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Photovoice as a Method for Revealing Community Perceptions of the Built and Social Environment.

Nykiforuk CI, Vallianatos H, Nieuwendyk LM - Int J Qual Methods (2011)

Bottom Line: Over the last number of years there has been growing interest in the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) for preventing and controlling complex public health problems.One emerging opportunity for the utilization of photovoice methodology is research on community built and social environments, particularly when looking at the context of the neighbourhood.The paper concludes with methodological recommendations and directions for future research.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Over the last number of years there has been growing interest in the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) for preventing and controlling complex public health problems. Photovoice is one of several qualitative methods utilized in CBPR, as it is a participatory method that has community participants use photography, and stories about their photographs, to identify and represent issues of importance to them. Over the past several years photovoice methodology has been frequently used to explore community health and social issues. One emerging opportunity for the utilization of photovoice methodology is research on community built and social environments, particularly when looking at the context of the neighbourhood. What is missing from the current body of photovoice literature is a critique of the strengths and weaknesses of photovoice as a method for health promotion research (which traditionally emphasizes capacity-building, community-based approaches) and as a method for revealing residents' perceptions of community as a source of health opportunities or barriers. This paper will begin to address this gap by discussing the successes and challenges of using the photovoice methodology in a recent CBPR project to explore community perceptions of the built and social environment (with the ultimate goal of informing community-based chronic disease prevention initiatives). The paper concludes with methodological recommendations and directions for future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of a ‘Physical Activity’ Photo Story
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Figure 1: Example of a ‘Physical Activity’ Photo Story

Mentions: Following the interview, the top five photographs from those discussed by each participant were presented in a community presentation or display. The top five from each participant were selected as this allowed for the majority of each of the participants’ most meaningful photographs to be shared. A brief summary was written based on the interview transcripts to accompany each photograph. All of the photos and associated summaries were sent to the participant to review prior to being displayed in the community. This review process offered participants the opportunity to identify if they did not want a particular photograph displayed and to ensure that the written summary accurately reflected what they had intended it to reflect. All participants were successfully contacted and only a few participants (approximately five) had feedback about their summaries, particularly to do with wording choices; in each case, the participant’s revised wording was used. Participants were given the option of having their names associated with the photos or kept confidential (i.e., known only to a few members of the research team). Examples of participants’ photo stories are provided in Figures 1 and 2; analysis of photo stories beyond the preparation of summaries is detailed below figures.


Photovoice as a Method for Revealing Community Perceptions of the Built and Social Environment.

Nykiforuk CI, Vallianatos H, Nieuwendyk LM - Int J Qual Methods (2011)

Example of a ‘Physical Activity’ Photo Story
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4933584&req=5

Figure 1: Example of a ‘Physical Activity’ Photo Story
Mentions: Following the interview, the top five photographs from those discussed by each participant were presented in a community presentation or display. The top five from each participant were selected as this allowed for the majority of each of the participants’ most meaningful photographs to be shared. A brief summary was written based on the interview transcripts to accompany each photograph. All of the photos and associated summaries were sent to the participant to review prior to being displayed in the community. This review process offered participants the opportunity to identify if they did not want a particular photograph displayed and to ensure that the written summary accurately reflected what they had intended it to reflect. All participants were successfully contacted and only a few participants (approximately five) had feedback about their summaries, particularly to do with wording choices; in each case, the participant’s revised wording was used. Participants were given the option of having their names associated with the photos or kept confidential (i.e., known only to a few members of the research team). Examples of participants’ photo stories are provided in Figures 1 and 2; analysis of photo stories beyond the preparation of summaries is detailed below figures.

Bottom Line: Over the last number of years there has been growing interest in the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) for preventing and controlling complex public health problems.One emerging opportunity for the utilization of photovoice methodology is research on community built and social environments, particularly when looking at the context of the neighbourhood.The paper concludes with methodological recommendations and directions for future research.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Health Promotion Studies, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Over the last number of years there has been growing interest in the use of community-based participatory research (CBPR) for preventing and controlling complex public health problems. Photovoice is one of several qualitative methods utilized in CBPR, as it is a participatory method that has community participants use photography, and stories about their photographs, to identify and represent issues of importance to them. Over the past several years photovoice methodology has been frequently used to explore community health and social issues. One emerging opportunity for the utilization of photovoice methodology is research on community built and social environments, particularly when looking at the context of the neighbourhood. What is missing from the current body of photovoice literature is a critique of the strengths and weaknesses of photovoice as a method for health promotion research (which traditionally emphasizes capacity-building, community-based approaches) and as a method for revealing residents' perceptions of community as a source of health opportunities or barriers. This paper will begin to address this gap by discussing the successes and challenges of using the photovoice methodology in a recent CBPR project to explore community perceptions of the built and social environment (with the ultimate goal of informing community-based chronic disease prevention initiatives). The paper concludes with methodological recommendations and directions for future research.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus