Limits...
Near Infrared Imaging As a Method of Studying Tsetse Fly (Diptera: Glossinidae) Pupal Development.

Moran ZR, Parker AG - J. Insect Sci. (2016)

Bottom Line: Various wavelengths of NIR light from 880 to 1060 nm were compared to study the development of tsetse fly pupae from larviposition to emergence, using time-lapse videos and photographs.In addition, it presents a new methodology for studying the pupal stage of many coarctate insects for many applications.NIR imaging permits observation of living pupae, allowing the entire development process to be observed without disruption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Pest Control Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna, Austria (zelda.moran@gmail.com; a.g.parker@iaea.org).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Pupae shown at day 25 of development. Females are in the top row, males are in the bottom row. Females show some pigmentation in the wings and legs, whereas males do not. (B) Pupae shown at day 26. Females on the top row. Females show dark pigmentation in both wings and legs, whereas male wings are only beginning to darken. Legs are not yet pigmented in males. (C) Wings and legs are very dark in females, and darker in males compared to day 26. The difference between male and female is becoming less obvious.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940448&req=5

iew047-F9: (A) Pupae shown at day 25 of development. Females are in the top row, males are in the bottom row. Females show some pigmentation in the wings and legs, whereas males do not. (B) Pupae shown at day 26. Females on the top row. Females show dark pigmentation in both wings and legs, whereas male wings are only beginning to darken. Legs are not yet pigmented in males. (C) Wings and legs are very dark in females, and darker in males compared to day 26. The difference between male and female is becoming less obvious.

Mentions: Figures 6–8 show sequences of photographs showing the development of pupae in ventral, dorsal, and anterior positions. Figure 9 shows the difference between male and female tsetse pupae at day 26. Figures 10 and 11 show photographs taken of M. domestica and B. dorsalis, respectively, to illustrate this technique’s applicability to other species.Fig. 6.


Near Infrared Imaging As a Method of Studying Tsetse Fly (Diptera: Glossinidae) Pupal Development.

Moran ZR, Parker AG - J. Insect Sci. (2016)

(A) Pupae shown at day 25 of development. Females are in the top row, males are in the bottom row. Females show some pigmentation in the wings and legs, whereas males do not. (B) Pupae shown at day 26. Females on the top row. Females show dark pigmentation in both wings and legs, whereas male wings are only beginning to darken. Legs are not yet pigmented in males. (C) Wings and legs are very dark in females, and darker in males compared to day 26. The difference between male and female is becoming less obvious.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940448&req=5

iew047-F9: (A) Pupae shown at day 25 of development. Females are in the top row, males are in the bottom row. Females show some pigmentation in the wings and legs, whereas males do not. (B) Pupae shown at day 26. Females on the top row. Females show dark pigmentation in both wings and legs, whereas male wings are only beginning to darken. Legs are not yet pigmented in males. (C) Wings and legs are very dark in females, and darker in males compared to day 26. The difference between male and female is becoming less obvious.
Mentions: Figures 6–8 show sequences of photographs showing the development of pupae in ventral, dorsal, and anterior positions. Figure 9 shows the difference between male and female tsetse pupae at day 26. Figures 10 and 11 show photographs taken of M. domestica and B. dorsalis, respectively, to illustrate this technique’s applicability to other species.Fig. 6.

Bottom Line: Various wavelengths of NIR light from 880 to 1060 nm were compared to study the development of tsetse fly pupae from larviposition to emergence, using time-lapse videos and photographs.In addition, it presents a new methodology for studying the pupal stage of many coarctate insects for many applications.NIR imaging permits observation of living pupae, allowing the entire development process to be observed without disruption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Pest Control Laboratory, Joint FAO/IAEA Programme of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, International Atomic Energy Agency, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna, Austria (zelda.moran@gmail.com; a.g.parker@iaea.org).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus