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Feasibility of using combined EMG and kinematic signals for prosthesis control: A simulation study using a virtual reality environment.

Blana D, Kyriacou T, Lambrecht JM, Chadwick EK - J Electromyogr Kinesiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Transhumeral amputation has a significant effect on a person's independence and quality of life.The offline training had a target of 4° for flexion/extension and 8° for pronation/supination, which it easily exceeded (2.7° and 5.5° respectively).During online testing, all subjects completed the target-reaching task with path efficiency of 78% and minimal overshoot (1.5%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, UK. Electronic address: d.blana@keele.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The virtual reality environment, with a first-person view of a virtual person sitting at a desk. The participant controls the arm that is fully opaque, and tries to match the position and orientation of the less opaque (“target”) arm.
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f0010: The virtual reality environment, with a first-person view of a virtual person sitting at a desk. The participant controls the arm that is fully opaque, and tries to match the position and orientation of the less opaque (“target”) arm.

Mentions: The participants were asked to perform reaching movements from a self-selected “initial” position on their lap to various locations in the space in front of them. While performing these movements, they wore a virtual reality headset, the Oculus Rift DVK1 (Oculus VR, Inc., CA, USA), which gave them a first-person view of a virtual person sitting at a desk and tracked their head movements. The virtual reality environment (VRE) was built using GameStudio (Conitec Datasystems, Inc., La Mesa, CA, USA). Targets shown in the VRE directed the reaching movements of the participants. The target was shown as a cylinder held in the hand of a “target arm”, a less opaque arm than the virtual arm controlled by the participant (Fig. 2). The targets were located within a virtual rectangular workspace defined in a coordinate frame originating at the virtual shoulder, with the x-axis pointing laterally, the y-axis superiorly and the z-axis posteriorly. In this frame, the workspace limits were x: −10 to 20 cm, y: −10 to 20 cm and z: −50 to −40 cm. The targets were oriented according to the pronation/supination angle of the target arm, and were either (palm facing upwards) or (neutral) of pronation. The neutral pronation angle was chosen because it allows the performance of activities of daily living such as holding a fork or spoon, which was identified in a survey performed by Atkins et al. [2] as one of the top five activities prosthesis users would like to be able to perform. Similarly, the orientation of the palm facing upwards was chosen because it would allow the prosthesis user to receive small objects such as change during shopping. When the participant moved the virtual arm to within 5 cm of the target location and of the target orientation, the target changed colour to indicate they were within the target, which they then had to maintain for 0.5 s. If they were successful, a new target appeared. The participants were required to return to the initial position and then reach to the new target.


Feasibility of using combined EMG and kinematic signals for prosthesis control: A simulation study using a virtual reality environment.

Blana D, Kyriacou T, Lambrecht JM, Chadwick EK - J Electromyogr Kinesiol (2015)

The virtual reality environment, with a first-person view of a virtual person sitting at a desk. The participant controls the arm that is fully opaque, and tries to match the position and orientation of the less opaque (“target”) arm.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940208&req=5

f0010: The virtual reality environment, with a first-person view of a virtual person sitting at a desk. The participant controls the arm that is fully opaque, and tries to match the position and orientation of the less opaque (“target”) arm.
Mentions: The participants were asked to perform reaching movements from a self-selected “initial” position on their lap to various locations in the space in front of them. While performing these movements, they wore a virtual reality headset, the Oculus Rift DVK1 (Oculus VR, Inc., CA, USA), which gave them a first-person view of a virtual person sitting at a desk and tracked their head movements. The virtual reality environment (VRE) was built using GameStudio (Conitec Datasystems, Inc., La Mesa, CA, USA). Targets shown in the VRE directed the reaching movements of the participants. The target was shown as a cylinder held in the hand of a “target arm”, a less opaque arm than the virtual arm controlled by the participant (Fig. 2). The targets were located within a virtual rectangular workspace defined in a coordinate frame originating at the virtual shoulder, with the x-axis pointing laterally, the y-axis superiorly and the z-axis posteriorly. In this frame, the workspace limits were x: −10 to 20 cm, y: −10 to 20 cm and z: −50 to −40 cm. The targets were oriented according to the pronation/supination angle of the target arm, and were either (palm facing upwards) or (neutral) of pronation. The neutral pronation angle was chosen because it allows the performance of activities of daily living such as holding a fork or spoon, which was identified in a survey performed by Atkins et al. [2] as one of the top five activities prosthesis users would like to be able to perform. Similarly, the orientation of the palm facing upwards was chosen because it would allow the prosthesis user to receive small objects such as change during shopping. When the participant moved the virtual arm to within 5 cm of the target location and of the target orientation, the target changed colour to indicate they were within the target, which they then had to maintain for 0.5 s. If they were successful, a new target appeared. The participants were required to return to the initial position and then reach to the new target.

Bottom Line: Transhumeral amputation has a significant effect on a person's independence and quality of life.The offline training had a target of 4° for flexion/extension and 8° for pronation/supination, which it easily exceeded (2.7° and 5.5° respectively).During online testing, all subjects completed the target-reaching task with path efficiency of 78% and minimal overshoot (1.5%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, UK. Electronic address: d.blana@keele.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus