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Population genetics of self-incompatibility in a clade of relict cliff-dwelling plant species

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ABSTRACT

This study highlights the value of performing detailed mating system studies in plant species of high conservation value, such as the rare and relict species of Sonchus section Pustulati described here. This study adds to the evidence that outcrossing mating systems based on SSI are highly resilient even under long-term conditions of small, fragmented, and isolated populations, possibly due to mating system flexibility with the presence of some selfing and the fact that high cross-compatibility is achieved for relatively modest dominantly expressed S allele polymorphism. We highlight the importance of taking mating system factors into account as part of conservation efforts.

No MeSH data available.


Variation of the individual difference on fruit set obtained after forced (FSP) and autonomous (ASP) self-pollinations across the Sonchus section Pustulati taxa. Small circles and asterisks indicate atypical and extreme values, respectively; i.e. outliers that are more than 1.5 and 3 box lengths from the upper hinge (75th percentile), respectively. Only plants that produced fruits after ASP and/or FSP pollinations were included (sample size = N).
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plw029-F4: Variation of the individual difference on fruit set obtained after forced (FSP) and autonomous (ASP) self-pollinations across the Sonchus section Pustulati taxa. Small circles and asterisks indicate atypical and extreme values, respectively; i.e. outliers that are more than 1.5 and 3 box lengths from the upper hinge (75th percentile), respectively. Only plants that produced fruits after ASP and/or FSP pollinations were included (sample size = N).

Mentions: The fruit set values for the MCP treatment were significantly higher than those of the FSP and ASP treatments in every taxon (Table 1; Kruskal–Wallis tests, Χ2 >96.22, DF = 2, P <0.001; Mann–Whitney U tests, U >0.001, DF = 1, P <0.001). Fruit set values after FSP were significantly higher than after ASP in each species (U >1673.00, DF = 1, P <0.020) except S. masguindalii (U = 1609.50, DF = 1, P = 0.117; [see Supporting Information – Figure S2]). In plants that produced fruits by selfing, after either FSP and/or ASP treatments, the difference between the fruit set obtained after these pollinations [i.e. Fruit set (FSP – ASP)] in each individual was 0.27 ± 0.03 in S. fragilis, 0.13 ± 0.05 in S. masguindalii, and 0.11 ± 0.02 and 0.10 ± 0.03 in the Spanish and Moroccan ranges of S. pustulatus, respectively (Fig. 4). This difference was significantly higher in S. fragilis than in the remaining taxa (Χ2 = 21.77, DF = 3, P <0.001; U >321.00, P <0.022). Surprisingly, some of these plants (10%), particularly of S. fragilis (6%), showed even a higher fructification after ASP than after FSP.Figure 4.


Population genetics of self-incompatibility in a clade of relict cliff-dwelling plant species
Variation of the individual difference on fruit set obtained after forced (FSP) and autonomous (ASP) self-pollinations across the Sonchus section Pustulati taxa. Small circles and asterisks indicate atypical and extreme values, respectively; i.e. outliers that are more than 1.5 and 3 box lengths from the upper hinge (75th percentile), respectively. Only plants that produced fruits after ASP and/or FSP pollinations were included (sample size = N).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940477&req=5

plw029-F4: Variation of the individual difference on fruit set obtained after forced (FSP) and autonomous (ASP) self-pollinations across the Sonchus section Pustulati taxa. Small circles and asterisks indicate atypical and extreme values, respectively; i.e. outliers that are more than 1.5 and 3 box lengths from the upper hinge (75th percentile), respectively. Only plants that produced fruits after ASP and/or FSP pollinations were included (sample size = N).
Mentions: The fruit set values for the MCP treatment were significantly higher than those of the FSP and ASP treatments in every taxon (Table 1; Kruskal–Wallis tests, Χ2 >96.22, DF = 2, P <0.001; Mann–Whitney U tests, U >0.001, DF = 1, P <0.001). Fruit set values after FSP were significantly higher than after ASP in each species (U >1673.00, DF = 1, P <0.020) except S. masguindalii (U = 1609.50, DF = 1, P = 0.117; [see Supporting Information – Figure S2]). In plants that produced fruits by selfing, after either FSP and/or ASP treatments, the difference between the fruit set obtained after these pollinations [i.e. Fruit set (FSP – ASP)] in each individual was 0.27 ± 0.03 in S. fragilis, 0.13 ± 0.05 in S. masguindalii, and 0.11 ± 0.02 and 0.10 ± 0.03 in the Spanish and Moroccan ranges of S. pustulatus, respectively (Fig. 4). This difference was significantly higher in S. fragilis than in the remaining taxa (Χ2 = 21.77, DF = 3, P <0.001; U >321.00, P <0.022). Surprisingly, some of these plants (10%), particularly of S. fragilis (6%), showed even a higher fructification after ASP than after FSP.Figure 4.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study highlights the value of performing detailed mating system studies in plant species of high conservation value, such as the rare and relict species of Sonchus section Pustulati described here. This study adds to the evidence that outcrossing mating systems based on SSI are highly resilient even under long-term conditions of small, fragmented, and isolated populations, possibly due to mating system flexibility with the presence of some selfing and the fact that high cross-compatibility is achieved for relatively modest dominantly expressed S allele polymorphism. We highlight the importance of taking mating system factors into account as part of conservation efforts.

No MeSH data available.