Limits...
Assessing Fungal Population in Soil Planted with Cry1Ac and CPTI Transgenic Cotton and Its Conventional Parental Line Using 18S and ITS rDNA Sequences over Four Seasons.

Qi X, Liu B, Song Q, Zou B, Bu Y, Wu H, Ding L, Zhou G - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Bottom Line: Long-term growth of genetically modified plants (GMPs) has raised concerns regarding their ecological effects.Overall, we conclude that monoculture of one representative transgenic cotton cultivar may have no effect on fungal diversity compared with conventional cotton.Furthermore, the choice of amplified region and methodology has potential to affect the outcome of the comparison between GM-crop and its parental line.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, Jinling Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Medicine, Nanjing UniversityNanjing, China; Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, China Pharmaceutical UniversityNanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Long-term growth of genetically modified plants (GMPs) has raised concerns regarding their ecological effects. Here, FLX-pyrosequencing of region I (18S) and region II (ITS1, 5.8S, and ITS2) rDNA was used to characterize fungal communities in soil samples after 10-year monoculture of one representative transgenic cotton line (TC-10) and 15-year plantation of various transgenic cotton cultivars (TC-15mix) over four seasons. Soil fungal communities in the rhizosphere of non-transgenic control (CC) were also compared. No notable differences were observed in soil fertility variables among CC, TC-10, and TC-15mix. Within seasons, the different estimations were statistically indistinguishable. There were 411 and 2 067 fungal operational taxonomic units in the two regions, respectively. More than 75% of fungal taxa were stable in both CC and TC except for individual taxa with significantly different abundance between TC and CC. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between CC and TC-10, while discrimination of separating TC-15mix from CC and TC-10 with 37.86% explained variance in PCoA and a significant difference of Shannon indexes between TC-10 and TC-15mix were observed in region II. As TC-15mix planted with a mixture of transgenic cottons (Zhongmian-29, 30, and 33B) for over 5 years, different genetic modifications may introduce variations in fungal diversity. Further clarification is necessary by detecting the fungal dynamic changes in sites planted in monoculture of various transgenic cottons. Overall, we conclude that monoculture of one representative transgenic cotton cultivar may have no effect on fungal diversity compared with conventional cotton. Furthermore, the choice of amplified region and methodology has potential to affect the outcome of the comparison between GM-crop and its parental line.

No MeSH data available.


Differences among CC, TC-10, and TC-15mix at the family level. (A) Region I; (B) Region II. The graphs show families with differences ≥0.03% and abundances ≥0.03% in the CC and TC samples. Some of the families could not be divided into lower levels and were represented by others according to their respective orders. ∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC and TC-10; ∗∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC and TC-10; ΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC-10 and TC-15mix; ΔΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC-10 and TC-15mix.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940383&req=5

Figure 2: Differences among CC, TC-10, and TC-15mix at the family level. (A) Region I; (B) Region II. The graphs show families with differences ≥0.03% and abundances ≥0.03% in the CC and TC samples. Some of the families could not be divided into lower levels and were represented by others according to their respective orders. ∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC and TC-10; ∗∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC and TC-10; ΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC-10 and TC-15mix; ΔΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC-10 and TC-15mix.

Mentions: In region I, 64% of the highly abundant fungal taxa shown in Table 2 were identified at different sampling sites (CC-soil, TC-10-soil, and TC-15mix-soil), and these taxa were present in more than half of the samples. However, in region II, there were 54, 47, and 40 taxa in the CC-soil, TC-10-soil, and TC-15mix-soil, respectively, and each taxon was present in more than half of the samples from the same sites. In total, 19 orders of fungi encompassing distinct evolutionary lineages and a diversity of morphologies were discovered (Table 3). Based on the two regions, the percentages of taxa shared in CC and TC were 100% and 100%, 100% and 86%, 89% and 81%, 91% and 80%, and 84% and 76% in region I and region II at the level of the phylum, class, order, family and genus, respectively. Abundant families of soil fungi in region I and region II were shown in Figures 2A,B respectively. Both regions contained only a few fungi that differed in abundance among the soil samples from CC, TC-10 and TC-15mix at the level of the family. For example, in region II, Sarcosomataceae, Myxotrichaceae and mitosporic_Tremellale were highly abundant in the soil samples from TC-15mix, while Pleosporaceae and Choanephoraceae represented the majority in CC.


Assessing Fungal Population in Soil Planted with Cry1Ac and CPTI Transgenic Cotton and Its Conventional Parental Line Using 18S and ITS rDNA Sequences over Four Seasons.

Qi X, Liu B, Song Q, Zou B, Bu Y, Wu H, Ding L, Zhou G - Front Plant Sci (2016)

Differences among CC, TC-10, and TC-15mix at the family level. (A) Region I; (B) Region II. The graphs show families with differences ≥0.03% and abundances ≥0.03% in the CC and TC samples. Some of the families could not be divided into lower levels and were represented by others according to their respective orders. ∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC and TC-10; ∗∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC and TC-10; ΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC-10 and TC-15mix; ΔΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC-10 and TC-15mix.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940383&req=5

Figure 2: Differences among CC, TC-10, and TC-15mix at the family level. (A) Region I; (B) Region II. The graphs show families with differences ≥0.03% and abundances ≥0.03% in the CC and TC samples. Some of the families could not be divided into lower levels and were represented by others according to their respective orders. ∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC and TC-10; ∗∗Significant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC and TC-10; ΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.05 between CC-10 and TC-15mix; ΔΔSignificant difference with a P-value of <0.01 between CC-10 and TC-15mix.
Mentions: In region I, 64% of the highly abundant fungal taxa shown in Table 2 were identified at different sampling sites (CC-soil, TC-10-soil, and TC-15mix-soil), and these taxa were present in more than half of the samples. However, in region II, there were 54, 47, and 40 taxa in the CC-soil, TC-10-soil, and TC-15mix-soil, respectively, and each taxon was present in more than half of the samples from the same sites. In total, 19 orders of fungi encompassing distinct evolutionary lineages and a diversity of morphologies were discovered (Table 3). Based on the two regions, the percentages of taxa shared in CC and TC were 100% and 100%, 100% and 86%, 89% and 81%, 91% and 80%, and 84% and 76% in region I and region II at the level of the phylum, class, order, family and genus, respectively. Abundant families of soil fungi in region I and region II were shown in Figures 2A,B respectively. Both regions contained only a few fungi that differed in abundance among the soil samples from CC, TC-10 and TC-15mix at the level of the family. For example, in region II, Sarcosomataceae, Myxotrichaceae and mitosporic_Tremellale were highly abundant in the soil samples from TC-15mix, while Pleosporaceae and Choanephoraceae represented the majority in CC.

Bottom Line: Long-term growth of genetically modified plants (GMPs) has raised concerns regarding their ecological effects.Overall, we conclude that monoculture of one representative transgenic cotton cultivar may have no effect on fungal diversity compared with conventional cotton.Furthermore, the choice of amplified region and methodology has potential to affect the outcome of the comparison between GM-crop and its parental line.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pharmacology, Jinling Hospital, State Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Life Science, School of Medicine, Nanjing UniversityNanjing, China; Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, China Pharmaceutical UniversityNanjing, China.

ABSTRACT
Long-term growth of genetically modified plants (GMPs) has raised concerns regarding their ecological effects. Here, FLX-pyrosequencing of region I (18S) and region II (ITS1, 5.8S, and ITS2) rDNA was used to characterize fungal communities in soil samples after 10-year monoculture of one representative transgenic cotton line (TC-10) and 15-year plantation of various transgenic cotton cultivars (TC-15mix) over four seasons. Soil fungal communities in the rhizosphere of non-transgenic control (CC) were also compared. No notable differences were observed in soil fertility variables among CC, TC-10, and TC-15mix. Within seasons, the different estimations were statistically indistinguishable. There were 411 and 2 067 fungal operational taxonomic units in the two regions, respectively. More than 75% of fungal taxa were stable in both CC and TC except for individual taxa with significantly different abundance between TC and CC. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between CC and TC-10, while discrimination of separating TC-15mix from CC and TC-10 with 37.86% explained variance in PCoA and a significant difference of Shannon indexes between TC-10 and TC-15mix were observed in region II. As TC-15mix planted with a mixture of transgenic cottons (Zhongmian-29, 30, and 33B) for over 5 years, different genetic modifications may introduce variations in fungal diversity. Further clarification is necessary by detecting the fungal dynamic changes in sites planted in monoculture of various transgenic cottons. Overall, we conclude that monoculture of one representative transgenic cotton cultivar may have no effect on fungal diversity compared with conventional cotton. Furthermore, the choice of amplified region and methodology has potential to affect the outcome of the comparison between GM-crop and its parental line.

No MeSH data available.