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Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient

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ABSTRACT

We found that Salvia nubicola distributed along a broad altitudinal gradient developed a range of defence strategies against insect herbivores. The strategies, however, do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with the altitudinal gradient along which herbivore pressure is decreasing. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding trade-offs among them could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with changes in plant-herbivore interactions as a consequence of future climate change.

No MeSH data available.


Effect of clipping (simulated herbivore treatment) on production of secondary metabolites—(A) salicin and (B) rosmarinic acid. C, E and C × E indicate effects of clipping treatment, altitude and their interaction, respectively. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001; n.s. non-significant. Population means and SE are shown. Dotted line represent data from both unclipped and clipped treatment because no effect was clipping treatment was found.
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plw026-F4: Effect of clipping (simulated herbivore treatment) on production of secondary metabolites—(A) salicin and (B) rosmarinic acid. C, E and C × E indicate effects of clipping treatment, altitude and their interaction, respectively. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001; n.s. non-significant. Population means and SE are shown. Dotted line represent data from both unclipped and clipped treatment because no effect was clipping treatment was found.

Mentions: While we recorded no effect of clipping treatment on production of any of the studied phenolic compounds (P > 0.183 in all cases, df = 74), we found a significant relationship between altitude and production of salicin and rosmarinic acid. Plants from higher altitudes produced three times more salicin (R2 = 0.37, F1,75 = 43.22, P < 0.001; Fig. 4A), in contrast to the hypothesis that plants from high altitudes should produce less defence compounds. In concordance with the hypothesis, there was about two times less rosmarinic acid in plants from higher compared to lower altitudes (R2 = 0.06, F1,75 = 4.72, P = 0.03; Fig. 4B). Plants produced 0.35 µg/g FW more salicin and 337 µg/g FW less rosmarinic acid per each 100 m of altitudinal increase.Figure 4.


Trade-off among different anti-herbivore defence strategies along an altitudinal gradient
Effect of clipping (simulated herbivore treatment) on production of secondary metabolites—(A) salicin and (B) rosmarinic acid. C, E and C × E indicate effects of clipping treatment, altitude and their interaction, respectively. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001; n.s. non-significant. Population means and SE are shown. Dotted line represent data from both unclipped and clipped treatment because no effect was clipping treatment was found.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940502&req=5

plw026-F4: Effect of clipping (simulated herbivore treatment) on production of secondary metabolites—(A) salicin and (B) rosmarinic acid. C, E and C × E indicate effects of clipping treatment, altitude and their interaction, respectively. **P < 0.01; ***P < 0.001; n.s. non-significant. Population means and SE are shown. Dotted line represent data from both unclipped and clipped treatment because no effect was clipping treatment was found.
Mentions: While we recorded no effect of clipping treatment on production of any of the studied phenolic compounds (P > 0.183 in all cases, df = 74), we found a significant relationship between altitude and production of salicin and rosmarinic acid. Plants from higher altitudes produced three times more salicin (R2 = 0.37, F1,75 = 43.22, P < 0.001; Fig. 4A), in contrast to the hypothesis that plants from high altitudes should produce less defence compounds. In concordance with the hypothesis, there was about two times less rosmarinic acid in plants from higher compared to lower altitudes (R2 = 0.06, F1,75 = 4.72, P = 0.03; Fig. 4B). Plants produced 0.35 µg/g FW more salicin and 337 µg/g FW less rosmarinic acid per each 100 m of altitudinal increase.Figure 4.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

We found that Salvia nubicola distributed along a broad altitudinal gradient developed a range of defence strategies against insect herbivores. The strategies, however, do not seem to be used simultaneously in all populations even though most of them are correlated with the altitudinal gradient along which herbivore pressure is decreasing. Our study thus shows the importance of simultaneous study of different defence strategies since understanding trade-offs among them could be necessary for detecting the mechanisms by which plants are able to cope with changes in plant-herbivore interactions as a consequence of future climate change.

No MeSH data available.