Limits...
Maintenance of somatic tissue regeneration with age in short- and long-lived species of sea urchins.

Bodnar AG, Coffman JA - Aging Cell (2016)

Bottom Line: Sea urchins grow indeterminately, regenerate damaged appendages and reproduce throughout their lifespan and yet different species are reported to have very different life expectancies (ranging from 4 to more than 100 years).The ability to regenerate damaged tissue was maintained with age as assessed by the regrowth of amputated spines and tube feet (motor and sensory appendages).The results indicate that regenerative potential was maintained with age regardless of lifespan, contrary to the expectation that shorter lived species would invest less in maintenance and repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, 17 Biological Station, St. George's, GE01, Bermuda.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry of sea urchin tissues and cells using an antibody to Vasa. Esophagus, radial nerve, coelomocytes, tube foot, and spine from Lytechinus variegatus stained with DAPI or reacted with anti‐Vasa antibody visualized with DyLight™ 488 secondary antibody. Negative control panels are tissue sections treated with only the secondary antibody. Scale bar is 100 μm.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4933669&req=5

acel12487-fig-0006: Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry of sea urchin tissues and cells using an antibody to Vasa. Esophagus, radial nerve, coelomocytes, tube foot, and spine from Lytechinus variegatus stained with DAPI or reacted with anti‐Vasa antibody visualized with DyLight™ 488 secondary antibody. Negative control panels are tissue sections treated with only the secondary antibody. Scale bar is 100 μm.

Mentions: Immunohistochemistry was used to localize the Vasa protein in different tissues. For these experiments, four samples of each tissue (muscle, esophagus, and radial nerve) for each species were analyzed (Table 1). Representative data for L. variegatus are shown in Fig. 6 and those for S. purpuratus and M. franciscanus are shown in Fig. S4. Esophagus tissue from all three species consistently showed areas of Vasa staining at the base or within the villi (Figs. 6 and S4). Radial nerve also showed areas of Vasa staining; however the specific vasa‐positive cell types could not be identified (Figs. 6 and S4). Muscle had only a low level of diffuse staining without localized areas of high signal (data shown only for M. franciscanus, Fig. S4). To quantify the level of Vasa staining in esophagus and radial nerve, the percent of Vasa‐positive cells was estimated from the number of nuclei surrounded by Vasa staining when images from both fluorescent channels were overlaid. This ranged from 0.9% to 4.3% for radial nerve, with lower levels of immunoreactivity in M. franciscanus tissue compared to the other two species. Vasa‐positive cells ranged from 2.5% to 5.1% for esophagus with no significant difference between species.


Maintenance of somatic tissue regeneration with age in short- and long-lived species of sea urchins.

Bodnar AG, Coffman JA - Aging Cell (2016)

Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry of sea urchin tissues and cells using an antibody to Vasa. Esophagus, radial nerve, coelomocytes, tube foot, and spine from Lytechinus variegatus stained with DAPI or reacted with anti‐Vasa antibody visualized with DyLight™ 488 secondary antibody. Negative control panels are tissue sections treated with only the secondary antibody. Scale bar is 100 μm.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4933669&req=5

acel12487-fig-0006: Immunohistochemistry and immunocytochemistry of sea urchin tissues and cells using an antibody to Vasa. Esophagus, radial nerve, coelomocytes, tube foot, and spine from Lytechinus variegatus stained with DAPI or reacted with anti‐Vasa antibody visualized with DyLight™ 488 secondary antibody. Negative control panels are tissue sections treated with only the secondary antibody. Scale bar is 100 μm.
Mentions: Immunohistochemistry was used to localize the Vasa protein in different tissues. For these experiments, four samples of each tissue (muscle, esophagus, and radial nerve) for each species were analyzed (Table 1). Representative data for L. variegatus are shown in Fig. 6 and those for S. purpuratus and M. franciscanus are shown in Fig. S4. Esophagus tissue from all three species consistently showed areas of Vasa staining at the base or within the villi (Figs. 6 and S4). Radial nerve also showed areas of Vasa staining; however the specific vasa‐positive cell types could not be identified (Figs. 6 and S4). Muscle had only a low level of diffuse staining without localized areas of high signal (data shown only for M. franciscanus, Fig. S4). To quantify the level of Vasa staining in esophagus and radial nerve, the percent of Vasa‐positive cells was estimated from the number of nuclei surrounded by Vasa staining when images from both fluorescent channels were overlaid. This ranged from 0.9% to 4.3% for radial nerve, with lower levels of immunoreactivity in M. franciscanus tissue compared to the other two species. Vasa‐positive cells ranged from 2.5% to 5.1% for esophagus with no significant difference between species.

Bottom Line: Sea urchins grow indeterminately, regenerate damaged appendages and reproduce throughout their lifespan and yet different species are reported to have very different life expectancies (ranging from 4 to more than 100 years).The ability to regenerate damaged tissue was maintained with age as assessed by the regrowth of amputated spines and tube feet (motor and sensory appendages).The results indicate that regenerative potential was maintained with age regardless of lifespan, contrary to the expectation that shorter lived species would invest less in maintenance and repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, 17 Biological Station, St. George's, GE01, Bermuda.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus