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A polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine applied by needle-free intradermal delivery induces cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses in pigs.

Borggren M, Nielsen J, Karlsson I, Dalgaard TS, Trebbien R, Williams JA, Fomsgaard A - Vaccine (2016)

Bottom Line: Both the antibody-mediated and the recall lymphocyte immune responses demonstrated high reactivity against vaccine-specific strains and cross-reactivity to vaccine-heterologous strains.The results suggest that polyvalent DNA influenza vaccination may provide a strong tool for broad protection against swine influenza strains threatening animal as well as public health.In addition, the needle-free administration technique used for this DNA vaccine will provide an easy and practical approach for the large-scale vaccination of swine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virus Research and Development Laboratory, Department of Microbiological Diagnostics and Virology, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. Electronic address: mabo@ssi.dk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Neutralizing activity in vaccinated pig sera. Pigs were vaccinated twice (day 0 and 21 pv1) i.d. with needle-free delivery with 200 μg (n = 6), 800 μg (n = 6) or 1972 μg (n = 5) DNA, or not DNA vaccinated at all (n = 5). The pig sera were tested in a microneutralization assay on days 21, 28 and 35 pv1. Neutralizing antibody titers, MN titers, were evaluated by the capacity of the sera to prevent the infection of MDCK cells by (a) H1N1pdm09, (b) 1999 H1N1 and (c) swine H1N1 isolates. The MN titer was defined as the reciprocal dilution giving 50% infection inhibition and calculated with a linear interpolation method [28]. Serum samples with a titer below the detectable limit of the assay (lowest serum dilution tested was 1:20) were assigned a value of 10 for graphical representation and statistical analyses. Error bars indicate the mean ± SEM, and significant differences from the no-vaccine control group are indicated by: ***: p < 0.001; **: p < 0.01; *: p < 0.05.
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fig0015: Neutralizing activity in vaccinated pig sera. Pigs were vaccinated twice (day 0 and 21 pv1) i.d. with needle-free delivery with 200 μg (n = 6), 800 μg (n = 6) or 1972 μg (n = 5) DNA, or not DNA vaccinated at all (n = 5). The pig sera were tested in a microneutralization assay on days 21, 28 and 35 pv1. Neutralizing antibody titers, MN titers, were evaluated by the capacity of the sera to prevent the infection of MDCK cells by (a) H1N1pdm09, (b) 1999 H1N1 and (c) swine H1N1 isolates. The MN titer was defined as the reciprocal dilution giving 50% infection inhibition and calculated with a linear interpolation method [28]. Serum samples with a titer below the detectable limit of the assay (lowest serum dilution tested was 1:20) were assigned a value of 10 for graphical representation and statistical analyses. Error bars indicate the mean ± SEM, and significant differences from the no-vaccine control group are indicated by: ***: p < 0.001; **: p < 0.01; *: p < 0.05.

Mentions: Neutralizing activity against H1N1 virus strains, both homologous and heterologous to the vaccine genes, developed in the vaccinated pigs (Fig. 3, only day 21 and beyond are shown). Neutralization could not be detected at time points earlier than day 28pv1, i.e. 1 week after the second vaccination. At this stage, the pigs receiving the highest dose of DNA had developed significantly higher MN titers against the homologous influenza virus H1N1pdm09 (Fig. 3a) and a heterologous human isolate (Fig. 3b) than the control group. At day 35pv1, the pigs given the middle dose of DNA, 800 μg, also had elevated MN titers against both human H1N1 isolates. Neutralization of a heterologous swine virus, H1N1pdm09, was also detected in the vaccinated pigs on day 35pv1 (Fig. 3c). Notably, only the lower- and middle-dose DNA groups demonstrated significant levels of neutralization compared to the control group. Significant correlations were observed for the MN titers derived from the three virus strains tested (Spearman correlations for all combinations between the three virus strains, r-range 0.45−0.64, p range 0.0001 to < 0.0001).


A polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine applied by needle-free intradermal delivery induces cross-reactive humoral and cellular immune responses in pigs.

Borggren M, Nielsen J, Karlsson I, Dalgaard TS, Trebbien R, Williams JA, Fomsgaard A - Vaccine (2016)

Neutralizing activity in vaccinated pig sera. Pigs were vaccinated twice (day 0 and 21 pv1) i.d. with needle-free delivery with 200 μg (n = 6), 800 μg (n = 6) or 1972 μg (n = 5) DNA, or not DNA vaccinated at all (n = 5). The pig sera were tested in a microneutralization assay on days 21, 28 and 35 pv1. Neutralizing antibody titers, MN titers, were evaluated by the capacity of the sera to prevent the infection of MDCK cells by (a) H1N1pdm09, (b) 1999 H1N1 and (c) swine H1N1 isolates. The MN titer was defined as the reciprocal dilution giving 50% infection inhibition and calculated with a linear interpolation method [28]. Serum samples with a titer below the detectable limit of the assay (lowest serum dilution tested was 1:20) were assigned a value of 10 for graphical representation and statistical analyses. Error bars indicate the mean ± SEM, and significant differences from the no-vaccine control group are indicated by: ***: p < 0.001; **: p < 0.01; *: p < 0.05.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY-NC-ND
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940207&req=5

fig0015: Neutralizing activity in vaccinated pig sera. Pigs were vaccinated twice (day 0 and 21 pv1) i.d. with needle-free delivery with 200 μg (n = 6), 800 μg (n = 6) or 1972 μg (n = 5) DNA, or not DNA vaccinated at all (n = 5). The pig sera were tested in a microneutralization assay on days 21, 28 and 35 pv1. Neutralizing antibody titers, MN titers, were evaluated by the capacity of the sera to prevent the infection of MDCK cells by (a) H1N1pdm09, (b) 1999 H1N1 and (c) swine H1N1 isolates. The MN titer was defined as the reciprocal dilution giving 50% infection inhibition and calculated with a linear interpolation method [28]. Serum samples with a titer below the detectable limit of the assay (lowest serum dilution tested was 1:20) were assigned a value of 10 for graphical representation and statistical analyses. Error bars indicate the mean ± SEM, and significant differences from the no-vaccine control group are indicated by: ***: p < 0.001; **: p < 0.01; *: p < 0.05.
Mentions: Neutralizing activity against H1N1 virus strains, both homologous and heterologous to the vaccine genes, developed in the vaccinated pigs (Fig. 3, only day 21 and beyond are shown). Neutralization could not be detected at time points earlier than day 28pv1, i.e. 1 week after the second vaccination. At this stage, the pigs receiving the highest dose of DNA had developed significantly higher MN titers against the homologous influenza virus H1N1pdm09 (Fig. 3a) and a heterologous human isolate (Fig. 3b) than the control group. At day 35pv1, the pigs given the middle dose of DNA, 800 μg, also had elevated MN titers against both human H1N1 isolates. Neutralization of a heterologous swine virus, H1N1pdm09, was also detected in the vaccinated pigs on day 35pv1 (Fig. 3c). Notably, only the lower- and middle-dose DNA groups demonstrated significant levels of neutralization compared to the control group. Significant correlations were observed for the MN titers derived from the three virus strains tested (Spearman correlations for all combinations between the three virus strains, r-range 0.45−0.64, p range 0.0001 to < 0.0001).

Bottom Line: Both the antibody-mediated and the recall lymphocyte immune responses demonstrated high reactivity against vaccine-specific strains and cross-reactivity to vaccine-heterologous strains.The results suggest that polyvalent DNA influenza vaccination may provide a strong tool for broad protection against swine influenza strains threatening animal as well as public health.In addition, the needle-free administration technique used for this DNA vaccine will provide an easy and practical approach for the large-scale vaccination of swine.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Virus Research and Development Laboratory, Department of Microbiological Diagnostics and Virology, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. Electronic address: mabo@ssi.dk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus