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Histopathological Characterization of Tail Injury and Traumatic Neuroma Development after Tail Docking in Piglets.

Sandercock DA, Smith SH, Di Giminiani P, Edwards SA - J. Comp. Pathol. (2016)

Bottom Line: Tissues were processed routinely for histopathological examination.Non-neural inflammatory and reparative epidermal and dermal changes associated with tissue thickening and healing were observed 1 to 4 months after docking.Mild neutrophilic inflammation was present in some cases, although this and other degenerative and non-neural reparative changes are not likely to have caused pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal and Veterinary Science Research Group, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), West Mains Road, Edinburgh, UK. Electronic address: dale.sandercock@sruc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Histopathological features in sections of pig tail stump 16 weeks after docking. (A) Fully healed tail tip with granulation tissue cap over the cut end of the coccygeal bone. HE. (B) Mature granulation tissue ‘cap’ regression with reduced dermal fibroplasia and angiogenesis. HE. (C) Dorsal and ventral neuromas with axonal sprouts in granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC. (D) Neuroma axonal sprouts dispersed in mature granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC.
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fig5: Histopathological features in sections of pig tail stump 16 weeks after docking. (A) Fully healed tail tip with granulation tissue cap over the cut end of the coccygeal bone. HE. (B) Mature granulation tissue ‘cap’ regression with reduced dermal fibroplasia and angiogenesis. HE. (C) Dorsal and ventral neuromas with axonal sprouts in granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC. (D) Neuroma axonal sprouts dispersed in mature granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC.

Mentions: All tails appeared fully healed and were free from minor cuts or abrasions on gross examination. Microscopically, all tails were fully re-epithelialized, with some signs of mild epidermal hyperplasia, orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis (Fig. 5A). Intra-epidermal or subcorneal pustules were not observed. Mild, superficial, perivascular lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and spongiosis were present in two of four tails. Mild dermal neutrophilic inflammation was evident in two of four tails, but dermal oedema was not present. In the dermis, a granulation tissue cap was still evident in all the tails (although more pronounced in some tails than in others). This was characterized by dermal fibroplasia and angiogenesis that was a little less pronounced compared with earlier time points (Fig. 5B). Similarly, myofibre atrophy was absent, with only limited evidence of myofibre regeneration. S100 immunolabelling revealed mild nerve sheath thickening and moderate axonal proliferation and sprouting in all tails, with widespread axonal infiltration of the superficial tail tip dermis in three of four tails (Fig. 5C). Neuromas of varying sizes and forms (i.e. diffuse and circumscribed) were present in the deep dermis and dispersed in the proximal part of the granulation tissue (Fig. 5D).


Histopathological Characterization of Tail Injury and Traumatic Neuroma Development after Tail Docking in Piglets.

Sandercock DA, Smith SH, Di Giminiani P, Edwards SA - J. Comp. Pathol. (2016)

Histopathological features in sections of pig tail stump 16 weeks after docking. (A) Fully healed tail tip with granulation tissue cap over the cut end of the coccygeal bone. HE. (B) Mature granulation tissue ‘cap’ regression with reduced dermal fibroplasia and angiogenesis. HE. (C) Dorsal and ventral neuromas with axonal sprouts in granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC. (D) Neuroma axonal sprouts dispersed in mature granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940206&req=5

fig5: Histopathological features in sections of pig tail stump 16 weeks after docking. (A) Fully healed tail tip with granulation tissue cap over the cut end of the coccygeal bone. HE. (B) Mature granulation tissue ‘cap’ regression with reduced dermal fibroplasia and angiogenesis. HE. (C) Dorsal and ventral neuromas with axonal sprouts in granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC. (D) Neuroma axonal sprouts dispersed in mature granulation tissue (S100 expression). IHC.
Mentions: All tails appeared fully healed and were free from minor cuts or abrasions on gross examination. Microscopically, all tails were fully re-epithelialized, with some signs of mild epidermal hyperplasia, orthokeratotic hyperkeratosis and parakeratosis (Fig. 5A). Intra-epidermal or subcorneal pustules were not observed. Mild, superficial, perivascular lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and spongiosis were present in two of four tails. Mild dermal neutrophilic inflammation was evident in two of four tails, but dermal oedema was not present. In the dermis, a granulation tissue cap was still evident in all the tails (although more pronounced in some tails than in others). This was characterized by dermal fibroplasia and angiogenesis that was a little less pronounced compared with earlier time points (Fig. 5B). Similarly, myofibre atrophy was absent, with only limited evidence of myofibre regeneration. S100 immunolabelling revealed mild nerve sheath thickening and moderate axonal proliferation and sprouting in all tails, with widespread axonal infiltration of the superficial tail tip dermis in three of four tails (Fig. 5C). Neuromas of varying sizes and forms (i.e. diffuse and circumscribed) were present in the deep dermis and dispersed in the proximal part of the granulation tissue (Fig. 5D).

Bottom Line: Tissues were processed routinely for histopathological examination.Non-neural inflammatory and reparative epidermal and dermal changes associated with tissue thickening and healing were observed 1 to 4 months after docking.Mild neutrophilic inflammation was present in some cases, although this and other degenerative and non-neural reparative changes are not likely to have caused pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal and Veterinary Science Research Group, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), West Mains Road, Edinburgh, UK. Electronic address: dale.sandercock@sruc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus