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Age-dependent vitreous separation from the macula in a clinic population.

Syed Z, Stewart MW - Clin Ophthalmol (2016)

Bottom Line: Demographic data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scan results were gathered.This prevalence rate steadily decreased to 5.6% in the 95- to 99-year age group.The length of vitreomacular adhesion averaged 4.6 mm in the 50- to 54-year age group and steadily decreased to 2.1 mm in the 90- to 95-year group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

ABSTRACT

Background: Vitreous degeneration begins soon after birth and accelerates throughout life. Vitreous liquefaction with a slowly progressive separation of the posterior hyaloid from the peripheral macula usually leads to complete posterior vitreous detachment. The purpose of this study is to measure the age-related prevalence of partial vitreous separation and the length of residual vitreous adhesion in an ophthalmology clinic population.

Methods: Patients examined by the senior author (MWS) during a 6-month period were included in a retrospective chart review. Demographic data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scan results were gathered. Data analysis with descriptive statistics focused on the prevalence and extent of partial vitreous separation.

Results: The mean age of the study patients was 69.9 years, and 62% were phakic. The highest prevalence of partial posterior hyaloid separation from the internal limiting membrane (71.2%) was seen in the 50- to 54-year age group. This prevalence rate steadily decreased to 5.6% in the 95- to 99-year age group. The prevalence of complete vitreous detachment as determined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy increased from 1.7% in the <50-year age group to a maximum of 29.2% in the 75- to 79-year group. The length of vitreomacular adhesion averaged 4.6 mm in the 50- to 54-year age group and steadily decreased to 2.1 mm in the 90- to 95-year group.

Conclusion: Vitreomacular separation affects the majority of eyes in the sixth decade of life. The prevalence of partial vitreous separation decreases with advancing age, probably because an increasing number of these patients progress to complete posterior vitreous detachment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Average length of partial vitreoretinal attachment by age.Note: The overall lengths of adhesion per 5-year intervals are plotted, and a regression-based trend-line has been added.
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f2-opth-10-1237: Average length of partial vitreoretinal attachment by age.Note: The overall lengths of adhesion per 5-year intervals are plotted, and a regression-based trend-line has been added.

Mentions: For all eyes with partial separation of the vitreous, the average length of vitreous attachment to the macula is listed by age groups in Figures 1 and 2. The length of vitreous attachment decreased from a high of 4.6 mm in the <50-year age group to 2.4 mm in the 95- to 99-age group. A trend-line (calculated by linear regression) is shown in Figure 2. This shows that the average length of VMA decreases by an average of 0.045 mm per year after the age of 50 years.


Age-dependent vitreous separation from the macula in a clinic population.

Syed Z, Stewart MW - Clin Ophthalmol (2016)

Average length of partial vitreoretinal attachment by age.Note: The overall lengths of adhesion per 5-year intervals are plotted, and a regression-based trend-line has been added.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940013&req=5

f2-opth-10-1237: Average length of partial vitreoretinal attachment by age.Note: The overall lengths of adhesion per 5-year intervals are plotted, and a regression-based trend-line has been added.
Mentions: For all eyes with partial separation of the vitreous, the average length of vitreous attachment to the macula is listed by age groups in Figures 1 and 2. The length of vitreous attachment decreased from a high of 4.6 mm in the <50-year age group to 2.4 mm in the 95- to 99-age group. A trend-line (calculated by linear regression) is shown in Figure 2. This shows that the average length of VMA decreases by an average of 0.045 mm per year after the age of 50 years.

Bottom Line: Demographic data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scan results were gathered.This prevalence rate steadily decreased to 5.6% in the 95- to 99-year age group.The length of vitreomacular adhesion averaged 4.6 mm in the 50- to 54-year age group and steadily decreased to 2.1 mm in the 90- to 95-year group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Georgetown University, Washington, DC.

ABSTRACT

Background: Vitreous degeneration begins soon after birth and accelerates throughout life. Vitreous liquefaction with a slowly progressive separation of the posterior hyaloid from the peripheral macula usually leads to complete posterior vitreous detachment. The purpose of this study is to measure the age-related prevalence of partial vitreous separation and the length of residual vitreous adhesion in an ophthalmology clinic population.

Methods: Patients examined by the senior author (MWS) during a 6-month period were included in a retrospective chart review. Demographic data and spectral domain optical coherence tomography scan results were gathered. Data analysis with descriptive statistics focused on the prevalence and extent of partial vitreous separation.

Results: The mean age of the study patients was 69.9 years, and 62% were phakic. The highest prevalence of partial posterior hyaloid separation from the internal limiting membrane (71.2%) was seen in the 50- to 54-year age group. This prevalence rate steadily decreased to 5.6% in the 95- to 99-year age group. The prevalence of complete vitreous detachment as determined by slit-lamp biomicroscopy increased from 1.7% in the <50-year age group to a maximum of 29.2% in the 75- to 79-year group. The length of vitreomacular adhesion averaged 4.6 mm in the 50- to 54-year age group and steadily decreased to 2.1 mm in the 90- to 95-year group.

Conclusion: Vitreomacular separation affects the majority of eyes in the sixth decade of life. The prevalence of partial vitreous separation decreases with advancing age, probably because an increasing number of these patients progress to complete posterior vitreous detachment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus