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The More (Social Group Memberships), the Merrier: Is This the Case for Asians?

Chang MX, Jetten J, Cruwys T, Haslam C, Praharso N - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits.Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3).In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, The University of Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits. We suggest that this is due, in part, to Asian norms about relationships and support seeking, making Asians more reluctant to enlist social support due to concerns about burdening others. Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3). Study 2 showed that social support mediated the relationship between MGM and well-being for Westerners only. In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support. Finally, reviewing the MGM evidence-base to date, relative to Westerners, MGM was less beneficial for the well-being of Asians. The evidence underscores the importance of culture in influencing how likely individuals utilize their group memberships as psychological resources.

No MeSH data available.


Proposed relationship between multiple group memberships and well-being, with breaks indicated where we hypothesize the relationship to be weaker among Asians than among Westerners.
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Figure 1: Proposed relationship between multiple group memberships and well-being, with breaks indicated where we hypothesize the relationship to be weaker among Asians than among Westerners.

Mentions: Building on these previous findings, to the extent that MGM are seen as another form of relationship with others (Jetten et al., 2015), it is likely that cultural variations in shared assumptions about relationships and support seeking may influence the way individuals utilize their MGM. Specifically, this may affect the degree to which one feels it is appropriate to draw upon support resources derived from shared group memberships, which would in turn influence one's well-being. Consequently, MGM may confer fewer benefits to the psychological well-being of Asians because cultural norms on relationships and support seeking in Asian cultural contexts might lead to reluctance to tap into social support resources from their group memberships (see Figure 1). Importantly, this line of work extends on previous research examining cultural differences that has focused largely on relationships and support seeking from significant individuals (e.g., a family member, friend; Kim et al., 2008). Here, we consider the particular contribution that relationships and social support from groups of others makes to health and well-being—where group memberships can comprise a range of diverse relationships such as those with family and friendship groups as well as religious, community, and recreational groups. More importantly, we focus on those group memberships that are meaningful and which individuals feel psychologically connected to (i.e., social identification; Jetten et al., 2014).


The More (Social Group Memberships), the Merrier: Is This the Case for Asians?

Chang MX, Jetten J, Cruwys T, Haslam C, Praharso N - Front Psychol (2016)

Proposed relationship between multiple group memberships and well-being, with breaks indicated where we hypothesize the relationship to be weaker among Asians than among Westerners.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940425&req=5

Figure 1: Proposed relationship between multiple group memberships and well-being, with breaks indicated where we hypothesize the relationship to be weaker among Asians than among Westerners.
Mentions: Building on these previous findings, to the extent that MGM are seen as another form of relationship with others (Jetten et al., 2015), it is likely that cultural variations in shared assumptions about relationships and support seeking may influence the way individuals utilize their MGM. Specifically, this may affect the degree to which one feels it is appropriate to draw upon support resources derived from shared group memberships, which would in turn influence one's well-being. Consequently, MGM may confer fewer benefits to the psychological well-being of Asians because cultural norms on relationships and support seeking in Asian cultural contexts might lead to reluctance to tap into social support resources from their group memberships (see Figure 1). Importantly, this line of work extends on previous research examining cultural differences that has focused largely on relationships and support seeking from significant individuals (e.g., a family member, friend; Kim et al., 2008). Here, we consider the particular contribution that relationships and social support from groups of others makes to health and well-being—where group memberships can comprise a range of diverse relationships such as those with family and friendship groups as well as religious, community, and recreational groups. More importantly, we focus on those group memberships that are meaningful and which individuals feel psychologically connected to (i.e., social identification; Jetten et al., 2014).

Bottom Line: While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits.Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3).In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Psychology, The University of Queensland Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
While previous studies have consistently shown that belonging to multiple groups enhances well-being, the current research proposes that for Asians, multiple group memberships (MGM) may confer fewer well-being benefits. We suggest that this is due, in part, to Asian norms about relationships and support seeking, making Asians more reluctant to enlist social support due to concerns about burdening others. Overall, MGM was associated with enhanced well-being in Westerners (Study 2), but not Asians (Studies 1-3). Study 2 showed that social support mediated the relationship between MGM and well-being for Westerners only. In Study 3, among Asians, MGM benefited the well-being of those who were least reluctant to enlist support. Finally, reviewing the MGM evidence-base to date, relative to Westerners, MGM was less beneficial for the well-being of Asians. The evidence underscores the importance of culture in influencing how likely individuals utilize their group memberships as psychological resources.

No MeSH data available.