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Village sanitation and child health: Effects and external validity in a randomized field experiment in rural India.

Hammer J, Spears D - J Health Econ (2016)

Bottom Line: Over a billion people worldwide defecate in the open, with important consequences for early-life health and human capital accumulation in developing countries.We find an effect of approximately 0.3 height-for-age standard deviations, which is consistent with observations and hypotheses in economic and health literatures.We further exploit details of the planning and implementation of the experiment to study treatment heterogeneity and external validity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, United States.

No MeSH data available.


Survey-reported morbidity by assigned treatment status.
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fig0010: Survey-reported morbidity by assigned treatment status.

Mentions: Fig. 2 presents effects of the experiment on reported diarrhea morbidity. Within Ahmednagar, there is no difference between treatment and control groups at baseline (t = 1.07; p = 0.29); but at endline, reported diarrhea was statistically significantly reduced in the treatment group relative to the control group (t =−2.12; p = 0.04). Thus, the difference-in-differences estimate of the impact of the program on survey-reported diarrhea is a reduction of 2.8 percentage points (s . e . =0.013; p = 0.029). As a plausible indicator of mechanism specificity, following Galiani et al. (2005), there is no impact in reported cough (t = 0.24; p = 0.82), nor of planned treatment and control assignment in Nanded and Nandurbar.


Village sanitation and child health: Effects and external validity in a randomized field experiment in rural India.

Hammer J, Spears D - J Health Econ (2016)

Survey-reported morbidity by assigned treatment status.
© Copyright Policy - CC BY
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4920645&req=5

fig0010: Survey-reported morbidity by assigned treatment status.
Mentions: Fig. 2 presents effects of the experiment on reported diarrhea morbidity. Within Ahmednagar, there is no difference between treatment and control groups at baseline (t = 1.07; p = 0.29); but at endline, reported diarrhea was statistically significantly reduced in the treatment group relative to the control group (t =−2.12; p = 0.04). Thus, the difference-in-differences estimate of the impact of the program on survey-reported diarrhea is a reduction of 2.8 percentage points (s . e . =0.013; p = 0.029). As a plausible indicator of mechanism specificity, following Galiani et al. (2005), there is no impact in reported cough (t = 0.24; p = 0.82), nor of planned treatment and control assignment in Nanded and Nandurbar.

Bottom Line: Over a billion people worldwide defecate in the open, with important consequences for early-life health and human capital accumulation in developing countries.We find an effect of approximately 0.3 height-for-age standard deviations, which is consistent with observations and hypotheses in economic and health literatures.We further exploit details of the planning and implementation of the experiment to study treatment heterogeneity and external validity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University, United States.

No MeSH data available.