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Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PCA showing genetic relatedness among the studied individuals. Axes 1 and 2 explain 36.80 and 20.68 % of the total variance, respectively.
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plw032-F4: PCA showing genetic relatedness among the studied individuals. Axes 1 and 2 explain 36.80 and 20.68 % of the total variance, respectively.

Mentions: For PCoA of the SSR data, principal coordinate axes 1 and 2 explained 36.80 and 20.68 % of the variation, respectively, and revealed that all studied individuals belonged to three separate gene pools (Fig. 4).Figure 4.


Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species
PCA showing genetic relatedness among the studied individuals. Axes 1 and 2 explain 36.80 and 20.68 % of the total variance, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940505&req=5

plw032-F4: PCA showing genetic relatedness among the studied individuals. Axes 1 and 2 explain 36.80 and 20.68 % of the total variance, respectively.
Mentions: For PCoA of the SSR data, principal coordinate axes 1 and 2 explained 36.80 and 20.68 % of the variation, respectively, and revealed that all studied individuals belonged to three separate gene pools (Fig. 4).Figure 4.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus