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Dominance-related seasonal song production is unrelated to circulating testosterone in a subtropical songbird.

York JE, Radford AN, de Vries B, Groothuis TG, Young AJ - Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. (2016)

Bottom Line: However, while dominant males were more likely to sing and sang for longer than subordinate males, within-group paired comparisons revealed no dominance-related differences in circulating T.Moreover, comparisons both among and within individual dominant males revealed that song duration, syllable rate and proportion of time spent singing were all unrelated to circulating T.More widely, our results are in line with the view that male song production is not exclusively regulated by gonadally synthesized steroids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK; School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK. Electronic address: jenny.e.york@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Dawn song performance duration for subordinate (n = 10) and dominant (n = 10) males; and (b) circulating testosterone concentration (ng/ml) of subordinate (n = 14) and dominant (n = 14) males. Males were sampled as matched pairs (1 dominant and 1 subordinate male) from the same group, on the same day. Shown are mean ± SE.
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f0020: (a) Dawn song performance duration for subordinate (n = 10) and dominant (n = 10) males; and (b) circulating testosterone concentration (ng/ml) of subordinate (n = 14) and dominant (n = 14) males. Males were sampled as matched pairs (1 dominant and 1 subordinate male) from the same group, on the same day. Shown are mean ± SE.

Mentions: In addition, a matched-pairs comparison of dominant and subordinate male song performances sampled on the same day and in the same social group and outside of the within-group laying period showed that dominant males sang for significantly longer than subordinates on days when both males sang (paired t-test: t = 4.79, n = 10 paired males, p < 0.001; Fig. 4a).


Dominance-related seasonal song production is unrelated to circulating testosterone in a subtropical songbird.

York JE, Radford AN, de Vries B, Groothuis TG, Young AJ - Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. (2016)

(a) Dawn song performance duration for subordinate (n = 10) and dominant (n = 10) males; and (b) circulating testosterone concentration (ng/ml) of subordinate (n = 14) and dominant (n = 14) males. Males were sampled as matched pairs (1 dominant and 1 subordinate male) from the same group, on the same day. Shown are mean ± SE.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920672&req=5

f0020: (a) Dawn song performance duration for subordinate (n = 10) and dominant (n = 10) males; and (b) circulating testosterone concentration (ng/ml) of subordinate (n = 14) and dominant (n = 14) males. Males were sampled as matched pairs (1 dominant and 1 subordinate male) from the same group, on the same day. Shown are mean ± SE.
Mentions: In addition, a matched-pairs comparison of dominant and subordinate male song performances sampled on the same day and in the same social group and outside of the within-group laying period showed that dominant males sang for significantly longer than subordinates on days when both males sang (paired t-test: t = 4.79, n = 10 paired males, p < 0.001; Fig. 4a).

Bottom Line: However, while dominant males were more likely to sing and sang for longer than subordinate males, within-group paired comparisons revealed no dominance-related differences in circulating T.Moreover, comparisons both among and within individual dominant males revealed that song duration, syllable rate and proportion of time spent singing were all unrelated to circulating T.More widely, our results are in line with the view that male song production is not exclusively regulated by gonadally synthesized steroids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK; School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK. Electronic address: jenny.e.york@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus