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Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop

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ABSTRACT

Plants acclimate to the thermal regime they experience. We analysed intra-specific variations in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis in a perennial herbaceous crop by comparing cultivars from contrasting origins grown at a range of temperatures. It was concluded that both temperate and Mediterranean cultivars display strong patterns of thermal acclimation in the 5-40°C range. No evidence of superior performance was found for Mediterranean genotypes at high temperatures.

No MeSH data available.


Temperature dependencies of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax, a and b) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax, c and d) of alfalfa leaves grown at different temperatures. Data are given for two genotypes of Mediterranean (b–d, 7_7) and temperate (a–c, G3) origins at growth temperatures of 5 °C (open circles), 25 °C (grey circles) and 30 °C (filled circles). Normalizations by the rates at 25 °C were performed. The lines represent fits of either Equations (2) or (3), the parameters of which are given in [Supporting Information Table 1].
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plw035-F5: Temperature dependencies of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax, a and b) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax, c and d) of alfalfa leaves grown at different temperatures. Data are given for two genotypes of Mediterranean (b–d, 7_7) and temperate (a–c, G3) origins at growth temperatures of 5 °C (open circles), 25 °C (grey circles) and 30 °C (filled circles). Normalizations by the rates at 25 °C were performed. The lines represent fits of either Equations (2) or (3), the parameters of which are given in [Supporting Information Table 1].

Mentions: At each Tgrowth, the dependencies of photosynthetic parameters on leaf temperature were also determined. The parameters of these response curves are summarized in [Supporting Information Table 1].Figure 5 presents three examples of these curves at contrasting growth temperatures for the two cuttings studied. The responses of Vcmax and Jmax to leaf temperature were modified by growth temperature in both genotypes. The magnitude of the normalized responses increased with the rise in growth temperature for both Vcmax and Jmax. In addition, changes to the response curves differed between the temperate and Mediterranean genotypes. Vcmax displayed a typical increasing Arrhenius response curve (Equation 2) irrespective of Tgrowth in the temperate genotype, whereas a shift toward an optimum curve (best fitted by a Johnson function, Equation 3) was observed in the Mediterranean genotype grown at 25 and 30 °C. Similarly, Jmax responses to leaf temperature appeared to be flatter in the Mediterranean genotype at the highest Tgrowth (25 and 30 °C). The rates did not exceed 1.7 at these temperatures, while they reached 2 in the temperate genotype.Figure 5.


Intraspecific variation in thermal acclimation of photosynthesis across a range of temperatures in a perennial crop
Temperature dependencies of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax, a and b) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax, c and d) of alfalfa leaves grown at different temperatures. Data are given for two genotypes of Mediterranean (b–d, 7_7) and temperate (a–c, G3) origins at growth temperatures of 5 °C (open circles), 25 °C (grey circles) and 30 °C (filled circles). Normalizations by the rates at 25 °C were performed. The lines represent fits of either Equations (2) or (3), the parameters of which are given in [Supporting Information Table 1].
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940478&req=5

plw035-F5: Temperature dependencies of the maximum rate of Rubisco carboxylation (Vcmax, a and b) and maximum electron transport rate (Jmax, c and d) of alfalfa leaves grown at different temperatures. Data are given for two genotypes of Mediterranean (b–d, 7_7) and temperate (a–c, G3) origins at growth temperatures of 5 °C (open circles), 25 °C (grey circles) and 30 °C (filled circles). Normalizations by the rates at 25 °C were performed. The lines represent fits of either Equations (2) or (3), the parameters of which are given in [Supporting Information Table 1].
Mentions: At each Tgrowth, the dependencies of photosynthetic parameters on leaf temperature were also determined. The parameters of these response curves are summarized in [Supporting Information Table 1].Figure 5 presents three examples of these curves at contrasting growth temperatures for the two cuttings studied. The responses of Vcmax and Jmax to leaf temperature were modified by growth temperature in both genotypes. The magnitude of the normalized responses increased with the rise in growth temperature for both Vcmax and Jmax. In addition, changes to the response curves differed between the temperate and Mediterranean genotypes. Vcmax displayed a typical increasing Arrhenius response curve (Equation 2) irrespective of Tgrowth in the temperate genotype, whereas a shift toward an optimum curve (best fitted by a Johnson function, Equation 3) was observed in the Mediterranean genotype grown at 25 and 30 °C. Similarly, Jmax responses to leaf temperature appeared to be flatter in the Mediterranean genotype at the highest Tgrowth (25 and 30 °C). The rates did not exceed 1.7 at these temperatures, while they reached 2 in the temperate genotype.Figure 5.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Plants acclimate to the thermal regime they experience. We analysed intra-specific variations in the thermal acclimation of photosynthesis in a perennial herbaceous crop by comparing cultivars from contrasting origins grown at a range of temperatures. It was concluded that both temperate and Mediterranean cultivars display strong patterns of thermal acclimation in the 5-40°C range. No evidence of superior performance was found for Mediterranean genotypes at high temperatures.

No MeSH data available.