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Cognitive training modifies disease symptoms in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

Yhnell E, Lelos MJ, Dunnett SB, Brooks SP - Exp. Neurol. (2016)

Bottom Line: All groups were then tested in an operant task of attention at 12months of age.Relative to the group that received comparable training in a non-attentional task, both wildtype and Hdh(Q111) mice that received attentional training demonstrated superior accuracy in the task and made fewer 'time out' errors.Attentional cognitive training also improved motor performance in Hdh(Q111) mice, thus leading to the conclusion that cognitive training can improve disease symptoms in a mouse model of HD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Brain Repair Group, Cardiff University School of Biosciences, The Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3AX, United Kingdom. Electronic address: YhnellE@cardiff.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

A. Picture of the mouse operant boxes used in behavioural testing. B. Schematic representation of the operant box apparatus, the back response wall contained 9 stimulus lights, 5 of which were used in operant testing. Holes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 contained stimulus lights and photocell detectors to detect nose pokes via breaking of an infrared beam, these correspond to holes A, B, C, D and E. Holes 2, 4, 6 and 8 were covered with well blanks. Each nose poke contained a stimulus light and an infrared beam to detect nose poke responses.
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f0005: A. Picture of the mouse operant boxes used in behavioural testing. B. Schematic representation of the operant box apparatus, the back response wall contained 9 stimulus lights, 5 of which were used in operant testing. Holes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 contained stimulus lights and photocell detectors to detect nose pokes via breaking of an infrared beam, these correspond to holes A, B, C, D and E. Holes 2, 4, 6 and 8 were covered with well blanks. Each nose poke contained a stimulus light and an infrared beam to detect nose poke responses.

Mentions: Operant testing was conducted in 16 9-hole operant boxes, controlled by a BehaviourNet Controller BNC MkII operating system (Campden Instruments, Loughborough, UK). Each operant box (Fig. 1A) was housed within a sound attenuating chamber, the rear wall was curved and contained a horizontal array of nine holes (11 mm diameter, placed 2 mm apart and 15 mm above floor level). Each hole contained a photocell infrared beam at the front to detect nose pokes. At the rear, a light emitting device (LED) provided the target visual stimulus. Only 5 of the 9 holes (termed A, B, C, D and E) were used in testing; black plastic film covers were inserted over unused holes. A peristaltic pump delivered strawberry milk (Yazoo®, Campina Ltd, Horsham, UK) to a magazine at the front of the box. Reward delivery was signalled by an LED above the magazine. Nose pokes into the magazine were detected via an infrared beam.


Cognitive training modifies disease symptoms in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

Yhnell E, Lelos MJ, Dunnett SB, Brooks SP - Exp. Neurol. (2016)

A. Picture of the mouse operant boxes used in behavioural testing. B. Schematic representation of the operant box apparatus, the back response wall contained 9 stimulus lights, 5 of which were used in operant testing. Holes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 contained stimulus lights and photocell detectors to detect nose pokes via breaking of an infrared beam, these correspond to holes A, B, C, D and E. Holes 2, 4, 6 and 8 were covered with well blanks. Each nose poke contained a stimulus light and an infrared beam to detect nose poke responses.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920669&req=5

f0005: A. Picture of the mouse operant boxes used in behavioural testing. B. Schematic representation of the operant box apparatus, the back response wall contained 9 stimulus lights, 5 of which were used in operant testing. Holes 1, 3, 5, 7 and 9 contained stimulus lights and photocell detectors to detect nose pokes via breaking of an infrared beam, these correspond to holes A, B, C, D and E. Holes 2, 4, 6 and 8 were covered with well blanks. Each nose poke contained a stimulus light and an infrared beam to detect nose poke responses.
Mentions: Operant testing was conducted in 16 9-hole operant boxes, controlled by a BehaviourNet Controller BNC MkII operating system (Campden Instruments, Loughborough, UK). Each operant box (Fig. 1A) was housed within a sound attenuating chamber, the rear wall was curved and contained a horizontal array of nine holes (11 mm diameter, placed 2 mm apart and 15 mm above floor level). Each hole contained a photocell infrared beam at the front to detect nose pokes. At the rear, a light emitting device (LED) provided the target visual stimulus. Only 5 of the 9 holes (termed A, B, C, D and E) were used in testing; black plastic film covers were inserted over unused holes. A peristaltic pump delivered strawberry milk (Yazoo®, Campina Ltd, Horsham, UK) to a magazine at the front of the box. Reward delivery was signalled by an LED above the magazine. Nose pokes into the magazine were detected via an infrared beam.

Bottom Line: All groups were then tested in an operant task of attention at 12months of age.Relative to the group that received comparable training in a non-attentional task, both wildtype and Hdh(Q111) mice that received attentional training demonstrated superior accuracy in the task and made fewer 'time out' errors.Attentional cognitive training also improved motor performance in Hdh(Q111) mice, thus leading to the conclusion that cognitive training can improve disease symptoms in a mouse model of HD.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Brain Repair Group, Cardiff University School of Biosciences, The Sir Martin Evans Building, Museum Avenue, Cardiff, Wales CF10 3AX, United Kingdom. Electronic address: YhnellE@cardiff.ac.uk.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus