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The use of plant community attributes to detect habitat quality in coastal environments

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

To detect changes in coastal ecosystems, we evaluated the variation over time in some vegetation features, such as species composition and structure (species richness, cover, growth forms). We found that ecological groups of species such as native focal species (species that provide essential ecological functions) and aliens (species that spread outside their natural distribution), and growth forms proved their efficacy in discriminating between habitat types and in describing their changes over time. The approach used in the current study may provide an instrument for the assessment of plant community quality that can be applied to other coastal ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.


Location of the six investigated protected sites (dark grey) within the study area. The arrows indicate the extension of the coast occupied by sand dune environments, where the plot were collected. For each site, the number of plots used in the analysis is also reported; filled circle = 2000s; filled square = 2012.
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plw040-F1: Location of the six investigated protected sites (dark grey) within the study area. The arrows indicate the extension of the coast occupied by sand dune environments, where the plot were collected. For each site, the number of plots used in the analysis is also reported; filled circle = 2000s; filled square = 2012.

Mentions: The study area corresponds to the Venetian portion of the north Adriatic coast, delimited by the estuaries of the Adige and Tagliamento rivers, north-eastern Italy (Fig. 1). Sites consisted of narrow, recent dunes (Holocene), bordered by river mouths and tidal inlets, mostly fixed by docks (ARPAV 2008). Recent dunes at the sites are in contact with ancient dunes (Pleistocene), alluvial or lacustrine deposits, or run bordering the Venice Lagoon.Figure 1.


The use of plant community attributes to detect habitat quality in coastal environments
Location of the six investigated protected sites (dark grey) within the study area. The arrows indicate the extension of the coast occupied by sand dune environments, where the plot were collected. For each site, the number of plots used in the analysis is also reported; filled circle = 2000s; filled square = 2012.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940507&req=5

plw040-F1: Location of the six investigated protected sites (dark grey) within the study area. The arrows indicate the extension of the coast occupied by sand dune environments, where the plot were collected. For each site, the number of plots used in the analysis is also reported; filled circle = 2000s; filled square = 2012.
Mentions: The study area corresponds to the Venetian portion of the north Adriatic coast, delimited by the estuaries of the Adige and Tagliamento rivers, north-eastern Italy (Fig. 1). Sites consisted of narrow, recent dunes (Holocene), bordered by river mouths and tidal inlets, mostly fixed by docks (ARPAV 2008). Recent dunes at the sites are in contact with ancient dunes (Pleistocene), alluvial or lacustrine deposits, or run bordering the Venice Lagoon.Figure 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

To detect changes in coastal ecosystems, we evaluated the variation over time in some vegetation features, such as species composition and structure (species richness, cover, growth forms). We found that ecological groups of species such as native focal species (species that provide essential ecological functions) and aliens (species that spread outside their natural distribution), and growth forms proved their efficacy in discriminating between habitat types and in describing their changes over time. The approach used in the current study may provide an instrument for the assessment of plant community quality that can be applied to other coastal ecosystems.

No MeSH data available.