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Disorganization, COMT, and Children's Social Behavior: The Norwegian Hypothesis of Legacy of Disorganized Attachment.

Li Z, Hygen BW, Widaman KF, Berg-Nielsen TS, Wichstrøm L, Belsky J - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: Hygen et al. (2014) proposed that variation in the Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) Val158Met genotype explains this variation, providing preliminary data to this effect.We offer a conceptual replication, analyzing data on 560 children (males: 275) drawn from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development.As predicted, competitive model-fitting indicated that disorganized infants carrying Met alleles engage in more positive behavior and less negative behavior than other children at age 5 and 11, with the reverse true of Val/Val homozygotes, seemingly consistent with caregiving-controlling and punitive-controlling styles, respectively, but only in the case of maternal and not teacher reports, thereby confirmating a relationship-specific hypothesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Ecology, University of California, Davis Davis, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Why is disorganized attachment associated with punitive-controlling behavior in some, but caregiving-controlling in others? Hygen et al. (2014) proposed that variation in the Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) Val158Met genotype explains this variation, providing preliminary data to this effect. We offer a conceptual replication, analyzing data on 560 children (males: 275) drawn from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. As predicted, competitive model-fitting indicated that disorganized infants carrying Met alleles engage in more positive behavior and less negative behavior than other children at age 5 and 11, with the reverse true of Val/Val homozygotes, seemingly consistent with caregiving-controlling and punitive-controlling styles, respectively, but only in the case of maternal and not teacher reports, thereby confirmating a relationship-specific hypothesis.

No MeSH data available.


Actual COMT X disorganization interaction pattern for kindergarten mother-reported positive and negative child behavior (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized). Note: The primary analyses used binary COMT coding (i.e., Val/Val vs. Met carrier) and categorical disorganization score (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized).
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Figure 2: Actual COMT X disorganization interaction pattern for kindergarten mother-reported positive and negative child behavior (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized). Note: The primary analyses used binary COMT coding (i.e., Val/Val vs. Met carrier) and categorical disorganization score (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized).

Mentions: Detailed results of the primary data analyses are displayed in Table 2, but before highlighting them, it is important to consider BIC values and thus the overall fit of the multiple models tested, as these most directly address the overall patterning of the data. Comparisons of the full, hypothesized, and comparison models using the BIC statistic in the case of mother-reported child behavior showed that the hypothesized model fit the data best. For each of the 100 imputed data sets, the hypothesized model had a lower (i.e., better) BIC value than the full model on the mother-rated positive composite (BIC difference: M = −5.57, SD = 0.36) and negative composite (BIC difference: M = −4.51, SD = 0.46). In addition, for each imputed data set, the hypothesized model had a lower, better BIC value than the comparison model (positive behavior BIC difference: M = −6.20, SD = 0.65; negative behavior BIC difference: M = −2.73, SD = 0.52). More specifically and as graphically displayed in Figure 2, disorganized Met carriers(βMet−carriers = 0.85, p = 0.02) scored significantly higher on mother-reported positive behavior than disorganized Val/Val homozygotes(βVal∕Val = −1.01, p = 0.10) (d = 0.722; 95% CI: [0.165, 1.278]), but lower, even if not to a significant extent, in the case of negative behavior (i.e., Val/Val > Met carriers; d= −0.448; 95% CI: [-0.997, 0.101]; βMet−carriers = −0.39, p = 0.11; βVal∕Val = 0.74, p = 0.11).


Disorganization, COMT, and Children's Social Behavior: The Norwegian Hypothesis of Legacy of Disorganized Attachment.

Li Z, Hygen BW, Widaman KF, Berg-Nielsen TS, Wichstrøm L, Belsky J - Front Psychol (2016)

Actual COMT X disorganization interaction pattern for kindergarten mother-reported positive and negative child behavior (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized). Note: The primary analyses used binary COMT coding (i.e., Val/Val vs. Met carrier) and categorical disorganization score (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940399&req=5

Figure 2: Actual COMT X disorganization interaction pattern for kindergarten mother-reported positive and negative child behavior (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized). Note: The primary analyses used binary COMT coding (i.e., Val/Val vs. Met carrier) and categorical disorganization score (“0” = organized; “1” = disorganized).
Mentions: Detailed results of the primary data analyses are displayed in Table 2, but before highlighting them, it is important to consider BIC values and thus the overall fit of the multiple models tested, as these most directly address the overall patterning of the data. Comparisons of the full, hypothesized, and comparison models using the BIC statistic in the case of mother-reported child behavior showed that the hypothesized model fit the data best. For each of the 100 imputed data sets, the hypothesized model had a lower (i.e., better) BIC value than the full model on the mother-rated positive composite (BIC difference: M = −5.57, SD = 0.36) and negative composite (BIC difference: M = −4.51, SD = 0.46). In addition, for each imputed data set, the hypothesized model had a lower, better BIC value than the comparison model (positive behavior BIC difference: M = −6.20, SD = 0.65; negative behavior BIC difference: M = −2.73, SD = 0.52). More specifically and as graphically displayed in Figure 2, disorganized Met carriers(βMet−carriers = 0.85, p = 0.02) scored significantly higher on mother-reported positive behavior than disorganized Val/Val homozygotes(βVal∕Val = −1.01, p = 0.10) (d = 0.722; 95% CI: [0.165, 1.278]), but lower, even if not to a significant extent, in the case of negative behavior (i.e., Val/Val > Met carriers; d= −0.448; 95% CI: [-0.997, 0.101]; βMet−carriers = −0.39, p = 0.11; βVal∕Val = 0.74, p = 0.11).

Bottom Line: Hygen et al. (2014) proposed that variation in the Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) Val158Met genotype explains this variation, providing preliminary data to this effect.We offer a conceptual replication, analyzing data on 560 children (males: 275) drawn from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development.As predicted, competitive model-fitting indicated that disorganized infants carrying Met alleles engage in more positive behavior and less negative behavior than other children at age 5 and 11, with the reverse true of Val/Val homozygotes, seemingly consistent with caregiving-controlling and punitive-controlling styles, respectively, but only in the case of maternal and not teacher reports, thereby confirmating a relationship-specific hypothesis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Human Ecology, University of California, Davis Davis, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT
Why is disorganized attachment associated with punitive-controlling behavior in some, but caregiving-controlling in others? Hygen et al. (2014) proposed that variation in the Catechol-O-methyl transferase(COMT) Val158Met genotype explains this variation, providing preliminary data to this effect. We offer a conceptual replication, analyzing data on 560 children (males: 275) drawn from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. As predicted, competitive model-fitting indicated that disorganized infants carrying Met alleles engage in more positive behavior and less negative behavior than other children at age 5 and 11, with the reverse true of Val/Val homozygotes, seemingly consistent with caregiving-controlling and punitive-controlling styles, respectively, but only in the case of maternal and not teacher reports, thereby confirmating a relationship-specific hypothesis.

No MeSH data available.