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Preoperative physical therapy treatment did not influence postoperative pain and disability outcomes in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy: a prospective study.

Valencia C, Coronado RA, Simon CB, Wright TW, Moser MW, Farmer KW, George SZ - J Pain Res (2016)

Bottom Line: In contrast, age, pain intensity, disability, and pain-associated psychological factors did not differ between pre-op PT treatment groups (P>0.05).Receiving pre-op PT treatment did not influence post-op PT treatment or pain and disability outcomes at 3 months and 6 months.However, these differences did not influence postoperative outcomes in this cohort.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited literature investigating preoperative physical therapy (pre-op PT) treatment on pain intensity and disability after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of the present cohort study were to describe patient characteristics for those who had and did not have pre-op PT treatment and determine whether pre-op PT influenced the length of postoperative physical therapy (post-op PT) treatment (number of sessions) and 3-month and 6-month postsurgical outcomes, such as pain intensity and disability.

Patients and methods: A total of 124 patients (mean age =43 years, 81 males) with shoulder pain were observed before and after shoulder arthroscopic surgery. Demographic data, medical history, and validated self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Analysis of variance models were performed to identify differences across measures for patients who had pre-op PT treatment and those who did not and to examine outcome differences at 3 months and 6 months. Alpha was set at the 0.05 level for statistical significance.

Results: Males had less participation in pre-op PT than females (P=0.01). In contrast, age, pain intensity, disability, and pain-associated psychological factors did not differ between pre-op PT treatment groups (P>0.05). Subacromial bursectomies were more commonly performed in patients having pre-op PT treatment (P<0.05). Pre-op PT treatment did not influence length of post-op PT treatment and did not affect 3-month and 6-month pain intensity and disability outcomes. Differences in distribution of pre-op PT for males and females and subacromial bursectomy did not influence 3-month or 6-month postsurgical outcomes.

Conclusion: Receiving pre-op PT treatment did not influence post-op PT treatment or pain and disability outcomes at 3 months and 6 months. This prospective cohort study provides no evidence of benefit for pre-op PT on post-op PT treatment or postsurgical outcomes. Females or patients receiving certain surgical procedures are more likely to undergo pre-op PT treatment. However, these differences did not influence postoperative outcomes in this cohort.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Clinical pain over time between patients having pre-op PT treatment and patients not having pre-op PT treatment.Abbreviations: pre-op PT, preoperative physical therapy; NRS, numerical rating scale.
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f1-jpr-9-493: Clinical pain over time between patients having pre-op PT treatment and patients not having pre-op PT treatment.Abbreviations: pre-op PT, preoperative physical therapy; NRS, numerical rating scale.

Mentions: Repeated measures of ANOVA examined changes in clinical pain intensity and disability between patients having and not having pre-op PT treatment. Results showed no time × group interaction for clinical pain intensity (F[2,180]=0.33; P=0.72); as expected, there was a significant main effect of clinical pain over time (F[2,180]=64.41; P<0.001), where pain significantly decreased from baseline (mean =3.33; SD =2.33) to 3 months (mean =1.52; SD =1.61) and from 3 months to 6 months (mean =1.17; SD =1.45) (Figure 1).


Preoperative physical therapy treatment did not influence postoperative pain and disability outcomes in patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy: a prospective study.

Valencia C, Coronado RA, Simon CB, Wright TW, Moser MW, Farmer KW, George SZ - J Pain Res (2016)

Clinical pain over time between patients having pre-op PT treatment and patients not having pre-op PT treatment.Abbreviations: pre-op PT, preoperative physical therapy; NRS, numerical rating scale.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4940007&req=5

f1-jpr-9-493: Clinical pain over time between patients having pre-op PT treatment and patients not having pre-op PT treatment.Abbreviations: pre-op PT, preoperative physical therapy; NRS, numerical rating scale.
Mentions: Repeated measures of ANOVA examined changes in clinical pain intensity and disability between patients having and not having pre-op PT treatment. Results showed no time × group interaction for clinical pain intensity (F[2,180]=0.33; P=0.72); as expected, there was a significant main effect of clinical pain over time (F[2,180]=64.41; P<0.001), where pain significantly decreased from baseline (mean =3.33; SD =2.33) to 3 months (mean =1.52; SD =1.61) and from 3 months to 6 months (mean =1.17; SD =1.45) (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: In contrast, age, pain intensity, disability, and pain-associated psychological factors did not differ between pre-op PT treatment groups (P>0.05).Receiving pre-op PT treatment did not influence post-op PT treatment or pain and disability outcomes at 3 months and 6 months.However, these differences did not influence postoperative outcomes in this cohort.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Applied Medicine and Rehabilitation, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is limited literature investigating preoperative physical therapy (pre-op PT) treatment on pain intensity and disability after musculoskeletal surgery. The purposes of the present cohort study were to describe patient characteristics for those who had and did not have pre-op PT treatment and determine whether pre-op PT influenced the length of postoperative physical therapy (post-op PT) treatment (number of sessions) and 3-month and 6-month postsurgical outcomes, such as pain intensity and disability.

Patients and methods: A total of 124 patients (mean age =43 years, 81 males) with shoulder pain were observed before and after shoulder arthroscopic surgery. Demographic data, medical history, and validated self-report questionnaires were collected preoperatively and at 3 months and 6 months after surgery. Analysis of variance models were performed to identify differences across measures for patients who had pre-op PT treatment and those who did not and to examine outcome differences at 3 months and 6 months. Alpha was set at the 0.05 level for statistical significance.

Results: Males had less participation in pre-op PT than females (P=0.01). In contrast, age, pain intensity, disability, and pain-associated psychological factors did not differ between pre-op PT treatment groups (P>0.05). Subacromial bursectomies were more commonly performed in patients having pre-op PT treatment (P<0.05). Pre-op PT treatment did not influence length of post-op PT treatment and did not affect 3-month and 6-month pain intensity and disability outcomes. Differences in distribution of pre-op PT for males and females and subacromial bursectomy did not influence 3-month or 6-month postsurgical outcomes.

Conclusion: Receiving pre-op PT treatment did not influence post-op PT treatment or pain and disability outcomes at 3 months and 6 months. This prospective cohort study provides no evidence of benefit for pre-op PT on post-op PT treatment or postsurgical outcomes. Females or patients receiving certain surgical procedures are more likely to undergo pre-op PT treatment. However, these differences did not influence postoperative outcomes in this cohort.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus