Limits...
Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.


Mean number of visits per flower per 30-min observation period by the four main insect visitors to S. asclepiadea, hybrids and S. yunnanensis. Letters above bars represent significant differences among species.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940505&req=5

plw032-F6: Mean number of visits per flower per 30-min observation period by the four main insect visitors to S. asclepiadea, hybrids and S. yunnanensis. Letters above bars represent significant differences among species.

Mentions: We observed totals of 1500, 1129 and 965 flowers for S. asclepiadea, S. yunnanensis and hybrids, respectively during the 10 h of observations of each group. Bumblebee (Fig. 1) visitation rates were significantly higher to S. asclepiadea and hybrids than to S. yunnanensis (F2, 57 = 13.196, P 0.05) (Fig. 6). Visit rates by solitary bees were significantly higher to hybrids than either parental species (F2, 57 = 4.711, P = 0.013). Hoverfly visitation rates to S. yunnanensis tended to be higher than to S. asclepiadea and hybrids, but rates were not significantly different (F2, 57 = 2.350, P = 0.105). Butterflies made mean 0.101 (± 0.072) visits to S. yunnanensis but did not visit S. asclepiadea or hybrids (Fig. 6). S.asclepiadea and hybrids were visited primarily by bumblebees, accounting for 77.34 and 63.15 % of the floral visits, respectively, while for S. yunnanensis, hoverflies and butterflies were responsible for most visits (36.92 and 30.77 % of visits, respectively).Figure 6.


Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species
Mean number of visits per flower per 30-min observation period by the four main insect visitors to S. asclepiadea, hybrids and S. yunnanensis. Letters above bars represent significant differences among species.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940505&req=5

plw032-F6: Mean number of visits per flower per 30-min observation period by the four main insect visitors to S. asclepiadea, hybrids and S. yunnanensis. Letters above bars represent significant differences among species.
Mentions: We observed totals of 1500, 1129 and 965 flowers for S. asclepiadea, S. yunnanensis and hybrids, respectively during the 10 h of observations of each group. Bumblebee (Fig. 1) visitation rates were significantly higher to S. asclepiadea and hybrids than to S. yunnanensis (F2, 57 = 13.196, P 0.05) (Fig. 6). Visit rates by solitary bees were significantly higher to hybrids than either parental species (F2, 57 = 4.711, P = 0.013). Hoverfly visitation rates to S. yunnanensis tended to be higher than to S. asclepiadea and hybrids, but rates were not significantly different (F2, 57 = 2.350, P = 0.105). Butterflies made mean 0.101 (± 0.072) visits to S. yunnanensis but did not visit S. asclepiadea or hybrids (Fig. 6). S.asclepiadea and hybrids were visited primarily by bumblebees, accounting for 77.34 and 63.15 % of the floral visits, respectively, while for S. yunnanensis, hoverflies and butterflies were responsible for most visits (36.92 and 30.77 % of visits, respectively).Figure 6.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.