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Secret Forwarding of Events over Distributed Publish/Subscribe Overlay Network.

Yoon Y, Kim BH - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: This is to reliably and confidentially deliver decryption keys along with encrypted publications even under the presence of several Byzantine brokers across publish/subscribe overlay networks.We also propose a framework for dynamically and strategically allocating broker replicas based on flexibly definable criteria for reliability and performance.Moreover, a thorough evaluation is done through a case study on social networks using the real trace of interactions among Facebook users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Engineering, Hongik University, Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Publish/subscribe is a communication paradigm where loosely-coupled clients communicate in an asynchronous fashion. Publish/subscribe supports the flexible development of large-scale, event-driven and ubiquitous systems. Publish/subscribe is prevalent in a number of application domains such as social networking, distributed business processes and real-time mission-critical systems. Many publish/subscribe applications are sensitive to message loss and violation of privacy. To overcome such issues, we propose a novel method of using secret sharing and replication techniques. This is to reliably and confidentially deliver decryption keys along with encrypted publications even under the presence of several Byzantine brokers across publish/subscribe overlay networks. We also propose a framework for dynamically and strategically allocating broker replicas based on flexibly definable criteria for reliability and performance. Moreover, a thorough evaluation is done through a case study on social networks using the real trace of interactions among Facebook users.

No MeSH data available.


An example of routing state updates on pub/sub overlay.
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pone.0158516.g001: An example of routing state updates on pub/sub overlay.

Mentions: Pub/sub systems are typically formed into an overlay of distributed event matching and forwarding brokers [8–11, 18, 19] in order to process a large volume of events in a scalable manner. In reference implementations of pub/sub broker overlay [20, 21], a publisher first disseminates an advertisement to all the brokers before publishing events. We call a published event as a publication. Publication can be labeled with a specific topic and can contain messages or content. If a subscription matches an advertisement in the SRT (Subscription Routing Table), which is essentially a list of [advertisement,last hop] tuples, the subscription is forwarded to the last hop broker where the advertisement came from. In this way, subscriptions are routed towards the publisher. Subscriptions are used to construct the PRT (Publication Routing Table). The PRT is a list of [subscription,last hop] tuples, which is used to route publications. If a publication matches a subscription in the PRT, it is forwarded to the last hop broker where the subscription came from. This process continues until the publication finally reaches the subscriber. Fig 1 shows an example of content-based routing. In Step 1, an advertisement (M1) arrives at B1. In Step 2, a matching subscription (M2) arrives at B3. Since M2 matches M1 at broker B3, M2 is relayed to B1 which is the last hop of M1. After the completion of these steps, PRTs are updated accordingly along the path () from B1 to B3. Based on the routing information on the PRTs on , a publication (e.g., M3) that matches the subscription M2 can be delivered to the subscriber S1 through . Subscribers can specify an interest on a particular topic such as (class,=,bar) in M2. Subscribers can also express the interest in a more fine-grained way by being specific on the content. For example, S1 expressed the interest over particular value range for the attribute price, as shown in Fig 1.


Secret Forwarding of Events over Distributed Publish/Subscribe Overlay Network.

Yoon Y, Kim BH - PLoS ONE (2016)

An example of routing state updates on pub/sub overlay.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4930217&req=5

pone.0158516.g001: An example of routing state updates on pub/sub overlay.
Mentions: Pub/sub systems are typically formed into an overlay of distributed event matching and forwarding brokers [8–11, 18, 19] in order to process a large volume of events in a scalable manner. In reference implementations of pub/sub broker overlay [20, 21], a publisher first disseminates an advertisement to all the brokers before publishing events. We call a published event as a publication. Publication can be labeled with a specific topic and can contain messages or content. If a subscription matches an advertisement in the SRT (Subscription Routing Table), which is essentially a list of [advertisement,last hop] tuples, the subscription is forwarded to the last hop broker where the advertisement came from. In this way, subscriptions are routed towards the publisher. Subscriptions are used to construct the PRT (Publication Routing Table). The PRT is a list of [subscription,last hop] tuples, which is used to route publications. If a publication matches a subscription in the PRT, it is forwarded to the last hop broker where the subscription came from. This process continues until the publication finally reaches the subscriber. Fig 1 shows an example of content-based routing. In Step 1, an advertisement (M1) arrives at B1. In Step 2, a matching subscription (M2) arrives at B3. Since M2 matches M1 at broker B3, M2 is relayed to B1 which is the last hop of M1. After the completion of these steps, PRTs are updated accordingly along the path () from B1 to B3. Based on the routing information on the PRTs on , a publication (e.g., M3) that matches the subscription M2 can be delivered to the subscriber S1 through . Subscribers can specify an interest on a particular topic such as (class,=,bar) in M2. Subscribers can also express the interest in a more fine-grained way by being specific on the content. For example, S1 expressed the interest over particular value range for the attribute price, as shown in Fig 1.

Bottom Line: This is to reliably and confidentially deliver decryption keys along with encrypted publications even under the presence of several Byzantine brokers across publish/subscribe overlay networks.We also propose a framework for dynamically and strategically allocating broker replicas based on flexibly definable criteria for reliability and performance.Moreover, a thorough evaluation is done through a case study on social networks using the real trace of interactions among Facebook users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Computer Engineering, Hongik University, Seoul, South Korea.

ABSTRACT
Publish/subscribe is a communication paradigm where loosely-coupled clients communicate in an asynchronous fashion. Publish/subscribe supports the flexible development of large-scale, event-driven and ubiquitous systems. Publish/subscribe is prevalent in a number of application domains such as social networking, distributed business processes and real-time mission-critical systems. Many publish/subscribe applications are sensitive to message loss and violation of privacy. To overcome such issues, we propose a novel method of using secret sharing and replication techniques. This is to reliably and confidentially deliver decryption keys along with encrypted publications even under the presence of several Byzantine brokers across publish/subscribe overlay networks. We also propose a framework for dynamically and strategically allocating broker replicas based on flexibly definable criteria for reliability and performance. Moreover, a thorough evaluation is done through a case study on social networks using the real trace of interactions among Facebook users.

No MeSH data available.