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Increased resistance to a generalist herbivore in a salinity-stressed non-halophytic plant

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

During their life, plants face multiple stresses. However, studies on one stress factor have typically neglected possible interactions with other factors. We demonstrated that salt stress in Indian mustard (a plant species not adapted to salinity) lessens the effect of herbivory on plant mass, and increases the plants' constitutive resistance to herbivores. Changes in the plants associated with increased salt that help to explain the mitigation of herbivore effects include decreased protein and macronutrient content. Plants exposed to herbivore damage were also less negatively affected by salt exposure, possibly due to their ability to maintain higher levels of transpiration.

No MeSH data available.


Effect of salt and herbivory on total, shoot and root final biomass of herbivore-damaged (closed symbols) and undamaged (open symbols) Brassica juncea plants. Each point is the mean of two plants harvested from a hydroponic container. The dashed and solid lines are the least squares lines from the ANCOVA model for the undamaged and damaged plants, respectively.
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plw028-F1: Effect of salt and herbivory on total, shoot and root final biomass of herbivore-damaged (closed symbols) and undamaged (open symbols) Brassica juncea plants. Each point is the mean of two plants harvested from a hydroponic container. The dashed and solid lines are the least squares lines from the ANCOVA model for the undamaged and damaged plants, respectively.

Mentions: Final plant biomass was also negatively affected by salinity (Fig. 1, F1,26 = 41.6, P < 0.0001 for the effect of salinity). Plants in the 50 and 100 mM NaCl were 18.7 and 45.8% smaller, respectively, than those in the no-salt treatment. These trends, were less pronounced for plants subjected to herbivory, i.e. while herbivory had an negative effect on final plant biomass (F1,26 = 29.3, P < 0.0001 for the herbivory effect), this negative effect decreased as salinity increased (F1,26 = 4.8, P = 0.046 for the interaction between NaCl and herbivory treatment). This change in final biomass between herbivore and non-herbivore exposed plants was driven mainly by changes in root biomass, as there was no interaction between salinity and herbivory on shoot mass but there was for root mass (F1,26 = 7.2, P = 0.013). This shows that the reduced mass of the herbivore-exposed plants was not just a result of removal of leaf tissue.Figure 1.


Increased resistance to a generalist herbivore in a salinity-stressed non-halophytic plant
Effect of salt and herbivory on total, shoot and root final biomass of herbivore-damaged (closed symbols) and undamaged (open symbols) Brassica juncea plants. Each point is the mean of two plants harvested from a hydroponic container. The dashed and solid lines are the least squares lines from the ANCOVA model for the undamaged and damaged plants, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940500&req=5

plw028-F1: Effect of salt and herbivory on total, shoot and root final biomass of herbivore-damaged (closed symbols) and undamaged (open symbols) Brassica juncea plants. Each point is the mean of two plants harvested from a hydroponic container. The dashed and solid lines are the least squares lines from the ANCOVA model for the undamaged and damaged plants, respectively.
Mentions: Final plant biomass was also negatively affected by salinity (Fig. 1, F1,26 = 41.6, P < 0.0001 for the effect of salinity). Plants in the 50 and 100 mM NaCl were 18.7 and 45.8% smaller, respectively, than those in the no-salt treatment. These trends, were less pronounced for plants subjected to herbivory, i.e. while herbivory had an negative effect on final plant biomass (F1,26 = 29.3, P < 0.0001 for the herbivory effect), this negative effect decreased as salinity increased (F1,26 = 4.8, P = 0.046 for the interaction between NaCl and herbivory treatment). This change in final biomass between herbivore and non-herbivore exposed plants was driven mainly by changes in root biomass, as there was no interaction between salinity and herbivory on shoot mass but there was for root mass (F1,26 = 7.2, P = 0.013). This shows that the reduced mass of the herbivore-exposed plants was not just a result of removal of leaf tissue.Figure 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

During their life, plants face multiple stresses. However, studies on one stress factor have typically neglected possible interactions with other factors. We demonstrated that salt stress in Indian mustard (a plant species not adapted to salinity) lessens the effect of herbivory on plant mass, and increases the plants' constitutive resistance to herbivores. Changes in the plants associated with increased salt that help to explain the mitigation of herbivore effects include decreased protein and macronutrient content. Plants exposed to herbivore damage were also less negatively affected by salt exposure, possibly due to their ability to maintain higher levels of transpiration.

No MeSH data available.