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Phytochemical Analysis and Antifungal Activity of Extracts from Leaves and Fruit Residues of Brazilian Savanna Plants Aiming Its Use as Safe Fungicides.

Breda CA, Gasperini AM, Garcia VL, Monteiro KM, Bataglion GA, Eberlin MN, Duarte MC - Nat Prod Bioprospect (2016)

Bottom Line: The increasing demand for safe food without preservatives or pesticides residues has encouraged several studies on natural products with antifungal activity and low toxicity.When incorporated in solid media, these extracts extended the lag phase of A. alternata and A. solani and reduced the growth rate of A. solani.The oral acute toxicity was relatively low, being considered safe for use as a potential natural fungicide.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Food Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, Monteiro Lobato Street, 80, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, São Paulo, 13083-862, Brazil. carol_breda@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT
The increasing demand for safe food without preservatives or pesticides residues has encouraged several studies on natural products with antifungal activity and low toxicity. In this study, ethanolic extracts from leaves and fruit residues (peel and seeds) of three Brazilian savanna species (Acrocomia aculeata, Campomanesia adamantium and Caryocar brasiliense) were evaluated against phytopathogenic fungi. Additionally, the most active extract was chemically characterized by ESI-MS and its oral acute toxicity was evaluated. Extracts from C. brasiliense (pequi) peel and leaves were active against Alternaria alternata, Alternaria solani and Venturia pirina with minimal inhibitory concentrations between 350 and 1000 µg/mL. When incorporated in solid media, these extracts extended the lag phase of A. alternata and A. solani and reduced the growth rate of A. solani. Pequi peel extract showed better antifungal activity and their ESI-MS analysis revealed the presence of substances widely reported as antifungal such as gallic acid, quinic acid, ellagic acid, glucogalin and corilagin. The oral acute toxicity was relatively low, being considered safe for use as a potential natural fungicide.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Radial growth of the fungus A. alternata in MEA medium containing different concentrations of extracts from pequi peels (a) and pequi leaves (b). Control: medium without extract (); Medium containing extract from pequi peels at concentrations of 500 () and 1000 () µg mL−1; Medium containing extract from pequi leaves at concentrations of 1000 () and 2000 () µg mL−1
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Fig1: Radial growth of the fungus A. alternata in MEA medium containing different concentrations of extracts from pequi peels (a) and pequi leaves (b). Control: medium without extract (); Medium containing extract from pequi peels at concentrations of 500 () and 1000 () µg mL−1; Medium containing extract from pequi leaves at concentrations of 1000 () and 2000 () µg mL−1

Mentions: Based on pre-determined criteria, extracts from pequi leaves (PL) and peels (PP) were chosen to evaluate the effects on radial growth of A. alternata, A. solani and V. pirina. Average values of colony radius versus growth time of A. alternata on malt extract agar (MEA) incorporated with extracts from pequi peels (500 and 1000 µg/mL) and leaves (1000 and 2000 µg/mL) are shown in Figs. 1a, b. The growth curves show an initial lag phase (adaptation) that had a longer time in the presence of the extracts (48 h) than in the control assay (24 h), followed by a linear growth. Moreover, it can be observed that at the end of experiment, the assays with higher concentrations of extracts (PP 1000 and PL 2000 µg/mL) showed lower colony radius (21.00 and 19.00 mm, respectively) when compared with the control assay (25.00 mm) (p < 0.05).Fig. 1


Phytochemical Analysis and Antifungal Activity of Extracts from Leaves and Fruit Residues of Brazilian Savanna Plants Aiming Its Use as Safe Fungicides.

Breda CA, Gasperini AM, Garcia VL, Monteiro KM, Bataglion GA, Eberlin MN, Duarte MC - Nat Prod Bioprospect (2016)

Radial growth of the fungus A. alternata in MEA medium containing different concentrations of extracts from pequi peels (a) and pequi leaves (b). Control: medium without extract (); Medium containing extract from pequi peels at concentrations of 500 () and 1000 () µg mL−1; Medium containing extract from pequi leaves at concentrations of 1000 () and 2000 () µg mL−1
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940252&req=5

Fig1: Radial growth of the fungus A. alternata in MEA medium containing different concentrations of extracts from pequi peels (a) and pequi leaves (b). Control: medium without extract (); Medium containing extract from pequi peels at concentrations of 500 () and 1000 () µg mL−1; Medium containing extract from pequi leaves at concentrations of 1000 () and 2000 () µg mL−1
Mentions: Based on pre-determined criteria, extracts from pequi leaves (PL) and peels (PP) were chosen to evaluate the effects on radial growth of A. alternata, A. solani and V. pirina. Average values of colony radius versus growth time of A. alternata on malt extract agar (MEA) incorporated with extracts from pequi peels (500 and 1000 µg/mL) and leaves (1000 and 2000 µg/mL) are shown in Figs. 1a, b. The growth curves show an initial lag phase (adaptation) that had a longer time in the presence of the extracts (48 h) than in the control assay (24 h), followed by a linear growth. Moreover, it can be observed that at the end of experiment, the assays with higher concentrations of extracts (PP 1000 and PL 2000 µg/mL) showed lower colony radius (21.00 and 19.00 mm, respectively) when compared with the control assay (25.00 mm) (p < 0.05).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The increasing demand for safe food without preservatives or pesticides residues has encouraged several studies on natural products with antifungal activity and low toxicity.When incorporated in solid media, these extracts extended the lag phase of A. alternata and A. solani and reduced the growth rate of A. solani.The oral acute toxicity was relatively low, being considered safe for use as a potential natural fungicide.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Food Engineering, State University of Campinas, UNICAMP, Monteiro Lobato Street, 80, Barão Geraldo, Campinas, São Paulo, 13083-862, Brazil. carol_breda@yahoo.com.br.

ABSTRACT
The increasing demand for safe food without preservatives or pesticides residues has encouraged several studies on natural products with antifungal activity and low toxicity. In this study, ethanolic extracts from leaves and fruit residues (peel and seeds) of three Brazilian savanna species (Acrocomia aculeata, Campomanesia adamantium and Caryocar brasiliense) were evaluated against phytopathogenic fungi. Additionally, the most active extract was chemically characterized by ESI-MS and its oral acute toxicity was evaluated. Extracts from C. brasiliense (pequi) peel and leaves were active against Alternaria alternata, Alternaria solani and Venturia pirina with minimal inhibitory concentrations between 350 and 1000 µg/mL. When incorporated in solid media, these extracts extended the lag phase of A. alternata and A. solani and reduced the growth rate of A. solani. Pequi peel extract showed better antifungal activity and their ESI-MS analysis revealed the presence of substances widely reported as antifungal such as gallic acid, quinic acid, ellagic acid, glucogalin and corilagin. The oral acute toxicity was relatively low, being considered safe for use as a potential natural fungicide.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus