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The More (Social Group Memberships), the Merrier: Is This the Case for Asians?

Chang MX, Jetten J, Cruwys T, Haslam C, Praharso N - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits.Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3).In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, The University of Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits. We suggest that this is due, in part, to Asian norms about relationships and support seeking, making Asians more reluctant to enlist social support due to concerns about burdening others. Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3). Study 2 showed that social support mediated the relationship between MGM and well-being for Westerners only. In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support. Finally, reviewing the MGM evidence-base to date, relative to Westerners, MGM was less beneficial for the well-being of Asians. The evidence underscores the importance of culture in influencing how likely individuals utilize their group memberships as psychological resources.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The relationship between multiple group membership and depression is mediated through social support, but only among Western participants. Study 2; N = 137.
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Figure 5: The relationship between multiple group membership and depression is mediated through social support, but only among Western participants. Study 2; N = 137.

Mentions: To examine whether social support would mediate the effect of multiple group membership on depression for Western, but not Asian, participants, a second moderated mediation analysis with 10,000 bootstrap samples was conducted (Hayes, 2013, model 8). The interaction between multiple group membership and culture on social support was significant, B = 0.17, 95% CI [0.002, 0.335], t = 2.00, p = 0.048. Conditional indirect effects (IE) revealed a significant indirect effect of multiple group membership on depression via social support for Western participants, IE = −0.05, standard error [SE] = 0.02, 95% CI [−0.104, 0.013], but not for Asian participants, IE = 0.01, standard error [SE] = 0.02, 95% CI [−0.029, 0.055]. Results showed that the indirect effect through social support was significantly different between Asian and Western participants, B = −0.06, 95% CI [−0.136, −0.008]. Culture did not moderate the effect of multiple group membership on depression when the mediator was in the model, B = −0.04, 95% CI [−0.094, 0.020], t = −1.28, p = 0.202 (See Figure 5).


The More (Social Group Memberships), the Merrier: Is This the Case for Asians?

Chang MX, Jetten J, Cruwys T, Haslam C, Praharso N - Front Psychol (2016)

The relationship between multiple group membership and depression is mediated through social support, but only among Western participants. Study 2; N = 137.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940425&req=5

Figure 5: The relationship between multiple group membership and depression is mediated through social support, but only among Western participants. Study 2; N = 137.
Mentions: To examine whether social support would mediate the effect of multiple group membership on depression for Western, but not Asian, participants, a second moderated mediation analysis with 10,000 bootstrap samples was conducted (Hayes, 2013, model 8). The interaction between multiple group membership and culture on social support was significant, B = 0.17, 95% CI [0.002, 0.335], t = 2.00, p = 0.048. Conditional indirect effects (IE) revealed a significant indirect effect of multiple group membership on depression via social support for Western participants, IE = −0.05, standard error [SE] = 0.02, 95% CI [−0.104, 0.013], but not for Asian participants, IE = 0.01, standard error [SE] = 0.02, 95% CI [−0.029, 0.055]. Results showed that the indirect effect through social support was significantly different between Asian and Western participants, B = −0.06, 95% CI [−0.136, −0.008]. Culture did not moderate the effect of multiple group membership on depression when the mediator was in the model, B = −0.04, 95% CI [−0.094, 0.020], t = −1.28, p = 0.202 (See Figure 5).

Bottom Line: While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits.Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3).In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, The University of Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits. We suggest that this is due, in part, to Asian norms about relationships and support seeking, making Asians more reluctant to enlist social support due to concerns about burdening others. Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3). Study 2 showed that social support mediated the relationship between MGM and well-being for Westerners only. In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support. Finally, reviewing the MGM evidence-base to date, relative to Westerners, MGM was less beneficial for the well-being of Asians. The evidence underscores the importance of culture in influencing how likely individuals utilize their group memberships as psychological resources.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus