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Dormant micro arteriovenous malformations lead to recurrent cerebral haemorrhage.

Cai J, Lin H, Li S, Zou Z, Zhang Y, Liu S, Chen X, Bai X - Springerplus (2016)

Bottom Line: Digital subtraction angiographies (DSAs) were performed one week and one month respectively after his haemorrhage, but no positive results were obtained.A micro AVM with two diffused niduses was detected and embolised three months after his re-haemorrhage.The patient recovered without any neurological deficit.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital of Guangzhou University Mega Center, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, 510006 China.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Some micro arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) located in deep brain are undetectable. How to choose a proper timing to detect these AVMs remains unclear.

Case description: A 21-year-old male patient was admitted to our center for intraventricular haematoma. Digital subtraction angiographies (DSAs) were performed one week and one month respectively after his haemorrhage, but no positive results were obtained. The patient was hospitalized for re-haemorrhage six years later. A micro AVM with two diffused niduses was detected and embolised three months after his re-haemorrhage. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit.

Discussion and evaluation: Compressive effects of haematoma and spontaneous obliteration of AVMs might play pivotal roles in negative DSA results.

Conclusions: Strategic and timely use of DSA could identify some dormant re-haemorrhagic AVMs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT images showed morphologies of cerebral haemorrhage. The preceding haemorrhage was located in the ventricle (A-a, b). Ventricular drainage was employed to remove the intraventricular haematoma (A-c–f). 3D CT images showed the morphology of recurrent cerebral haemorrhage (B-a–f). B Expansile ventricles
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Fig1: CT images showed morphologies of cerebral haemorrhage. The preceding haemorrhage was located in the ventricle (A-a, b). Ventricular drainage was employed to remove the intraventricular haematoma (A-c–f). 3D CT images showed the morphology of recurrent cerebral haemorrhage (B-a–f). B Expansile ventricles

Mentions: A 21-year-old male patient was admitted to our center with acute headache and loss of consciousness in 2009. Intraventricular haematoma was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scan (Fig. 1A-a, b). The patient recovered consciousness after ventricular drainage and the removal of intraventricular haematoma (Fig. 1A-c–f). One week after the haemorrhage, the patient was diagnosed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the causes of haemorrhage, but no positive results were obtained (Fig. 2A-a). DSA was repeated 1 month later with a micro-catheter to obtain super-selective angiograpy of micro cerebral arteries, including posterior choroidal arteries. However, no cerebrovascular disease was identified (Fig. 2A-b; Additional file 1). The patient was discharged 1 month after his haemorrhage without any measurable neurological deficit.Fig. 1


Dormant micro arteriovenous malformations lead to recurrent cerebral haemorrhage.

Cai J, Lin H, Li S, Zou Z, Zhang Y, Liu S, Chen X, Bai X - Springerplus (2016)

CT images showed morphologies of cerebral haemorrhage. The preceding haemorrhage was located in the ventricle (A-a, b). Ventricular drainage was employed to remove the intraventricular haematoma (A-c–f). 3D CT images showed the morphology of recurrent cerebral haemorrhage (B-a–f). B Expansile ventricles
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940323&req=5

Fig1: CT images showed morphologies of cerebral haemorrhage. The preceding haemorrhage was located in the ventricle (A-a, b). Ventricular drainage was employed to remove the intraventricular haematoma (A-c–f). 3D CT images showed the morphology of recurrent cerebral haemorrhage (B-a–f). B Expansile ventricles
Mentions: A 21-year-old male patient was admitted to our center with acute headache and loss of consciousness in 2009. Intraventricular haematoma was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) scan (Fig. 1A-a, b). The patient recovered consciousness after ventricular drainage and the removal of intraventricular haematoma (Fig. 1A-c–f). One week after the haemorrhage, the patient was diagnosed with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) for the causes of haemorrhage, but no positive results were obtained (Fig. 2A-a). DSA was repeated 1 month later with a micro-catheter to obtain super-selective angiograpy of micro cerebral arteries, including posterior choroidal arteries. However, no cerebrovascular disease was identified (Fig. 2A-b; Additional file 1). The patient was discharged 1 month after his haemorrhage without any measurable neurological deficit.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Digital subtraction angiographies (DSAs) were performed one week and one month respectively after his haemorrhage, but no positive results were obtained.A micro AVM with two diffused niduses was detected and embolised three months after his re-haemorrhage.The patient recovered without any neurological deficit.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery, Hospital of Guangzhou University Mega Center, Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, 510006 China.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Some micro arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) located in deep brain are undetectable. How to choose a proper timing to detect these AVMs remains unclear.

Case description: A 21-year-old male patient was admitted to our center for intraventricular haematoma. Digital subtraction angiographies (DSAs) were performed one week and one month respectively after his haemorrhage, but no positive results were obtained. The patient was hospitalized for re-haemorrhage six years later. A micro AVM with two diffused niduses was detected and embolised three months after his re-haemorrhage. The patient recovered without any neurological deficit.

Discussion and evaluation: Compressive effects of haematoma and spontaneous obliteration of AVMs might play pivotal roles in negative DSA results.

Conclusions: Strategic and timely use of DSA could identify some dormant re-haemorrhagic AVMs.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus