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Association between pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score and gastric cancer survival and clinicopathological features: a meta-analysis.

Zhang CX, Wang SY, Chen SQ, Yang SL, Wan L, Xiong B - Onco Targets Ther (2016)

Bottom Line: The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS) predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37-1.66, P<0.01) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26-1.68, P<0.01) in GC patients.Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11-4.53, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23-6.56, P<0.01), lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00-4.62, P<0.01), and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81-6.99, P<0.01).Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) is widely known as a systemic inflammatory-based marker. The relationship between pretreatment GPS and gastric cancer (GC) survival and clinicopathological features remains controversial. The aim of the study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the association between pretreatment GPS and survival and clinicopathological features in GC patients.

Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and BioMed databases for relevant studies. Combined analyses were used to assess the association between pretreatment GPS and overall survival, disease-free survival, and clinicopathological parameters by Stata Version 12.0.

Results: A total of 14 studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 5,579 GC patients. The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS) predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37-1.66, P<0.01) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26-1.68, P<0.01) in GC patients. Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11-4.53, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23-6.56, P<0.01), lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00-4.62, P<0.01), and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81-6.99, P<0.01).

Conclusion: Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Funnel plot of included studies reporting OS in GC patients.Notes: (A) Begg’s funnel plot for the assessment of potential publication bias; (B) funnel plot adjusted with trim and fill method. Circles: included studies. Squares: presumed missing studies.Abbreviations: OS, overall survival; GC, gastric cancer; HR, hazard ratio; SE, standard error.
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f5-ott-9-3883: Funnel plot of included studies reporting OS in GC patients.Notes: (A) Begg’s funnel plot for the assessment of potential publication bias; (B) funnel plot adjusted with trim and fill method. Circles: included studies. Squares: presumed missing studies.Abbreviations: OS, overall survival; GC, gastric cancer; HR, hazard ratio; SE, standard error.

Mentions: We evaluated publication bias using Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s linear regression test. Publication bias was found only in OS (P=0.04 for Begg’s test and P=0.02 for Egger’s test; Figure 5A). Therefore, the “trim and fill” analysis was further performed. As a result, there were four studies hypothetically remained unpublished, and recalculated result did not change significantly (HR =1.46, 95% CI: 1.33–1.60, P<0.01), indicating the stability of the result (Figure 5B).


Association between pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score and gastric cancer survival and clinicopathological features: a meta-analysis.

Zhang CX, Wang SY, Chen SQ, Yang SL, Wan L, Xiong B - Onco Targets Ther (2016)

Funnel plot of included studies reporting OS in GC patients.Notes: (A) Begg’s funnel plot for the assessment of potential publication bias; (B) funnel plot adjusted with trim and fill method. Circles: included studies. Squares: presumed missing studies.Abbreviations: OS, overall survival; GC, gastric cancer; HR, hazard ratio; SE, standard error.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4930270&req=5

f5-ott-9-3883: Funnel plot of included studies reporting OS in GC patients.Notes: (A) Begg’s funnel plot for the assessment of potential publication bias; (B) funnel plot adjusted with trim and fill method. Circles: included studies. Squares: presumed missing studies.Abbreviations: OS, overall survival; GC, gastric cancer; HR, hazard ratio; SE, standard error.
Mentions: We evaluated publication bias using Begg’s funnel plot and Egger’s linear regression test. Publication bias was found only in OS (P=0.04 for Begg’s test and P=0.02 for Egger’s test; Figure 5A). Therefore, the “trim and fill” analysis was further performed. As a result, there were four studies hypothetically remained unpublished, and recalculated result did not change significantly (HR =1.46, 95% CI: 1.33–1.60, P<0.01), indicating the stability of the result (Figure 5B).

Bottom Line: The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS) predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37-1.66, P<0.01) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26-1.68, P<0.01) in GC patients.Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11-4.53, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23-6.56, P<0.01), lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00-4.62, P<0.01), and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81-6.99, P<0.01).Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan, Hubei, People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) is widely known as a systemic inflammatory-based marker. The relationship between pretreatment GPS and gastric cancer (GC) survival and clinicopathological features remains controversial. The aim of the study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the association between pretreatment GPS and survival and clinicopathological features in GC patients.

Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and BioMed databases for relevant studies. Combined analyses were used to assess the association between pretreatment GPS and overall survival, disease-free survival, and clinicopathological parameters by Stata Version 12.0.

Results: A total of 14 studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 5,579 GC patients. The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS) predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37-1.66, P<0.01) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26-1.68, P<0.01) in GC patients. Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor-node-metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11-4.53, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23-6.56, P<0.01), lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00-4.62, P<0.01), and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81-6.99, P<0.01).

Conclusion: Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus