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Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.


Cumulative flowering curves for S. asclepiadea and S. yunnanensis at Shangri-La Botanic Garden, Yunnan Province, China, based on up to 4 flowering stems from each of 12 plants per species, and including flowers already senesced previous to first survey date (previous) and buds remaining on final survey date (Buds). For hybrids, the first survey date was 29 July, and flowers senesced previously are represented as the value for 26 July.
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plw032-F5: Cumulative flowering curves for S. asclepiadea and S. yunnanensis at Shangri-La Botanic Garden, Yunnan Province, China, based on up to 4 flowering stems from each of 12 plants per species, and including flowers already senesced previous to first survey date (previous) and buds remaining on final survey date (Buds). For hybrids, the first survey date was 29 July, and flowers senesced previously are represented as the value for 26 July.

Mentions: Flowering curves overlapped for both parental species and putative hybrids (Fig. 5). However, cumulative flowering curves for S. asclepiadea were higher than S. yunnanensis for all survey dates, indicating that on average flowering occurred earlier for S. ascplepiadea. The date by which 50 % of flowering was observed for S. asclepiadea was 23 July compared with 2 August for S. yunnanensis and hybrids, a difference of 10 days.Figure 5.


Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species
Cumulative flowering curves for S. asclepiadea and S. yunnanensis at Shangri-La Botanic Garden, Yunnan Province, China, based on up to 4 flowering stems from each of 12 plants per species, and including flowers already senesced previous to first survey date (previous) and buds remaining on final survey date (Buds). For hybrids, the first survey date was 29 July, and flowers senesced previously are represented as the value for 26 July.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940505&req=5

plw032-F5: Cumulative flowering curves for S. asclepiadea and S. yunnanensis at Shangri-La Botanic Garden, Yunnan Province, China, based on up to 4 flowering stems from each of 12 plants per species, and including flowers already senesced previous to first survey date (previous) and buds remaining on final survey date (Buds). For hybrids, the first survey date was 29 July, and flowers senesced previously are represented as the value for 26 July.
Mentions: Flowering curves overlapped for both parental species and putative hybrids (Fig. 5). However, cumulative flowering curves for S. asclepiadea were higher than S. yunnanensis for all survey dates, indicating that on average flowering occurred earlier for S. ascplepiadea. The date by which 50 % of flowering was observed for S. asclepiadea was 23 July compared with 2 August for S. yunnanensis and hybrids, a difference of 10 days.Figure 5.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.