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Diurnal dynamics of oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations in shoots and rhizomes of a perennial in a constructed wetland indicate down-regulation of below ground oxygen consumption

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ABSTRACT

Plants have evolved mechanisms to provide oxygen to their parts in oxygen-free environments like wetland sediments. We measured the diurnal courses of oxygen supply to rhizomes of the common reed, a widespread wetland plant. During the day the below-ground plant parts can rely on ample oxygen, but during the night its supply to rhizomes and roots as well as to the whole assembly of associated microorganisms is limited. The key finding of the study was that during periods of low oxygen supply the whole below-ground biota reduces its respiration. This regulation mechanism helps the biota survive unfavourable periods.

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Diurnal oxygen courses in central pith cavities of culms and rhizomes of two P. australis plants and micro-climatic conditions during measurements (A). Plants A1 (B) and A2 (C) analyzed grew in a CW in Slavošovice, Czech Republic. Optodes for recording oxygen concentration were implanted about 30 cm above the substrate in shoots and in vertical rhizome ends elevating the water table. Values were recorded continuously every five minutes over 72 h in August 2009. Time is given in CET without summer time adjustment. RH, relative air humidity; PFD, photosynthetic photon flux density.
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plw025-F1: Diurnal oxygen courses in central pith cavities of culms and rhizomes of two P. australis plants and micro-climatic conditions during measurements (A). Plants A1 (B) and A2 (C) analyzed grew in a CW in Slavošovice, Czech Republic. Optodes for recording oxygen concentration were implanted about 30 cm above the substrate in shoots and in vertical rhizome ends elevating the water table. Values were recorded continuously every five minutes over 72 h in August 2009. Time is given in CET without summer time adjustment. RH, relative air humidity; PFD, photosynthetic photon flux density.

Mentions: During the period of measurements we recorded microclimatic factors inside the stand in a height of 1 m above the gravel surface. These parameters included photon flux density (PFD) over the waveband 400–700 nm, air temperature and relative air humidity (RH). PFD sensors were produced by LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln NE, USA; temperature and RH sensors by Delta-T, Burwell, UK. Additionally, substrate water temperature of the reed bed was logged. PFD outside the stand was gathered in a height of 1.5 m. Stable weather conditions prevailed during diurnal oxygen recording (cf. Fig. 1A). In all data, time of day is presented as Central European Time (CET) without summer time adjustment.Figure 1.


Diurnal dynamics of oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations in shoots and rhizomes of a perennial in a constructed wetland indicate down-regulation of below ground oxygen consumption
Diurnal oxygen courses in central pith cavities of culms and rhizomes of two P. australis plants and micro-climatic conditions during measurements (A). Plants A1 (B) and A2 (C) analyzed grew in a CW in Slavošovice, Czech Republic. Optodes for recording oxygen concentration were implanted about 30 cm above the substrate in shoots and in vertical rhizome ends elevating the water table. Values were recorded continuously every five minutes over 72 h in August 2009. Time is given in CET without summer time adjustment. RH, relative air humidity; PFD, photosynthetic photon flux density.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940480&req=5

plw025-F1: Diurnal oxygen courses in central pith cavities of culms and rhizomes of two P. australis plants and micro-climatic conditions during measurements (A). Plants A1 (B) and A2 (C) analyzed grew in a CW in Slavošovice, Czech Republic. Optodes for recording oxygen concentration were implanted about 30 cm above the substrate in shoots and in vertical rhizome ends elevating the water table. Values were recorded continuously every five minutes over 72 h in August 2009. Time is given in CET without summer time adjustment. RH, relative air humidity; PFD, photosynthetic photon flux density.
Mentions: During the period of measurements we recorded microclimatic factors inside the stand in a height of 1 m above the gravel surface. These parameters included photon flux density (PFD) over the waveband 400–700 nm, air temperature and relative air humidity (RH). PFD sensors were produced by LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln NE, USA; temperature and RH sensors by Delta-T, Burwell, UK. Additionally, substrate water temperature of the reed bed was logged. PFD outside the stand was gathered in a height of 1.5 m. Stable weather conditions prevailed during diurnal oxygen recording (cf. Fig. 1A). In all data, time of day is presented as Central European Time (CET) without summer time adjustment.Figure 1.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Plants have evolved mechanisms to provide oxygen to their parts in oxygen-free environments like wetland sediments. We measured the diurnal courses of oxygen supply to rhizomes of the common reed, a widespread wetland plant. During the day the below-ground plant parts can rely on ample oxygen, but during the night its supply to rhizomes and roots as well as to the whole assembly of associated microorganisms is limited. The key finding of the study was that during periods of low oxygen supply the whole below-ground biota reduces its respiration. This regulation mechanism helps the biota survive unfavourable periods.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus