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Cognitive training modifies disease symptoms in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

Yhnell E, Lelos MJ, Dunnett SB, Brooks SP - Exp. Neurol. (2016)

Bottom Line: All groups were then tested in an operant task of attention at 12months of age.Relative to the group that received comparable training in a non-attentional task, both wildtype and Hdh(Q111) mice that received attentional training demonstrated superior accuracy in the task and made fewer 'time out' errors.Attentional cognitive training also improved motor performance in Hdh(Q111) mice, thus leading to the conclusion that cognitive training can improve disease symptoms in a mouse model of HD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Brain Repair Group, Cardiff University School of Biosciences, The Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3AX, United Kingdom. Electronic address: YhnellE@cardiff.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Acquisition of a nose poke response at 12 months of age. All animals began the testing phase of the experiment at 12 months of age, in order to learn how to response in the operant boxes all animals began the testing phase with learning the simple nose poke response. Group 1 received previous attentional cognitive training in the 5CSRTT. Group 2 had received comparable non-attentional cognitive training and Group 3 were naïve control animals. A. Acquisition of nose poke responses over 15 days of testing. B. Acquisition of nose pokes responses averaged over 15 days of testing. Error bars represent ± standard error of the mean. Significant results are indicated, Grp = Group, Geno = Genotype, no significant interaction effects were demonstrated. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.
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f0010: Acquisition of a nose poke response at 12 months of age. All animals began the testing phase of the experiment at 12 months of age, in order to learn how to response in the operant boxes all animals began the testing phase with learning the simple nose poke response. Group 1 received previous attentional cognitive training in the 5CSRTT. Group 2 had received comparable non-attentional cognitive training and Group 3 were naïve control animals. A. Acquisition of nose poke responses over 15 days of testing. B. Acquisition of nose pokes responses averaged over 15 days of testing. Error bars represent ± standard error of the mean. Significant results are indicated, Grp = Group, Geno = Genotype, no significant interaction effects were demonstrated. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.

Mentions: Animals that received either cognitive training in the attentional operant task (Group 1) or comparable cognitive training in a non-attentional operant task (Group 2) were able to re-acquire the nose poke response rapidly, performing approximately 150 responses after 15 days of testing (Fig. 2A). However, the animals that were naive to the operant boxes (Group 3) took significantly longer to acquire the nose poke response than those that had previously been trained in the operant boxes (Group: F2,36 = 14.17, p < 0.01). After 15 days of testing the wildtype animals that were naive to the operant boxes (Group 3) were able to perform comparable levels of responses to HdhQ111/+ animals that had previously received operant training (Groups 1 & 2), although they were not able to perform as many trials as wildtype animals that had received operant training. HdhQ111/+ animals that were naive to the operant boxes were noticeably unable to initiate as many trials as the animals in the other testing groups. Overall HdhQ111/+ mice performed fewer nose pokes than wildtype mice (Fig. 2B; Genotype: F1,36 = 17.57, p < 0.001), but there was no interaction between genotype and group (Genotype × Group; F2,36 = 0.84, p = n.s.).


Cognitive training modifies disease symptoms in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

Yhnell E, Lelos MJ, Dunnett SB, Brooks SP - Exp. Neurol. (2016)

Acquisition of a nose poke response at 12 months of age. All animals began the testing phase of the experiment at 12 months of age, in order to learn how to response in the operant boxes all animals began the testing phase with learning the simple nose poke response. Group 1 received previous attentional cognitive training in the 5CSRTT. Group 2 had received comparable non-attentional cognitive training and Group 3 were naïve control animals. A. Acquisition of nose poke responses over 15 days of testing. B. Acquisition of nose pokes responses averaged over 15 days of testing. Error bars represent ± standard error of the mean. Significant results are indicated, Grp = Group, Geno = Genotype, no significant interaction effects were demonstrated. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920669&req=5

f0010: Acquisition of a nose poke response at 12 months of age. All animals began the testing phase of the experiment at 12 months of age, in order to learn how to response in the operant boxes all animals began the testing phase with learning the simple nose poke response. Group 1 received previous attentional cognitive training in the 5CSRTT. Group 2 had received comparable non-attentional cognitive training and Group 3 were naïve control animals. A. Acquisition of nose poke responses over 15 days of testing. B. Acquisition of nose pokes responses averaged over 15 days of testing. Error bars represent ± standard error of the mean. Significant results are indicated, Grp = Group, Geno = Genotype, no significant interaction effects were demonstrated. * p < 0.05, ** p < 0.01, *** p < 0.001.
Mentions: Animals that received either cognitive training in the attentional operant task (Group 1) or comparable cognitive training in a non-attentional operant task (Group 2) were able to re-acquire the nose poke response rapidly, performing approximately 150 responses after 15 days of testing (Fig. 2A). However, the animals that were naive to the operant boxes (Group 3) took significantly longer to acquire the nose poke response than those that had previously been trained in the operant boxes (Group: F2,36 = 14.17, p < 0.01). After 15 days of testing the wildtype animals that were naive to the operant boxes (Group 3) were able to perform comparable levels of responses to HdhQ111/+ animals that had previously received operant training (Groups 1 & 2), although they were not able to perform as many trials as wildtype animals that had received operant training. HdhQ111/+ animals that were naive to the operant boxes were noticeably unable to initiate as many trials as the animals in the other testing groups. Overall HdhQ111/+ mice performed fewer nose pokes than wildtype mice (Fig. 2B; Genotype: F1,36 = 17.57, p < 0.001), but there was no interaction between genotype and group (Genotype × Group; F2,36 = 0.84, p = n.s.).

Bottom Line: All groups were then tested in an operant task of attention at 12months of age.Relative to the group that received comparable training in a non-attentional task, both wildtype and Hdh(Q111) mice that received attentional training demonstrated superior accuracy in the task and made fewer 'time out' errors.Attentional cognitive training also improved motor performance in Hdh(Q111) mice, thus leading to the conclusion that cognitive training can improve disease symptoms in a mouse model of HD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Brain Repair Group, Cardiff University School of Biosciences, The Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3AX, United Kingdom. Electronic address: YhnellE@cardiff.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus