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Geometric Constraints on Human Speech Sound Inventories.

Dunbar E, Dupoux E - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: We investigate the idea that the languages of the world have developed coherent sound systems in which having one sound increases or decreases the chances of having certain other sounds, depending on shared properties of those sounds.We document three typological tendencies in sound system geometries: economy, a tendency for the differences between sounds in a system to be definable on a relatively small number of independent dimensions; local symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to have relatively large numbers of pairs of sounds that differ only on one dimension; and global symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to be relatively balanced.We also investigate the relation between the typology of inventory geometries and the typology of individual sounds, showing that the frequency distribution with which individual sounds occur across languages works in favor of both local and global symmetry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique (ENS-EHESS-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), Département des Études Cognitives, École Normale Supérieure-PSL Research University Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
We investigate the idea that the languages of the world have developed coherent sound systems in which having one sound increases or decreases the chances of having certain other sounds, depending on shared properties of those sounds. We investigate the geometries of sound systems that are defined by the inherent properties of sounds. We document three typological tendencies in sound system geometries: economy, a tendency for the differences between sounds in a system to be definable on a relatively small number of independent dimensions; local symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to have relatively large numbers of pairs of sounds that differ only on one dimension; and global symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to be relatively balanced. The finding of economy corroborates previous results; the two symmetry properties have not been previously documented. We also investigate the relation between the typology of inventory geometries and the typology of individual sounds, showing that the frequency distribution with which individual sounds occur across languages works in favor of both local and global symmetry.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Smoothed density plots for the three geometric properties, comparing different random inventories (see text). The horizontal line is the smoothed median. Control (dark blue) and frequency-matched random segment (darker orange) inventories are the same as in Study 1.
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Figure 6: Smoothed density plots for the three geometric properties, comparing different random inventories (see text). The horizontal line is the smoothed median. Control (dark blue) and frequency-matched random segment (darker orange) inventories are the same as in Study 1.

Mentions: Figure 6 shows the distributions of the three geometry statistics for the different types of random inventories. Table 1 lists the median values and the same AUC analysis as in Study 1 for several comparisons between different kinds of random inventories.


Geometric Constraints on Human Speech Sound Inventories.

Dunbar E, Dupoux E - Front Psychol (2016)

Smoothed density plots for the three geometric properties, comparing different random inventories (see text). The horizontal line is the smoothed median. Control (dark blue) and frequency-matched random segment (darker orange) inventories are the same as in Study 1.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940385&req=5

Figure 6: Smoothed density plots for the three geometric properties, comparing different random inventories (see text). The horizontal line is the smoothed median. Control (dark blue) and frequency-matched random segment (darker orange) inventories are the same as in Study 1.
Mentions: Figure 6 shows the distributions of the three geometry statistics for the different types of random inventories. Table 1 lists the median values and the same AUC analysis as in Study 1 for several comparisons between different kinds of random inventories.

Bottom Line: We investigate the idea that the languages of the world have developed coherent sound systems in which having one sound increases or decreases the chances of having certain other sounds, depending on shared properties of those sounds.We document three typological tendencies in sound system geometries: economy, a tendency for the differences between sounds in a system to be definable on a relatively small number of independent dimensions; local symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to have relatively large numbers of pairs of sounds that differ only on one dimension; and global symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to be relatively balanced.We also investigate the relation between the typology of inventory geometries and the typology of individual sounds, showing that the frequency distribution with which individual sounds occur across languages works in favor of both local and global symmetry.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Sciences Cognitives et Psycholinguistique (ENS-EHESS-Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique), Département des Études Cognitives, École Normale Supérieure-PSL Research University Paris, France.

ABSTRACT
We investigate the idea that the languages of the world have developed coherent sound systems in which having one sound increases or decreases the chances of having certain other sounds, depending on shared properties of those sounds. We investigate the geometries of sound systems that are defined by the inherent properties of sounds. We document three typological tendencies in sound system geometries: economy, a tendency for the differences between sounds in a system to be definable on a relatively small number of independent dimensions; local symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to have relatively large numbers of pairs of sounds that differ only on one dimension; and global symmetry, a tendency for sound systems to be relatively balanced. The finding of economy corroborates previous results; the two symmetry properties have not been previously documented. We also investigate the relation between the typology of inventory geometries and the typology of individual sounds, showing that the frequency distribution with which individual sounds occur across languages works in favor of both local and global symmetry.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus