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Effects of compression clothing on speed-power performance of elite Paralympic sprinters: a pilot study.

Loturco I, Winckler C, Lourenço TF, Veríssimo A, Kobal R, Kitamura K, Pereira LA, Nakamura FY - Springerplus (2016)

Bottom Line: Compression garments are thought to aid performance in some selected speed-power activities owing to improved sensory feedback and proprioception.Magnitude-based inference was used to analyze the results.However, chronic effects in Paralympic athletes wearing compression garments need to be further tested, in order to support its use as a specific training aid.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NAR - Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, Av. Padre José Maria, 555 - Santo Amaro, São Paulo, SP 04753-060 Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Compression garments are thought to aid performance in some selected speed-power activities owing to improved sensory feedback and proprioception. The aim of this study was to test the effects of using compression garments on speed and power-related performances in elite sprinters with visual impairment, who rely more on proprioception to perform than their Olympic peers. Eight top-level Paralympic sprinters competing in 100- and 200-m races performed, in the following order: unloaded squat jump (SJ), loaded jump squat (JS) and sprint tests over 20- and 70-m distances; using or not the compression garment. The maximum mean propulsive power value obtained during the JS attempts (starting at 40 % of their body mass, after which a load of 10 % of body mass was progressively added) was considered for data analysis purposes. The athletes executed the SJ and JS attempts without any help from their guides. Magnitude-based inference was used to analyze the results.

Findings: The unloaded SJ was possibly higher in the compression than the placebo condition (41.19 ± 5.09 vs. 39.49 ± 5.75 cm). Performance differences in the loaded JS and sprint tests were all rated as unclear.

Conclusions: It was concluded that the acute enhancement in vertical jump ability should be explored in the preparation of Paralympic sprinters during power-related training sessions. However, chronic effects in Paralympic athletes wearing compression garments need to be further tested, in order to support its use as a specific training aid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Individual performance differences between the placebo and compression conditions in the squat jump (SJ) exercise
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Fig2: Individual performance differences between the placebo and compression conditions in the squat jump (SJ) exercise

Mentions: Table 1 shows the comparisons between the unloaded (SJ) and loaded (MPP JS) vertical jumps and 20- and 70-m sprint performances in the placebo and compression conditions. The SJ was possibly higher in the compression than in the placebo condition (placebo: 39.49 ± 5.75 cm; compression: 41.19 ± 5.09 cm). The difference between the placebo and compression conditions in the MPP JS was rated as unclear (placebo: 484.06 ± 158.20 W; compression: 474.24 ± 147.70 W). Finally, the differences in the 20- and 70-m sprint times between the placebo and compression were all rated as unclear (placebo: 3.24 ± 0.20 s; compression: 3.27 ± 0.11 s, for 20-m; and placebo: 9.12 ± 0.44 s; compression: 9.07 ± 0.39 s, for 70-m). Figure 2 displays the individual performances in the placebo and compression conditions for the SJ.Table 1


Effects of compression clothing on speed-power performance of elite Paralympic sprinters: a pilot study.

Loturco I, Winckler C, Lourenço TF, Veríssimo A, Kobal R, Kitamura K, Pereira LA, Nakamura FY - Springerplus (2016)

Individual performance differences between the placebo and compression conditions in the squat jump (SJ) exercise
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940310&req=5

Fig2: Individual performance differences between the placebo and compression conditions in the squat jump (SJ) exercise
Mentions: Table 1 shows the comparisons between the unloaded (SJ) and loaded (MPP JS) vertical jumps and 20- and 70-m sprint performances in the placebo and compression conditions. The SJ was possibly higher in the compression than in the placebo condition (placebo: 39.49 ± 5.75 cm; compression: 41.19 ± 5.09 cm). The difference between the placebo and compression conditions in the MPP JS was rated as unclear (placebo: 484.06 ± 158.20 W; compression: 474.24 ± 147.70 W). Finally, the differences in the 20- and 70-m sprint times between the placebo and compression were all rated as unclear (placebo: 3.24 ± 0.20 s; compression: 3.27 ± 0.11 s, for 20-m; and placebo: 9.12 ± 0.44 s; compression: 9.07 ± 0.39 s, for 70-m). Figure 2 displays the individual performances in the placebo and compression conditions for the SJ.Table 1

Bottom Line: Compression garments are thought to aid performance in some selected speed-power activities owing to improved sensory feedback and proprioception.Magnitude-based inference was used to analyze the results.However, chronic effects in Paralympic athletes wearing compression garments need to be further tested, in order to support its use as a specific training aid.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NAR - Nucleus of High Performance in Sport, Av. Padre José Maria, 555 - Santo Amaro, São Paulo, SP 04753-060 Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Background: Compression garments are thought to aid performance in some selected speed-power activities owing to improved sensory feedback and proprioception. The aim of this study was to test the effects of using compression garments on speed and power-related performances in elite sprinters with visual impairment, who rely more on proprioception to perform than their Olympic peers. Eight top-level Paralympic sprinters competing in 100- and 200-m races performed, in the following order: unloaded squat jump (SJ), loaded jump squat (JS) and sprint tests over 20- and 70-m distances; using or not the compression garment. The maximum mean propulsive power value obtained during the JS attempts (starting at 40 % of their body mass, after which a load of 10 % of body mass was progressively added) was considered for data analysis purposes. The athletes executed the SJ and JS attempts without any help from their guides. Magnitude-based inference was used to analyze the results.

Findings: The unloaded SJ was possibly higher in the compression than the placebo condition (41.19 ± 5.09 vs. 39.49 ± 5.75 cm). Performance differences in the loaded JS and sprint tests were all rated as unclear.

Conclusions: It was concluded that the acute enhancement in vertical jump ability should be explored in the preparation of Paralympic sprinters during power-related training sessions. However, chronic effects in Paralympic athletes wearing compression garments need to be further tested, in order to support its use as a specific training aid.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus