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Histopathological Characterization of Tail Injury and Traumatic Neuroma Development after Tail Docking in Piglets.

Sandercock DA, Smith SH, Di Giminiani P, Edwards SA - J. Comp. Pathol. (2016)

Bottom Line: Tissues were processed routinely for histopathological examination.Non-neural inflammatory and reparative epidermal and dermal changes associated with tissue thickening and healing were observed 1 to 4 months after docking.Mild neutrophilic inflammation was present in some cases, although this and other degenerative and non-neural reparative changes are not likely to have caused pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal and Veterinary Science Research Group, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), West Mains Road, Edinburgh, UK. Electronic address: dale.sandercock@sruc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Piglet tail (A) immediately before and (B) after approximately two-thirds removed by hot iron docking.
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fig1: Piglet tail (A) immediately before and (B) after approximately two-thirds removed by hot iron docking.

Mentions: Piglets were tail docked (approximately two-thirds of the tail removed) on post natal day 3 using a gas-heated docking iron (East Riding Farm Services, Driffield, UK) in line with commercial pig management procedures (Fig. 1). All tail tips healed without complications and did not incur any further injury throughout the duration of the study.


Histopathological Characterization of Tail Injury and Traumatic Neuroma Development after Tail Docking in Piglets.

Sandercock DA, Smith SH, Di Giminiani P, Edwards SA - J. Comp. Pathol. (2016)

Piglet tail (A) immediately before and (B) after approximately two-thirds removed by hot iron docking.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940206&req=5

fig1: Piglet tail (A) immediately before and (B) after approximately two-thirds removed by hot iron docking.
Mentions: Piglets were tail docked (approximately two-thirds of the tail removed) on post natal day 3 using a gas-heated docking iron (East Riding Farm Services, Driffield, UK) in line with commercial pig management procedures (Fig. 1). All tail tips healed without complications and did not incur any further injury throughout the duration of the study.

Bottom Line: Tissues were processed routinely for histopathological examination.Non-neural inflammatory and reparative epidermal and dermal changes associated with tissue thickening and healing were observed 1 to 4 months after docking.Mild neutrophilic inflammation was present in some cases, although this and other degenerative and non-neural reparative changes are not likely to have caused pain.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Animal and Veterinary Science Research Group, Scotland's Rural College (SRUC), West Mains Road, Edinburgh, UK. Electronic address: dale.sandercock@sruc.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus