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The COPD assessment test and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire: are they equivalent in subjects with COPD?

Morishita-Katsu M, Nishimura K, Taniguchi H, Kimura T, Kondoh Y, Kataoka K, Ogawa T, Watanabe F, Arizono S, Nishiyama O, Nakayasu K, Imaizumi K, Hasegawa Y - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2016)

Bottom Line: Statistically significant correlations were observed between CAT and SGRQ total scores (R=0.668, P<0.001).The CAT is similar to SGRQ in terms of discriminating health status.However, we demonstrated that what is assessed by the CAT may differ slightly from what is measured by SGRQ.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Japan; Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test (CAT) is a short questionnaire that has facilitated health status measurements in subjects with COPD. However, it remains controversial as to whether the CAT can be used as a suitable substitute for the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). This study investigated the reliability and score distributions of the CAT and SGRQ and evaluated which factors contributed to health status for each questionnaire.

Methods: A total of 109 consecutive subjects with stable COPD from a single center were enrolled in this study. Each subject completed pulmonary function tests, exercise tests, and the following self-administered questionnaires: the Baseline Dyspnea Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the CAT, and SGRQ.

Results: Internal consistencies of CAT and SGRQ total scores were both excellent (Cronbach's α coefficients =0.890 and 0.933). Statistically significant correlations were observed between CAT and SGRQ total scores (R=0.668, P<0.001). Correlations of CAT scores with parameters related to pulmonary function, dyspnea, exercise performance, and psychological factors were inferior to correlations with those parameters with SGRQ total scores. Both multiple regression analyses and principal component analyses revealed that there were slight differences between SGRQ total scores and CAT scores.

Conclusion: The CAT is similar to SGRQ in terms of discriminating health status. However, we demonstrated that what is assessed by the CAT may differ slightly from what is measured by SGRQ.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Scatter plot of the correlation between the CAT score and the SGRQ total score.Abbreviations: CAT, COPD assessment test; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; SGRQ, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire.
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f2-copd-11-1543: Scatter plot of the correlation between the CAT score and the SGRQ total score.Abbreviations: CAT, COPD assessment test; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; SGRQ, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire.

Mentions: The total score of the SGRQ was 27.3±17.3 in nine subjects with mild airflow limitation (GOLD 1), 32.8±18.8 in 33 subjects with moderate airflow limitation (GOLD 2), 48.0±15.4 in 46 subjects with severe airflow limitation (GOLD 3), and 57.9±16.0 in 21 subjects with very severe airflow limitation (GOLD 4). The SGRQ total score significantly differed by the degree of airflow limitation (GOLD 1 vs 3, P=0.005; GOLD 1 vs 4, P<0.001; GOLD 2 vs 3, P=0.001; GOLD 2 vs 4, P<0.001 and also P<0.001 by the Jonckheere–Terpstra trend test). Although there was a wide range of CAT scores for each degree of airflow limitation (10.3±8.0, 13.1±6.5, 16.9±8.4, and 21.7±8.5 for GOLD 1–4, respectively), scores were also significantly different for different degrees of airflow limitation (ie, GOLD 1 vs 4, P=0.003; GOLD 2 vs 4, P=0.001 and P<0.001 by the Jonckheere–Terpstra trend test). CAT scores significantly correlated with SGRQ total scores (R=0.668, P<0.001; Figure 2).


The COPD assessment test and St George's Respiratory Questionnaire: are they equivalent in subjects with COPD?

Morishita-Katsu M, Nishimura K, Taniguchi H, Kimura T, Kondoh Y, Kataoka K, Ogawa T, Watanabe F, Arizono S, Nishiyama O, Nakayasu K, Imaizumi K, Hasegawa Y - Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis (2016)

Scatter plot of the correlation between the CAT score and the SGRQ total score.Abbreviations: CAT, COPD assessment test; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; SGRQ, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940016&req=5

f2-copd-11-1543: Scatter plot of the correlation between the CAT score and the SGRQ total score.Abbreviations: CAT, COPD assessment test; COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; SGRQ, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire.
Mentions: The total score of the SGRQ was 27.3±17.3 in nine subjects with mild airflow limitation (GOLD 1), 32.8±18.8 in 33 subjects with moderate airflow limitation (GOLD 2), 48.0±15.4 in 46 subjects with severe airflow limitation (GOLD 3), and 57.9±16.0 in 21 subjects with very severe airflow limitation (GOLD 4). The SGRQ total score significantly differed by the degree of airflow limitation (GOLD 1 vs 3, P=0.005; GOLD 1 vs 4, P<0.001; GOLD 2 vs 3, P=0.001; GOLD 2 vs 4, P<0.001 and also P<0.001 by the Jonckheere–Terpstra trend test). Although there was a wide range of CAT scores for each degree of airflow limitation (10.3±8.0, 13.1±6.5, 16.9±8.4, and 21.7±8.5 for GOLD 1–4, respectively), scores were also significantly different for different degrees of airflow limitation (ie, GOLD 1 vs 4, P=0.003; GOLD 2 vs 4, P=0.001 and P<0.001 by the Jonckheere–Terpstra trend test). CAT scores significantly correlated with SGRQ total scores (R=0.668, P<0.001; Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Statistically significant correlations were observed between CAT and SGRQ total scores (R=0.668, P<0.001).The CAT is similar to SGRQ in terms of discriminating health status.However, we demonstrated that what is assessed by the CAT may differ slightly from what is measured by SGRQ.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergy, Tosei General Hospital, Seto, Japan; Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Medicine, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) assessment test (CAT) is a short questionnaire that has facilitated health status measurements in subjects with COPD. However, it remains controversial as to whether the CAT can be used as a suitable substitute for the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). This study investigated the reliability and score distributions of the CAT and SGRQ and evaluated which factors contributed to health status for each questionnaire.

Methods: A total of 109 consecutive subjects with stable COPD from a single center were enrolled in this study. Each subject completed pulmonary function tests, exercise tests, and the following self-administered questionnaires: the Baseline Dyspnea Index, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the CAT, and SGRQ.

Results: Internal consistencies of CAT and SGRQ total scores were both excellent (Cronbach's α coefficients =0.890 and 0.933). Statistically significant correlations were observed between CAT and SGRQ total scores (R=0.668, P<0.001). Correlations of CAT scores with parameters related to pulmonary function, dyspnea, exercise performance, and psychological factors were inferior to correlations with those parameters with SGRQ total scores. Both multiple regression analyses and principal component analyses revealed that there were slight differences between SGRQ total scores and CAT scores.

Conclusion: The CAT is similar to SGRQ in terms of discriminating health status. However, we demonstrated that what is assessed by the CAT may differ slightly from what is measured by SGRQ.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus