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Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.


Bayesian probability of assignment of 88 individuals to a cluster (K = 2) on the basis of multilocus microsatellite genotypes. Populations 1, 2 and 3 are from S. asclepiadea, putative hybrids and S. yunnanensis, respectively.
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plw032-F3: Bayesian probability of assignment of 88 individuals to a cluster (K = 2) on the basis of multilocus microsatellite genotypes. Populations 1, 2 and 3 are from S. asclepiadea, putative hybrids and S. yunnanensis, respectively.

Mentions: For PCA of morphological measures, principal coordinate axes 1 and 2 explained 34.81 % and 20.96 % of the variation, respectively, and revealed that adult individuals belonged to three separate clusters, corresponding to each parental species and a cluster of hybrids (Fig. 2). The morphological groupings were congruent with the individuals identified as being hybrids by the analysis of microsatellite polymorphisms. Evanno’s ΔK was maximum when K = 2, suggesting assignment of all individuals to two clusters. The analysis indicated a high degree of purity of both parental species, with a membership proportion of the S. asclepiadea population (population 1) in the S. asclepiadea cluster of 97.7 %, and a membership proportion of the S. yunnanensis population (population 3) of 97.9 % in the S. yunnanensis cluster (Fig. 3). The analysis did not resolve the hybrids into a distinct cluster; instead, all hybrid individuals were assigned to either S. asclepiadea population (28.5 %) or the S. yunnanensis population (71.5 %), However, 10 of 11 individuals putatively identified as being hybrids based on morphology had microsatellite genotypes strongly suggestive of contributions from both parent species; this was not the case for most individuals identified as belonging to the parent species based on morphology (Fig. 3).Figure 2.


Evidence for asymmetrical hybridization despite pre- and post-pollination reproductive barriers between two Silene species
Bayesian probability of assignment of 88 individuals to a cluster (K = 2) on the basis of multilocus microsatellite genotypes. Populations 1, 2 and 3 are from S. asclepiadea, putative hybrids and S. yunnanensis, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940505&req=5

plw032-F3: Bayesian probability of assignment of 88 individuals to a cluster (K = 2) on the basis of multilocus microsatellite genotypes. Populations 1, 2 and 3 are from S. asclepiadea, putative hybrids and S. yunnanensis, respectively.
Mentions: For PCA of morphological measures, principal coordinate axes 1 and 2 explained 34.81 % and 20.96 % of the variation, respectively, and revealed that adult individuals belonged to three separate clusters, corresponding to each parental species and a cluster of hybrids (Fig. 2). The morphological groupings were congruent with the individuals identified as being hybrids by the analysis of microsatellite polymorphisms. Evanno’s ΔK was maximum when K = 2, suggesting assignment of all individuals to two clusters. The analysis indicated a high degree of purity of both parental species, with a membership proportion of the S. asclepiadea population (population 1) in the S. asclepiadea cluster of 97.7 %, and a membership proportion of the S. yunnanensis population (population 3) of 97.9 % in the S. yunnanensis cluster (Fig. 3). The analysis did not resolve the hybrids into a distinct cluster; instead, all hybrid individuals were assigned to either S. asclepiadea population (28.5 %) or the S. yunnanensis population (71.5 %), However, 10 of 11 individuals putatively identified as being hybrids based on morphology had microsatellite genotypes strongly suggestive of contributions from both parent species; this was not the case for most individuals identified as belonging to the parent species based on morphology (Fig. 3).Figure 2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Co-flowering species may undergo interspecific hybridization if they are closely related and share pollinators. However, a series of reproductive barriers between species can prevent interspecific gene flow, making natural hybridization a transient, rare event. Both morphological and molecular data indicated putative natural hybrids between two Silene species from southwest China, with pollen from S. yunnanensis fertilizing ovules of S. asclepiadae. Zhang et al. found that pollen production and viability were significantly lower in putative hybrids than the parental species. The low fecundity of the hybrids and other reproductive barriers between the two species could contribute to species fidelity.

No MeSH data available.