Limits...
Maintenance of somatic tissue regeneration with age in short- and long-lived species of sea urchins.

Bodnar AG, Coffman JA - Aging Cell (2016)

Bottom Line: Sea urchins grow indeterminately, regenerate damaged appendages and reproduce throughout their lifespan and yet different species are reported to have very different life expectancies (ranging from 4 to more than 100 years).The ability to regenerate damaged tissue was maintained with age as assessed by the regrowth of amputated spines and tube feet (motor and sensory appendages).The results indicate that regenerative potential was maintained with age regardless of lifespan, contrary to the expectation that shorter lived species would invest less in maintenance and repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, 17 Biological Station, St. George's, GE01, Bermuda.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sea urchin anatomy and tissue regeneration. (A) Cross sectional view of Lytechinus variegatus showing tissues used in this study: spine, gonad, muscle from Aristotle's lantern jaw structure, esophagus, radial nerve along the inside wall of the test (shell) surrounded by the ampulla, part of the water vascular system which is continuous with the tube feet that protrude through the test. Coelomocytes freely circulate in the coelomic fluid that fills the body cavity. B through D show the spine and tube feet regeneration assay using Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. (B) Aboral view 1 day postamputation showing tube feet and spines removed from along one of the ambulacral segments of the test from the oral to aboral surface. (C) Lateral view of the amputated region, 8 days postamputation. (D) Lateral view of the amputated region from the same animal, 36 days postamputation.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4933669&req=5

acel12487-fig-0001: Sea urchin anatomy and tissue regeneration. (A) Cross sectional view of Lytechinus variegatus showing tissues used in this study: spine, gonad, muscle from Aristotle's lantern jaw structure, esophagus, radial nerve along the inside wall of the test (shell) surrounded by the ampulla, part of the water vascular system which is continuous with the tube feet that protrude through the test. Coelomocytes freely circulate in the coelomic fluid that fills the body cavity. B through D show the spine and tube feet regeneration assay using Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. (B) Aboral view 1 day postamputation showing tube feet and spines removed from along one of the ambulacral segments of the test from the oral to aboral surface. (C) Lateral view of the amputated region, 8 days postamputation. (D) Lateral view of the amputated region from the same animal, 36 days postamputation.

Mentions: Cell proliferation was quantified by BrdU incorporation in tissues of three species of sea urchin with different lifespans. The tissues used for this analysis were Aristotle's lantern muscle, radial nerve, esophagus, and coelomocytes (Fig. 1A). The sizes and estimated ages of the sea urchins used for these experiments are shown in Table 1. In these collections, L. variegatus and S. purpuratus had a good size separation range between the different age groups, while the largest M. franciscanus were not particularly old due to difficulties finding large animals at the site of collection. Overall levels of BrdU incorporation during a 24‐h treatment period were low ranging from 0.14% to 2.65%, with the highest levels of cell proliferation in the coelomocytes and radial nerve (Fig. 2). One‐way ANOVA or Kruskal−Wallis tests and post hoc analyses revealed few interspecies differences in cell proliferation when compared within age categories. There was a trend for decreasing BrdU incorporation with age/size with results reaching statistical significance in muscle, nerve, and coelomocytes for L. variegatus, esophagus and nerve of S. purpuratus, and nerve of M. franciscanus (P < 0.05 for all) (Fig. 2). The total number of cells analyzed, as well as representative images are shown in Fig. S1 (Supporting information).


Maintenance of somatic tissue regeneration with age in short- and long-lived species of sea urchins.

Bodnar AG, Coffman JA - Aging Cell (2016)

Sea urchin anatomy and tissue regeneration. (A) Cross sectional view of Lytechinus variegatus showing tissues used in this study: spine, gonad, muscle from Aristotle's lantern jaw structure, esophagus, radial nerve along the inside wall of the test (shell) surrounded by the ampulla, part of the water vascular system which is continuous with the tube feet that protrude through the test. Coelomocytes freely circulate in the coelomic fluid that fills the body cavity. B through D show the spine and tube feet regeneration assay using Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. (B) Aboral view 1 day postamputation showing tube feet and spines removed from along one of the ambulacral segments of the test from the oral to aboral surface. (C) Lateral view of the amputated region, 8 days postamputation. (D) Lateral view of the amputated region from the same animal, 36 days postamputation.
© Copyright Policy - creativeCommonsBy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4933669&req=5

acel12487-fig-0001: Sea urchin anatomy and tissue regeneration. (A) Cross sectional view of Lytechinus variegatus showing tissues used in this study: spine, gonad, muscle from Aristotle's lantern jaw structure, esophagus, radial nerve along the inside wall of the test (shell) surrounded by the ampulla, part of the water vascular system which is continuous with the tube feet that protrude through the test. Coelomocytes freely circulate in the coelomic fluid that fills the body cavity. B through D show the spine and tube feet regeneration assay using Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. (B) Aboral view 1 day postamputation showing tube feet and spines removed from along one of the ambulacral segments of the test from the oral to aboral surface. (C) Lateral view of the amputated region, 8 days postamputation. (D) Lateral view of the amputated region from the same animal, 36 days postamputation.
Mentions: Cell proliferation was quantified by BrdU incorporation in tissues of three species of sea urchin with different lifespans. The tissues used for this analysis were Aristotle's lantern muscle, radial nerve, esophagus, and coelomocytes (Fig. 1A). The sizes and estimated ages of the sea urchins used for these experiments are shown in Table 1. In these collections, L. variegatus and S. purpuratus had a good size separation range between the different age groups, while the largest M. franciscanus were not particularly old due to difficulties finding large animals at the site of collection. Overall levels of BrdU incorporation during a 24‐h treatment period were low ranging from 0.14% to 2.65%, with the highest levels of cell proliferation in the coelomocytes and radial nerve (Fig. 2). One‐way ANOVA or Kruskal−Wallis tests and post hoc analyses revealed few interspecies differences in cell proliferation when compared within age categories. There was a trend for decreasing BrdU incorporation with age/size with results reaching statistical significance in muscle, nerve, and coelomocytes for L. variegatus, esophagus and nerve of S. purpuratus, and nerve of M. franciscanus (P < 0.05 for all) (Fig. 2). The total number of cells analyzed, as well as representative images are shown in Fig. S1 (Supporting information).

Bottom Line: Sea urchins grow indeterminately, regenerate damaged appendages and reproduce throughout their lifespan and yet different species are reported to have very different life expectancies (ranging from 4 to more than 100 years).The ability to regenerate damaged tissue was maintained with age as assessed by the regrowth of amputated spines and tube feet (motor and sensory appendages).The results indicate that regenerative potential was maintained with age regardless of lifespan, contrary to the expectation that shorter lived species would invest less in maintenance and repair.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences, 17 Biological Station, St. George's, GE01, Bermuda.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus