bayesian analysis using STRUCTURE software; bars represent the proportion of individuals assigned to each of three genetic clusters (K = 3).

Mentions: The distribution of individuals among the first and second principal coordinates of the PCoA analysis is shown in Figure 4A; the first 2 eigenvalues are 0.19 and 0.10, and both account for 28.65 % of total variation. Escallonia.rubra and E. alpina individuals are separated along the first axis, while individuals that share morphological diagnostic characters of both species are spread in an intermediate position (Fig. 4). Along the second axis, E.alpina var. carmelitana populations are discretely grouped and well separated from the rest of E. alpina and E. rubra populations.Figure 4.


Genetic admixture and lineage separation in a southern Andean plant
(A) PCoA of AFLP among 94 Escallonia individuals. The first 2 axes represented in the figure explain 18.65 and 10 % of total variability. Colours indicate groups according to taxonomy: red: E. alpina var. carmelitana; green: E. rubra; blue: E. alpina var. alpina; fuchsia: IM. (B) Genetic structure inferred from bayesian analysis using STRUCTURE software; bars represent the proportion of individuals assigned to each of three genetic clusters (K = 3).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940511&req=5

plw034-F4: (A) PCoA of AFLP among 94 Escallonia individuals. The first 2 axes represented in the figure explain 18.65 and 10 % of total variability. Colours indicate groups according to taxonomy: red: E. alpina var. carmelitana; green: E. rubra; blue: E. alpina var. alpina; fuchsia: IM. (B) Genetic structure inferred from bayesian analysis using STRUCTURE software; bars represent the proportion of individuals assigned to each of three genetic clusters (K = 3).
Mentions: The distribution of individuals among the first and second principal coordinates of the PCoA analysis is shown in Figure 4A; the first 2 eigenvalues are 0.19 and 0.10, and both account for 28.65 % of total variation. Escallonia.rubra and E. alpina individuals are separated along the first axis, while individuals that share morphological diagnostic characters of both species are spread in an intermediate position (Fig. 4). Along the second axis, E.alpina var. carmelitana populations are discretely grouped and well separated from the rest of E. alpina and E. rubra populations.Figure 4.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Mountain orogeny has been a major factor in plant evolution in all continents by changing the landscape and climate, creating new habitats and ecological opportunities. In this study we found that diversity in two southern Andean Escallonia species is geographically structured and there is a deep divergence between infraspecific groups that could be associated with ancient evolutionary events like orogeny. We also found evidence of admixture, likely the result of hybridization at the margins of the parental species' distribution range.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus