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Dominance-related seasonal song production is unrelated to circulating testosterone in a subtropical songbird.

York JE, Radford AN, de Vries B, Groothuis TG, Young AJ - Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. (2016)

Bottom Line: However, while dominant males were more likely to sing and sang for longer than subordinate males, within-group paired comparisons revealed no dominance-related differences in circulating T.Moreover, comparisons both among and within individual dominant males revealed that song duration, syllable rate and proportion of time spent singing were all unrelated to circulating T.More widely, our results are in line with the view that male song production is not exclusively regulated by gonadally synthesized steroids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK; School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK. Electronic address: jenny.e.york@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A spectrogram of dominant male white-browed sparrow weaver dawn solo song recorded in South Africa. The song has a variable structure that consists of ‘free’ syllables uttered alone and syllables arranged together in phrases (within a phrase, inter-syllable intervals are no longer than 200 ms; Voigt et al., 2007).
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f0010: A spectrogram of dominant male white-browed sparrow weaver dawn solo song recorded in South Africa. The song has a variable structure that consists of ‘free’ syllables uttered alone and syllables arranged together in phrases (within a phrase, inter-syllable intervals are no longer than 200 ms; Voigt et al., 2007).

Mentions: Recordings of pre-emergence song (song produced prior to the male’s emergence from his roost chamber) were made from within 10 m of the male, using a Sennheiser ME66 directional microphone with a K6 power module (2004 Sennheiser), and a Marantz PMD660 solid-state recorder (D&M Holdings Inc.). Avisoft-SASLab Pro 5.1.16 (R. Specht, Berlin, Germany) was used to generate spectrograms (Hamming window, FFT of 1024 points, time resolution of 5.8 ms and 50% overlap). We focused our attention on song performance characteristics that previous studies have most commonly found to be impacted by the manipulation or blockade of circulating T (see Table 1 for examples). Male song has a variable structure that consists of syllables produced either alone or arranged in phrases (see Fig. 2 for an example; Voigt et al., 2007). “Syllable rate” (number of syllables/min) and “proportion of time spent singing” (cumulative duration of syllables) were calculated for the 5-min sample period following the performance start time (during which time the male remained within his roost chamber). This sample period was selected as a standard time point during the song performance for contrasts within and between males, and because males were guaranteed to be stationary during this period, ensuring that the quality of recording files was consistent.


Dominance-related seasonal song production is unrelated to circulating testosterone in a subtropical songbird.

York JE, Radford AN, de Vries B, Groothuis TG, Young AJ - Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. (2016)

A spectrogram of dominant male white-browed sparrow weaver dawn solo song recorded in South Africa. The song has a variable structure that consists of ‘free’ syllables uttered alone and syllables arranged together in phrases (within a phrase, inter-syllable intervals are no longer than 200 ms; Voigt et al., 2007).
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920672&req=5

f0010: A spectrogram of dominant male white-browed sparrow weaver dawn solo song recorded in South Africa. The song has a variable structure that consists of ‘free’ syllables uttered alone and syllables arranged together in phrases (within a phrase, inter-syllable intervals are no longer than 200 ms; Voigt et al., 2007).
Mentions: Recordings of pre-emergence song (song produced prior to the male’s emergence from his roost chamber) were made from within 10 m of the male, using a Sennheiser ME66 directional microphone with a K6 power module (2004 Sennheiser), and a Marantz PMD660 solid-state recorder (D&M Holdings Inc.). Avisoft-SASLab Pro 5.1.16 (R. Specht, Berlin, Germany) was used to generate spectrograms (Hamming window, FFT of 1024 points, time resolution of 5.8 ms and 50% overlap). We focused our attention on song performance characteristics that previous studies have most commonly found to be impacted by the manipulation or blockade of circulating T (see Table 1 for examples). Male song has a variable structure that consists of syllables produced either alone or arranged in phrases (see Fig. 2 for an example; Voigt et al., 2007). “Syllable rate” (number of syllables/min) and “proportion of time spent singing” (cumulative duration of syllables) were calculated for the 5-min sample period following the performance start time (during which time the male remained within his roost chamber). This sample period was selected as a standard time point during the song performance for contrasts within and between males, and because males were guaranteed to be stationary during this period, ensuring that the quality of recording files was consistent.

Bottom Line: However, while dominant males were more likely to sing and sang for longer than subordinate males, within-group paired comparisons revealed no dominance-related differences in circulating T.Moreover, comparisons both among and within individual dominant males revealed that song duration, syllable rate and proportion of time spent singing were all unrelated to circulating T.More widely, our results are in line with the view that male song production is not exclusively regulated by gonadally synthesized steroids.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Exeter, Penryn Campus, Cornwall TR10 9EZ, UK; School of Biological Sciences, Life Sciences Building, 24 Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TQ, UK. Electronic address: jenny.e.york@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus